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  1. Evening all, I took advantage of my time away from the classroom last week and finally finished this two-and-a-bit year project: Tigger Models' (the old ID Models' vac kit) of the Short Sunderland in 1/32nd scale. This has been a really rewarding project, and despite a setback when I knocked the completed fuselage with its interior off the table, making a rather messy contact with the kitchen floor, it's been great fun and relatively straightforward - despite its size. Kits like this come as a blank canvass for the builder to work his/her magic - 'bumps in plastic' is quite apt, but the shapes are reasonably accurate if not a bit primitive (picture borrowed from Tigger's webpage): The kit provides a the correct hull shape for a MkI or MkII, but with some mods the more adventurous builder could easily convert it to a MkIII/V, etc. All panel lines and surface details need to be added and the parts are devoid of any real detail, but the plastic is lovely to work with and scribes/sands beautifully. Due to the size of the parts, home-made interior bulkheads are needed, and any visible parts of the interior need to be made from scratch: Strong wing spars are also essential to keep the structure of the model sound - thick plastic card spars were made and added: The flightdeck interior, bomb room and nose section were all made from scratch and detailed with some aftermarket seatbelts: All the aerials were made from sprue and thin wire - markings were mix of home-made masks and decals: The engines were made from spare HK Models' B-17 cylinders coupled with Revell Beaufighter parts to make a reasonable representation of the Bristol Pegasus. The early-style exhausts were made from Evergreen tube bent slowly over the toaster! Landing lights were home made from some of my daughter's diamante play/craft jewellery (for the lights) and the covers were clear acetate once again heated over the toaster. Rigging for the floats came for EasyLine and reminded me why I'll never build a biplane! The kit's transparencies were used throughout - all turret interiors were scratch built. Beaching gear was also made from scratch with a friend helping out with some 3D printed wheels: Bomb racks were again made from scratch with some rather lovely depth charges coming from Tim Perry - thanks, Tim! I used Xtracolor enamels throughout the build - 6 tins were used in total! I don't like to go too mad with weathering on my models so kept it relatively clean - however you can't build a Sunderland without the distinctive water marks on the hull: A bit of exhaust staining and some fading with post-shading completed the upper surfaces: And for some generic pictures: I'm often asked how big a 1/32nd Sunderland is. I'm sorry to inflict my ugly mug on you but you can see that it is a massive model with yours truly holding it! My model represents a Sunderland MkII of 201 Squadron during 1942 in the lovely temperate sea scheme. Painting white gives me nightmares (especially something of this size) so I took the easier option. W4001 (ZM-V) was only on strength between February to October 1942, before hitting an underwater rock and being written off, thankfully with no loss of life. Thanks for those who took an interest along the way - I'm off for a long lay down in a darkened room to contemplate the next project! Best wishes to all, Tom
    74 points
  2. Hello all I brought this one across the finish line just before New Years but I only had time to take some pictures now. (For the Photo Geeks amongst us, I used a Canon EOS 5Ds with a 24-105mm L lens and a 80x80x80cm lightbox) The kit was my first full blown resin kit and it was a little intimidating to say the least. Up until now I did not enjoy using large amounts of CA glue but it has been a good experience. The fit is overall very good, especially between the 3D printed parts. It is a big heavy model but the landing gear (3D printed as one piece) is very sturdy and supports the model very well indeed. How great is it to have a 1/32 JA37 Viggen! - now bring on the Draken!! Enjoy /Niels
    74 points
  3. Trumpeter Su-27 1/32 finally finished... I tried to build heavy weathered Flanker based above polar circle with units called “ Guardians of the North”. I used Zacto intakes, nosecone, missiles and pylons. Aires Cockpit, wheel wells and exhausts. Armory resin wheels. Front windshield is a scratch build as kit part was really bad in shape. Colors - MRP paint including silver primer, transparent paints and metalizers. Tamiya panel liners and weathering Masters used. WIP here:
    72 points
  4. Here is my recently completed 1/32 Tamiya F4U-1a Corsair painted in one of Greg "Pappy" Boyington's purported mounts, BuNo. 17740. The Tamiya kit is an extraordinary state-of-the-art kit and doesn't need much to build up into an impressive model but I did take the liberty of adding a few aftermarket items: 1. Vector Resin Cowling 2. Barracuda Resin Wheels and Tires 3. HGW Fabric and Phototech Harness 4. Barracuda Cockpit Stencils 5. Montex Masks 6. True Details Resin Parachute 7. HGW Wet Transfer Stencils The complete build can be found here: The canopy is removable so that I can pose it in the closed or open position. I did not glue the wings into place so that transport would be easier. AK Real Colors acrylic paints were used for the exterior.
    64 points
  5. Hi All This is the 1/32 Trumpeter MiG-29C built as a Ukrainian Air Force MiG-29S (9-13). It is loaded for a CAS mission inspired by a photograph I found online. It is impossible not to feel the impact of a war in Europe, in what feels like my own backyard - and like so many on these forums I also felt the urge to show my support. I tried to incorporate as much aftermarket stuff produced in Ukraine as I could. The Rocket Pods and Wheels are from ResKit. The paint masks are both from Foxbot and DN Models. The seat is from Quickboost and the pitot tube to replace the telegraph pole included in the kit is from Master. The exhausts are from Zacto model. The decals are a story of their own - I screwed up the first paintjob using the Foxbot masks I already had so I had to start over While waiting for the brand new released masking set to arrive from DN Models, Foxbot also announced a brand new set of decals for a digital camo MiG-29. I wrote Oleg from Foxbot if I could somehow get a set and he happily sent me one straight from Kyiv in the middle of an active warzone. That kinda makes this model special for me.. I painted the model entirely using paints from MRP - the second time also in the right order . Below in order from Dark to Light: MRP-034 Tank Grey (MRP-405 seems to be too light for the MiG-29) MRP-403 Grey MRP-402 Light Grey MRP-246 Light Arctic Grey The underside is painted with MRP 405 Blue Grey Hope you like it Niels Click the images and they will open in a larger version
    61 points
  6. Hi everyone, 4 years after I started this build, I have only just got around to adding the finishing touches and calling it done.. A bit of background: Lopes Hope is a P51C-5-NT that Aircorps Aviation in Minnesota have put back in the air. I was so blown away by the photographic records they kept and the absolute commitment to accuracy they employ that I wrote to them asking for more info about the airframe. I was stunned when their VP wrote back offering to share info, permission to use their photo's in my build log and any support I needed - starting a relationship that flourishes to this day. They are the same guys that host the Aircorps Library which is an incredible online resource offering for a nominal membership fee access to all the factory drawings and manuals for a range of seminal aircraft. Their notes on this P51 and why they chose it echo my own: "Lope's Hope 3rd was a P-51C flown by Lt. Donald Lopez. Donald and Lope's Hope 3rd served in the China-Burma-India theater with the 14th Air Force, 23rd Fighter Group, 75th Squadron. The 23rd Fighter Group was the descendent of the famous American Volunteer Group or Flying Tigers after the US entered the war. Lt. Lopez had 5 victories in China and went on to become a test pilot in the early years of the jet age. Later he was the deputy director of the Smithsonian National Air and Space museum until his death in 2008. Donald Lopez was instrumental in the construction and opening of the National Air and Space Museum. The original wartime Lope's Hope 3rd was a P51C-5-NT, Army Air Force Serial Number: 42-103585. The serial number information was just acquired through the generous contribution of pages from Lt. Lopez's war time log book by his granddaughter Laura Lopez. Normally a WWII fighter's serial number is easily determined by just looking at the tail number. Squadrons in almost every theater of operations number planes this way, but not in China. In China the 23rd Fighter Group's squadrons were assigned a block of numbers for differentiating their aircraft. The 75th squadron's block was 150- 199 (or to 200 depending on source). Lt. Lopez used 194 on both his P-40N s and on his P-51C , Lope's Hope 3rd. Without his log book it might have been impossible to figure out his Mustang's AAF serial number. Our restoration airframe is a P-51C-10NT Army Air Force Serial Number: 43-24907 , that remained in the continental US during WWII and was used for training purposes during and immediately after the war. The decision to paint her in Lt. Lopez's color scheme is intended to honor him and his service to his country in WWII and to aviation all his life." The model started as a 1/18 HpH Desktop GRP shell.. and 1,230 pictures and a lot of work later, it looks like this.. I really enjoyed this one... it spoilt me though, having every drawing of every part and great references from the restoration meant i could just build everything i saw in front of me - that collection of hundreds, if not thousands of parts resulted in I think my best model. It is certainly a more complex aeroplane than the Spitfire I made, for example the gear bays on this were about 3 - 4 months work, on the Spit a week or two, there is virtually nothing in it's bays I hope you enjoy it and all my thanks to Aircorps and everyone who chipped in with encouragement in my build thread until next time Peter
    60 points
  7. Italeri 1/32 F-104A Starfighter. Between 1958 - 1960 NAVY loaned 3 F-104A Starfighters from USAF to conduct tests of new Sidewinder missiles. Airplanes were based at NAWS China Lake - California. The kit was easy to build but a pain to get ready for natural metal finish I intended to make. Both fuselage halves had panel lines of different width and depth, surface was uneven and lot of sanding and polishing was required. The fuselage was initially sprayed with MR Surfacer 500 from a can and then sanded and polished followed by a layer of gloss white GX1. I used MRP metallic colors for NMF finish. Mostly Silver 128 and White Aluminium tinted with MRP White and MRP transparent paints. Polished by the polishing stick. Rivets were added after the paint job. I left the surface without a top clear coat as it would ruin the sheen of metallic paints. Aires - cockpit and wheel wells Eduard - exhausts, Sidewinders and wheels Model Master - pitot tube Paints - MRP "MR Paint"
    59 points
  8. March 30/21 Thanks to Covid and lots of extra time, I have finished the 1/32 Italeri F-104G kit, converted to a Canadian CF-104 in only 4 months, which is a record short time for me. I have a WIP Thread on how I built this model here: 1/32 Italeri CF-104 "Kicked Up A Notch" Kit is one of the latest versions with great decals, #2514. Aftermarket Items are as follows: Black Box Resin Cockpit, 32009, made for the Hasegawa kit Aires Electronics and Ammunition Bay, #2208 ResKit Engine and Exhaust, RSU32-20 ResKit CF-104 Wheels/Tires, RSU-32-9 Master F-104 brass Pitot Tube, AM-32-037 Eduard Exterior PE set, 32427 (only 1 part) Videoaviation SUU-21 Bomb Dispenser (converted to MN-1A), 141632 Airscale Instrument Bezels and Gauge Decals Belcher Bits CF-104 decals, BD-8 Belcher Bits Canadian T-33 decals, BD24-1 (Letters and Numbers only) HGW decal rivets, 322011 (> 9,000 of them!) Paint was mostly Alclad Chrome and Aluminum shades over Tamiya Gloss Black Lacquer (TS-14), followed by a clear coat of Tamiya X-22 to allow for decals and decal solutions on the fragile Chrome. Other shades were mostly MRP synthetic lacquers. Final Quick Thoughts This kit is a real mixed bag of some good features and many challenges, but overall can be made into a pretty accurate looking F-104. The deep and wide panel lines are the weakest part of the fuselage which are very hard to mitigate, so you pretty much have to just live with them. While the Black Box (Avionix) resin cockpit made for the Hasegawa kit fit fairly well with a few modifications, the Aires Avionics and Ammunition Bay was a very tight fit and is not recommended for beginners. The ResKit engine/exhaust and CF-104 wheels are outstanding, while the Videoaviation SUU-21 (converted to MN-1A) bomb dispenser was pretty good with 2 sets of decals. The biggest surprise was the kit decals, which I would also consider outstanding, but I understand that decals in earlier versions of this kit are not very good. The HGW decal rivets worked much better than I thought, but with over 9,000 of them, you really have to put in a lot of extra time and effort to get the desired effect. Overall, a very good modeling experience, but I’m also really glad it’s over with! Oh Canada eh!, for the subject theme. Here is generally the look I was going for (second one in), which was in the mid-60's before the "RCAF" was replaced with "CAF". Note the "modern" roundels, which is a fairly rare pic, because pics of CF-104's with RCAF on them almost always have the older and more complex maple leafs in the roundels, suggesting that this must have been a short lived event. Tonal color variations in the metallic skin, as well as painted areas for corrosion protection, were incorporated. Note: The metallic finish was very hard to photograph with my usual flat white background, which made the paint look dull, so I have added a few more pics with a blue background to show the metallic finish a bit better. I’m really proud of this "no-glue" accomplishment, which allows me to take stuff off that will break when transporting the model or flipping it over for pics. This is the Master brass pitot tube, but it’s not plug and play. I sanded the nose down before painting to ensure that the rear of the tube fit flush and used red decal film for the sharp red stripe, which should be about 5 bands. Lots of stencils and decals underneath as well. A few of the cockpit area. Note the holes where the pins are inserted along the sill on the right. Buried behind the Electronics bay is a fuel tank as found on early CF-104's, replacing the Ammunition Box since there was no gun. The angle of the Avionics door should be more vertical, but once you drill the holes for the pins you are stuck with what you get unless you want the door sloppy. Good enough! And now some walkaround pics. Cheers, Chuck
    58 points
  9. Hey folks, I'm normally a lurker here, I don't tend to post outside of my regular sites just read other peoples stuff. But I've been told I should post this over here so here I am, cap in hand showing you my finished bird. It's out the box and yes I'm fully aware of all the shortcomings of the kit, Davis Wing, Turrets yardy yar etc etc I've put Master Model Barrels on it and some RB belts, not that you can see them, but other than that she's El Naturel Finished in Alclad, Gunze and Ushchi metal powders, weathered with Mig products. Thanks for looking and be gentle......... Gary
    58 points
  10. It is easy to get sidetracked when researching the A6M2. It will inevitably lead the enthusiastic reader to Canada, which it did in my case. I didn't know that Mitsubishi's competitor Nakajima built Zero's, or that there were subtle (and obvious) ways of knowing the difference. One of those differences, the white surround to the Hinomaru, was one of the major features I wanted to incorporate in this build, since it highlights the dark shade of the grey with which the Zero was painted. Then I discovered the concept of the Houkoku presentation number, and that became number two on the wish list! How does this research end up in Canada you may ask? In 1968 an enterprising Canadian from Manitoba went in search of wreckage on Ballale Island in the Western Solomon Islands, and he hit the Nakajima built Houkoku A6M2 motherload. Three of them! They were chopped up (along with a Val), and carried out of the jungle by local labour, put onto boats and by the most amazing feat of horse trading ended up on Friendship Field in Carman, Manitoba. Their story is pretty complicated, but ends up in a collection of artefacts owned by the Blayd Corporation, also from Carman. A name that kept surfacing around these aircraft and research about them is Ryan Toews - another Canadian. Ryan's tweak list for building both of the Tamiya Zero's is a must read for anyone attempting these kits, and he has been a veritable gold mine of information for this project. You can see his contributions in the build thread, along with all the other information about the construction and painting that I won't rehash here. Since the tails of these aircraft were not attached to the wrecks, it is pure speculation at this stage to assign any identity other than the construction number. The aircraft is pictured soon after delivery to the island, having been assembled and test flown, awaiting the painting of unit identification. A final salute... Sean
    57 points
  11. Hi folks, My first RFI on LSP. A build I finished last summer on wich I worked for some times. The subject is the uberknown John Landers's "Big Beautiful Doll". Timeframe of my build set it to before he was appointed full colonel, so no checkers on the wings, and victory board not complete yet. In order to avoid varnish and silvering, all markings are painted, and the stencils are from HGW. AM Used: Amur Flaps Barracuda's cockpit stencils GW external stencils Yahu IP (was given a bit of relief with bezels) Lifelike Decals. Used as ref to make the masks. The only actual decal used is the name on the canopy frame. The subject at the chosen timeframe Finished Pics: Now closing up with the lady Landing light was missing at the photoshoot time, it was since added. And a few Build pics: She's not perfect, but I hope you will like her. Cheers Mathieu
    57 points
  12. finished 4 years ago but never had the chance to take photos of the two together , both models are form tamiya in 1/32 scale, just used decals for the small data, the rest is all airbrushed,
    57 points
  13. mc65

    F86K 1/32 Kittyhawk

    hi all, here a "Kappone" (big K) built on request of a colleauge of mine, itself being the son of a pilot serving in the Aeronautica Militare Italiana, 51° stormo, in the 60ties. strange enough, being an aircraft built by Fiat on license from North American, there is not so much references about it. so, I mantained a low profile attitude, trying to hold off my rivet counter attitude and finish it in a reasonable time to present it to the unaware final recipient. I just added an Eduard set, very useful in the cockpit area, and made some stencils for the italian codes to emulate the 51-32, serial 54858, aircraft of the "pluto" group with the red tail, to wich was attached my colleauge's father. the only thing I modified was the angle of the opened speed brakes, totally mistaken by KH. painted with Alclad II and fitted with beautiful HGW RBF flags. a simple wooden base with lightly painted sandpaper was made to accomodate it safely. actually I haven't a big feeling with modern era airplanes, but build this one was relaxing and interesting, opening a new mental window toward the post WWII era in my mind. enjoy!
    57 points
  14. Hi, so another Israeli bird is out. It is an F-4E Kurnass 2000 number 650 from the Bat SQN, Tayeset 119. The F-4E kit from Tamiya is used as a basis. The building was quite comfortable, I did not encounter any major problems. I used the cockpit from Avionix, of course, supplemented with a modification of the Kurnass 2000 version, MFDs, few switches, and a new HUD were added. I also used the seamless intakes from RealModel and thanks to Miro Medzihradsky for the dimensionally accurate engine nozzles. The refueling probe and part of the decals from Isracast are complemented by Hebrew stencils from Skys Decals. The armor plates in the lower part are cut out with a plotter, the central fuel tank is from the F-4J kit modified to the IAF standard. What bothered me the most was the slatted wing, but I think that the result revived the model. The AGM-142 with a pod are from the F-16I kit, but it was necessary to enlarge the pylons because they were specially adapted for these missiles and I also redesigned the guidance part of the missiles. The outer pylon for AN/ASW-55 is from RealModel. The AN/ALQ-184 (short) ECM s from AMS Resin and the adapter for ECM and reduction for the Sidewinder to the AIM-7 shaft are homemade. The whole model is rescribed and riveting according to available materials. The wheels and arresting hook are produced by Eduard. MRP colors and Ammo Of Mig washes were used on the surface. The sources are from Isracast and Double Ugly Books. Thanks for all comments. Added pictures:
    57 points
  15. Happy New Year everybody! It's about time to post the pics of my finished 1/32nd scale Viking. The background is not ideal as the photo booth is too small. No way to take photos of the diorama either - I'll have to wait for better weather to take these photos. Anyway, no need for a lot of text this time - for those interested in the building process, here's the link to the WIP: Comments, critique and questions are welcome as usual!
    57 points
  16. Just finished the Trumpeter 1/32 SU-27UB , its the 2nd time I have built this in this camouflage pattern, it doesn't get any easier. So its an OTB build, the only extras are the static discharge’s, and Quinta studios cockpit decals, I also used Foxbot masking , but as a template then cut mine out of Tamiya masking sheets, and HATAKA acrylic paints enjoy. Mike
    56 points
  17. I would like to show you the model of the jet that I love. A-6E Intruder from Trumpeter 1:32 scale as always, a model made straight out of the box. Therefore, some of the decals don't match the original. The Trumpeter A-6 model is one of the best models of this company in the 1:32 scale. Unfortunately, model it's quite complicated and demanding to build. However, this is one of those jets that you must have on your shelf. 1: 1 I 1:32
    56 points
  18. Well as hard as I tried to build a kit out of the box, I failed miserably, couldn't do it... This is the HK Models Lancaster, pretty much from the box other than filling in 22 windows cutting in 3 new windows, scratch building a lifeboat, blanking off the turret gun ports, removing their gun sights, ammo cans, put an Eduard cockpit set in as well as the radiators and intake screens. Also printed the markings for it which in hind sight I wished I had cut stencils for them instead... The model is pretty much finished, don't know where I can store it, it's a monster...atleast I can remove the wings still. The HK kit goes together well, I liked building it more than their B-17 or B-25.
    56 points
  19. My rendition of Major Edward Giller's "The Millie G" is now complete. This was by far my most involved project with extra detailing for the engine, cockpit, landing gear bays and the MG bays. Here's a link to the build thread in the Works in Progress section: https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/92956-132-tamiya-p-51d-15-na-mustang-the-millie-g/ Thanks for all the comments and suggestions during the build. In summary, here were the aftermarket additions to the kit: Barracuda cockpit upgrade Barracuda instrument panel Barracuda cockpit sidewalls HGW seatbelts Eduard guy bay kit (late) Barracuda P-51D tires Eduard P-51 exterior detail kit Barracuda decals + placards Eduard canopy masks Eduard engine detail kit The main paints used were Mr. Color lacquers. Now for the final photos. All of the main markings were painted except the stars and bars and tactical lettering, which were decals. The stencils from the Barracuda decals were used instead of the kit stencils. The ailerons and elevators were glued in place. The rudder and flaps are movable and do a pretty good job of staying in place. The Eduard gun bay doors is an excellent upgrade over the kit doors. The ammo belts are from the Tamiya kit. The engine covers are all removable and fit reasonably well with Tamiya's magnet system. The starboard panel just under the exhaust is a little fiddly. The weathering was a combination of oils, airbrushed Tamiya acrylics (heavily thinned) used for local effects and with sponge chipping and spatter templates. Colored pencils and pastels were also used for various effects. Mr. Color GX100 was used for gloss coats and GX114 for flat coats. Great stuff. I used Mr. Color C330 RAF Dark Green for the fuselage. And a slightly darker version for the nose checks and spinner green. The NMF paints are Mr. Color Super Metallics. The checks on the nose were painted. The drop tank fuel and pressure lines were created from 0.5mm wire. I kept the weathering on the drop tanks relatively light since often they were single use items. All of the fastener holes in the engine panel frames were drilled out. Light colored oils were used on the NMF surfaces to depict varying amounts of oxidation on the panels. Eduard's engine upgrade contains PE hose clamps for all of the main hoses and piping in the engine. They are a pain to attach and paint but look pretty snappy when complete. Also, the edges of the gunsight glass were painted Tamiya clear green to simulate the look of the thick glass plate. The aluminum paint on the wings was rendered with a combination of the Mr. Color Silver and light gray. Mr. Surfacer was used to fill the rivets and panel lines on the forward 40% of the wings. Grime and wear was depicted using a combination of Tamiya acrylics, oil paints and colored pencils. Some wear is down to the primer and some is down to the base metal. The primer toward the back of the wing is ZCY and the primer toward the front is dark gray putty colored, based on the construction process. The Eduard gun bay doors really add a lot compared to the kit doors. The Eduard doors come with a hinge at the bottom of the door for gluing it permanently in place. I wanted to be able to remove them, so I made tabs similar to the kit doors and glued them onto the Eduard doors. I also added a support rod made out of 0.3mm wire. I really like the iconic 343 FS, 55th FG markings. Chipping around the panels and doors was done with acrylic paints and colored pencils. The cockpit detail from the Barracuda kit is quite good (details are on the build thread). One note was that I changed the wiring from the radio box behind the pilot seat because the cable harness would interfere with the canopy support bracket. So I converted to a strand of speaker wire and painted it black. Thanks for following along! Comments and critiques are more than welcome. Thanks again.
    55 points
  20. Hi All Well, I guess I am suffering a bit from "Post-Viggen Blues" - I cannot really seem to chose what to build next. I am pretty sure it will be one of my numerous F-16 projects.. In the mean time I uploaded a few pictures of, what turned out to be a productive corona-lock-down-year of Modern Jets for me. I build everything from all eras but it seems to come in waves for me. With the Border Model Lancaster hopefully arriving in a couple of months, I think 2022 will be "The year of the Lancaster" First up is the 1/32 Kitty Hawk Mirage 2000C (OOB) in a special livery. Its a really nice and detailed kit but bit of a pain to build. Next up is the 1/32 Italeri Tornado GR.4. backdated to a GR.1. - I added the Aires Cockpit, Wolfpack Seats and a set of JP233´s I had from Paragon Designs (I think) The kit was bit of a letdown for me if I am honest but it is still better than the Revell Kit. Next in line is a project I wanted to do for quite some time. It is the Tamiya 1/32 F-4E converted to an F-4G. I used the GT Resin conversion kit but that was a disaster. Very very disappointed with the casting quality of that. The cockpit tub was unusable and so was a number of the other parts. I ended up scratch building quite a bit but I like how it turned out. Weapons are from Eduard Brassin. I also found time to complete my 1/32 Trumpeter A-6E Intruder (carry-over from 2020). I know most people would fill in all those rivets but I quite like the look of them. This was my first time using the cockpit decals from ANYZ, and wow! Never again without Bombs are from VideoAviation Lastly I spent quite some time building a 1/32 Trumpeter F-14A Tomcat. I cannot have a 1/32 collection without building a VF-84 Tomcat - I was a teenager in the 80´s and this is what a Tomcat looked like I added the Aires Cockpit and weapons are from Eduard Brassin (it also has a full load of AIM-54´s). Next Tomcat I will use the Zacto Model intakes. Decals are from HAD Models ...and of course the Viggen Hope you like them Niels
    55 points
  21. 1/32 Revell kit HGW wet transfers Eduard Look instrument panel, mask Barracuda wheels Eagle Cals #138 All colours MRP
    55 points
  22. WIP thread here https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/85552-hk-models-132-b-17g/ Here is my reference pic. She and her crew went through 83 missions and she survived the war only to end up scrapped. I’ve not aimed for a 100% replica of the original, but enough hopefully to capture her likeness: My longest project ever a year on & off. Magic Scale Modelling light & sound so there’s a link to a short video of the startup & shutdown process at the end. I might add some more pics & another video later showing the lighting but the aluminium needed outdoor shots to do justice. Thanks for looking. Seldom have I placed my faith in any higher body more than when I released my grip after fixing this to its wall mount. Thank you HKM for this superb bonus! If you watch the video don’t forget to turn the sound up!
    54 points
  23. Hi all, Just finished this, lovely kit - but the Meng additions are average - Instructions/ Decals. The wings were bent, but easily reformed. Work in Progress here: https://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=11486.0 Guy
    54 points
  24. hello everyone No way of dressing it up, but I have changed subject again... I will go back to the Fairey Firefly - this is it's second time of falling out of favour, but when you get the urge what do you do? My new flame is the early longnose P40. I have always thought it would make a good subject for me and very nearly started one after my P51, but didn't fancy another American aircraft in quick succession. It's easy to see why.. ..beautiful lines, natural metal and technically interesting. This is G-CIIO operated by The Fighter Collection who have said I can come and take at look at her once we are into the New Year and assuming there is no covid funny business preventing a visit... I have spent the last month or so researching and finding out about the airframe and the differences with the later short nose P40s and the earlier P36 - of which there are many. I also liked the timing with the GWH 1/32 kit coming out as folks will be talking P40's for a bit I had Jumpeii Temmas plans scaled and corresponded with Witold Jaworski who has digitally modelled the P40C and had done loads of research and analysis of factory drawings One thing I really looked forward to was doing what I did with my P51 and getting stuck into those drawings to replicate everything part by part. This was always something that hindered the Firefly, I just don't like working in a vacuum, I like the research and knowing what I am making is accurate An example like this - here is the tailwheel door in the parts manual.. ..I can find the part number and in Aircorps Library, look up the drawings.. ..then scale and copy the drawings to make up a set of photo-etch parts.. ..I did this hundereds of times and now have the mother of all PE sheets at 28cm by 47cm with everything I thought I could do in PE represented.. i thought I would base the model on the 21st Century Toys 'model' as I did with their Fw190D -this was on the basis that while it is a toy, the 190 was dimensionally pretty accurate.. So a trip to ebay and £160 lighter, one turned up.. Once the 'model' arrived I set about destroying it into it's component parts - this involved sawing some of the nose elements in half so I ended up with effectively two fuselage halves.. cue the first plan comparison and a very deflated feeling... ..it's too short, too narrow, has what looks like the late chin profile and is generally all over the place.. ..the rear fuselage is particularly out.. ..now, I did toy with the idea of just getting on with reworking it, but the more I looked, the more work I found - in the end I was trying to justify it because I had spent the money.. In the end, I bit the bullet and decided to scratch build it - I have no excuse - I have great drawings and having just scratchbuilt a Hawker Fury so feeling pretty confident.. ..first step was to get a sheet of perspex acrylic to trace out a 'keel'... ..I used a scalpel to score the perspex - you may juts be able to see some of the station lines here (on the red line).. ..once I had all the station points and outlines done, I used a jigsaw and a cutting disc to cut out the profile - with a big bit missing for where the cockpit is.. ..this again told me how out of whack the 21st Century Toys model is.. ..using Jumpeii's profiles I cut out all the fuselage station formers.. ..and cemented them in place using a mini set square.. ..then I soldered some square brass stock to get the dihedral right for wings to slide into - there is a little perspex jig holding it upright inbetween them.. ..they were epoxied in place with the smaller sliding box sections in place so the angles and dangles can be seen and the positioning made correct.. ..so there we are - thousands of hours of work to go, but it feels good to have something fresh on the bench and thats what it's all about right? TTFN Peter
    53 points
  25. This is my recently completed build of the Revell Me262B-1/U-1 kit in 1/32 scale. I have chosen to depict Red 10 of 10./NJG11, which was one of four Me262B nightfighters captured by the Allies at the end of the war. The aftermarket item list for this build is as follows: 1. Master FuG 218 Neptun brass radar assembly 2. Barracuda Me262 resin wheels 3. HGW Me262B fabric seatbelts 4. Eduard Me262B-1 Exterior set 5. Eduard Me262B-1 Interior set 6. Eduard Me262B-1 Mask set Please note that large portions of the Eduard Exterior and Interior set went unused. Major markings were painted using masks produced with a Silhouette Portrait cutter. Kit decals were used for the remainder of the markings. The start-to-finish build thread can be referenced at the following link:
    53 points
  26. While I'm messing about trying to finish my 109e-3 thought I'd post my build of Tamiya's gorgeous Corsair F4U-1A I did a while back (I know, another one! But it's such a beautiful kit). The subject is Greg "Pappy" Boyington's 833 from the famous Black Sheep squadron VMF-214 based on Vella Lavella in late 1943. The kit was a pleasure to build with excellent engineering from Tamiya and plenty of detail to play with. As such, aftermarket was kept to a minimum only using Barracuda cockpit stencils and placards and Montex canopy and insignia masks. I scratchbuilt some additional engine detail, the cowl flap pulley system, and wheel well plumbing. Scratchbuilding the cowl flap pulley system in particular sent me a bit nuts and, given my time again, would probably just stump up for the Vector replacement set. Paint was mainly Gunze and Tamiya acrylics, weathering with hairspray chipping, salt fading, and oils. Cheers, Kirby
    53 points
  27. Here is my rendition of the ‘bent-wing bird’. I used the Eduard cockpit (never again) & propeller, HGW belts & stencils, Barracuda Wheels, and a load of scratchbuilding! I did some super-detailing on the engine, cowl flaps, canopy fittings, and wheel bays. It is a fictional scheme from a Guadalcanal based unit, flown by the fictional Lt M. W. Hendrik. I hope you enjoy my build, I had great fun with the weathering on this one. I have come to love dirty aircraft and learned a good deal of new techniques for this plane (still not so great at them!). On to the pictures!
    52 points
  28. Pete Fleischmann

    HH-60G Pavehawk

    Hey all- Here are a few shots of the completed Pavehawk. Link to build is here: Build link to the figures is here: Figures I started the figures before I had the kit. The first post about the figures was 25 April 2019- a two year project from start to finish. Following photos were shot by Rick Ciaburri: thanks for looking! cheers Pete
    52 points
  29. Pictures only ... WIP LINK
    52 points
  30. Hello all, This is my attempt at the Revell kit with Quickboost exhaust, Eduard set and HGH Seat belts Paints: model master and AK real colors. This was the first-time using AK paints since I cannot get the model master any longer. With that said, I really enjoyed using the AK and have started to buy more. The decals came from one of the Kagero books. I also riveted the skin. Thanks for looking. Rod
    51 points
  31. Hello friends, wanted to let you participate to my latest work, I think it's worth it, it's not a subject we see very often... so enjoy...or not.. ciao Serge
    51 points
  32. After a very long time I’ve finally managed to build something from start to finish. I was extremely excited when I heard that Meng was releasing this kit as I was sure the WnWs DR.1 was not to be. It was definitely on my “must have” list” when it was released and it was, IMHO, worth the wait! I hope you enjoy the pics. Cheers, Wolf With some WnWs stablemates! Thanks for lookin’.
    51 points
  33. I actually wrapped this one up today, and took some pics outside in the sun. It was a bit windy, so I may try some later without the white background when I'm sure it will be safe. As there is very little info available on these planes, I took some liberties. Here is the basic premise: - This plane (red 20, 196th IAP)) seems to be the only M-105 Klimov plane consistently depicted in model kits and renderings, though no photos of it seem to exist. I chose to do it because at least I am reasonably certain it actually existed. - As these were lend-lease aircraft, I assumed this one would have been delivered to the Soviets in standard 3 color USAAF colors with US stars (no bars) on them, so I first painted it in that scheme - dark green/brown camo upper surfaces, neutral gray undersides, green zinc chromate pit and insides. No U.S. ARMY lettering on the bottom, as they seemed to have stopped doing this by the E models. - I assumed that the Russians would have then painted over the US stars with whatever paint they had, so a darker shade of green over the wing top and fuselage stars, and russian underside blue on the wing bottom, with a brush, so crude circles. - Then Russian red stars on the wings and fuselage over the painted out US insignia where it occurred. I also assumed the plane would have then seen service for a time before the engine wore out. - At this point, the plane would have had the engine replaced with the M-105 Klimov, and assigned to the 196th IAP. - At some point after that, the 196th painted over everything with white, including the fuselage star, and replaced the star with a red number, painting a new star on the tail. It would then have seen service until it met it's end or the the war did, whichever came first. Eduard Brassin wheels and tires Scratch built upper front engine cowl and exhaust, cast in resin Spinner and prop from Special Hobby Yak-3 kit (heavily modified and also cast in resin) RB seatbelts Hope you like! Tim
    51 points
  34. P-47D-40RA, Big Stud Coll. Robert Baseler, 325th FG kit: Hasegawa engine: Quickboost cockpit: Aires wheel Bay: Aires wheel: Barracuda studio stencils: HGW Decals: Cartograf Masks: home made paint: Alclad II, Gunze C Photo: my good frend Miloslav(thank you)
    51 points
  35. My first finished model in this year. Revell kit 1/32 Aires cockpit, Eduard wheels, HGW riveting set, wet transfers, seat belts, Barracuda exhaust & decals Montex mask, All colours MRP
    50 points
  36. After building my Italeri CF-104 Starfighter, I took a break from modeling for a few weeks, to recharge my Modeling Mojo and also allow the parts for this new build to come in from all over Europe and the US, while researching all I could about the Hellcat. While I usually build a prop after a jet, I wanted to try something a bit different from my prior prop builds and I also wanted to build a kit a bit better made than the last 4 kits I made, of the 1/32 Kitty Hawk F-5E, Kitty Hawk T-6/Harvard, Special Hobby Tempest Mk V and the Italeri Zipper. While none of these kits were horrible (F-5E came close), I spent a lot of my time and effort to get these models lifted up to the average level first, before I could even dream of “kicking them up a notch” to the next level of detail. This time I wanted a model kit that was good or great to begin with, so that I could concentrate on super detailing it instead. After looking at many reviews of this kit and a few builds, this appeared to be the ticket, especially in big 1/24 scale. I have to admit, I’m not really a big fan of the Hellcat from an artistic perspective. It has none of the graceful lines of the Mustang or Spitfire and looks a bit like a Pot-bellied Pig. It was lethal though and accomplished its main mission, which was to shoot down and destroy Japanese aircraft. According to the Kinzey book I’m using as my main reference, of 6,477 kills scored by Navy and Marine pilots, 3 out of every 4 were made by the Hellcat and they had a 19 to 1 kill ratio. Pretty impressive Pig! I built an A-10C Warthog for my son a few years ago that I wasn’t all that fond of at first either, but by the end when I got to appreciate how purpose built it was, I became a big fan and it is now one of my favorite models today. I’m sure I’ll feel the same way about the Hellcat when I’m finished this model as well. As usual, I bought as many aftermarket parts as I could as follows: · Airfix 1/24 Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat Kit, A19004 · Aerocraft Brass Landing Gear · Airscale Instrument Panel · ANYZ Spark Plugs and Wiring set, AN011, AN013, AN015, AN016, AN017 · ANYZ Dials, Knobs, Switches and Cockpit Handles. AN028, AN029, AN030 · HGW Seatbelts, 124511 · Barracuda Diamond Tread Tires/wheels, BR24412 · Eduard Wheel Bay Detail Set, EDU23035 · Eduard Canopy Masks, LX006 · DN Models Paint Masks for Insignias, Letters and Numbers · DN Models Paint Masks for Canopy, Wheels, Lights · Fundekals Grumman F-6F-5 Hellcat Decals · * A Boatload of 3D Printed Interior Details from Italy · Reference Book: Detail & Scale, F6F Hellcat, by Bert Kinzey and Chris Sakal Here’s a few selected pics of some of this aftermarket, and a few explanations that go with them. The Main Kit of course. The box is huge at 26” X 14” and it has almost 600 parts! More on the kit later. Airscale PE Instrument Panel. Pure precision like anything from Peter Castle, who wouldn’t take my money and refunded it! While not all that surprising coming from Peter, the gesture is much appreciated, so I’ll try to do my best to make it look good sir. No pressure! Aerocraft brass landing gear. I’m not sure if this is required due to the weight, but the casting is beautiful and strong, while revised resin gear doors are added, that accommodate the changes made to the brass detail which is slightly different than the kit parts. ANYZ Engine Detail Set, which isn’t truly an actual set made just for the Airfix PW R2800 Double Wasp Engine, but a collection of ANYZ parts that are needed to super detail an already terrific looking engine. HGW cloth seat belts and Barracuda resin wheels. While the kit seatbelts are all plastic and so-so, the tires are 2-piece, so you will be dealing with seam lines down the middle of the diamond tread, which will be difficult to fill without making the tires smooth all around. You can see quite a bit of the landing gear bays at this large scale, so the Eduard PE set should enhance them further. DN Models Paint Masks. I plan to paint all the big insignias and numbers, while any added masks are welcome for other hard to mask parts. I have the Fundekals Hellcat decals coming soon, which will be used for all smaller items like stencils, etc. Now a very big surprise! Several weeks ago when I first started researching this project, “Giovanni” from Italy contacted me and said that he wanted to send me some resin parts for this new project. I was hesitant at first, because I wanted to get going on this model and what if I didn’t like or use the parts? After some back and forth by email, Giovanni sent me some pics of what was coming, which convinced me to stop my assembly of the cockpit parts and wait for what he was sending me. Again like Peter, he wouldn’t let me pay for anything, including shipping by UPS which is expensive from Italy. A few days ago, I received all these parts at my doorstep from “Adriatic Models”. Adriatic doesn’t have a website yet, but Giovanni thinks they will by May sometime. I will let you know when it's up. Here is the rear wall behind the seat, which is apparently “Station 52 ½”, with the kit part on the left and the resin replacement on the right. I was going to trim off the kit lines that look a bit too perfect and add my own anyway, while there are a few obvious changes like the detailed junction box and the big knobs on either side. Since these parts are 3D printed, they need a light sanding, so rivet detail was not added as strong as the kit parts and I can easily add some Archer decal rivets once the surface is smooth. This part also comes with 3 different headrest/shields, for a 3 series Hellcat, early 5 and late 5. This is the firewall behind the engine, with the kit part again on the left. Apparently the engine mount is a tube and not a rectangular recess, so if you’re a purist, you can modify the kit parts to go into these holes instead. I’ll pass on this one, because engine mount strength is more important to me than accuracy. Giovanni also tells me that that box on the lower right of the kit part shouldn't be there, because it was moved on all 5's. Now things start to get really confusing with all sorts of parts. Giovanni has sent me several pics of where most of this stuff goes, but I’m still doing research and learning. Note the 2 additional headrests, with super fine “towel bars” for the fabric seat belts. I have left all the parts in their plastic cases for now, to protect them and avoid losing any. More gizmos and more questions. This is sort of like solving a complicated puzzle, but I can say this: Each part is super detailed and quite strong. Lots of little hand wheels and connectors, much like the ANYZ parts. Of course I will only be using a few of these, so I will still have a great selection for "the stash" when I'm done. Now some observations about the kit itself. As mentioned above there are a LOT of parts, almost 600 of them. Generally speaking, the parts look good to excellent and while seam lines and pin marks are still there everywhere, they should be able to be cleaned up without too much effort. This kit is famous for it’s “oil-can” stressed panel lines on the fuselage and wings which I really like. What I don’t like, is that all large parts are quite rough and require a lot of sanding, which is going to be very difficult to do without removing nice surface detail, like fasteners. Here’s an example of a fuselage part, which is typical of all the wing parts as well. While I can sand this down, I have to be careful to sand it in an up and down motion, to reduce the removal of the subtle panel lines that are slightly raised ridges with rivets on them. Other large surfaces with raised detail will be much more difficult to do. After a sanding session. Much better, but still not good enough. This is going to take a long time to do properly and explains why a few builds of this kit have rough paint. Not this one if I can help it! This is the rear of the firewall, so the upper pin marks will be hidden behind the IP, while most of the others need to be filled, which are pretty darn big. Most of the other parts have the pin marks on the side that likely doesn't show, but the top of the main seat does. Really? So avoidable. Build Strategy This model comes in 4 configurations, although only the first 3 are mentioned. 1. Flying, Wheels Up 2. Standing, Wings Down 3. Standing, both Wings Folded 4. Standing, 1 Wing Folded I plan on super detailing the cockpit and engine and when the Hellcat wings are folded, you can barely see into the cockpit, so with all the detail I plan to do in there, the wings must lay flat. The gun bays on the wings can be exposed and are highly detailed, but after doing that on my Tamiya P-51D Mustang, I kind of regret it. The open doors kill the contours of the wings and those panels are always in the way or falling off. No exposed guns, other than what’s poking out the front, because I will have enough other detail in other areas already. I also plan on building this model “Smart”. For some reason, this model has many, many parts that go behind the seat wall and beneath the cockpit floor. Without doing major modifications and opening up panels, you will never see any of it once you close up the fuselage. I’ve seen several other builds of this kit where the modeler followed the instructions and added all this stuff, only to wave goodbye to it all later, which to me is a big waste of time and effort. Here is a good example of it in Step 27. All that stuff on the left behind the seat will be buried- and there’s lots more than this like radios and other items in Step 32, and Step 39- Step 41! I’m not doing it. For other areas like the wings, I will only add those parts that hold the guns in place, because all those cross members will never be seen again as well. If you can't see it or need it for other construction steps, I'm leaving it out. With a bit of a game plan established, I cleaned up and trimmed all the kit cockpit parts from Steps 1 to 39. I didn’t glue too many of them together yet, for ease of painting and the fact that the Adriatic resin parts were coming soon. This involved many hours of trimming and sanding, but nothing extraordinary, which is a nice change from my recent builds. I got a good start on the Airscale IP as well. Here are most of the parts, which attach to the clear kit Part R3 at the bottom. I cut the optional acetate parts, which will be sandwiched between the IP decals and the outside panel to give the instruments a glass-like look. All surface detail should be sanded off R3 before the PE part is glued to it later. Instead of painting the PE parts and adding the decals first as instructed, I glued the main IP parts to R3 first for ease of handling. After painting all the parts black, the decals will be added to the flat backings, the acetate will be added, then front bezels will be glued to the front. Along the way I will using dull coat and dry brushing to make them look more worn and realistic. Note that there is a handle slot on the lower left of the PE IP, that should be opened with a hot knife or similar method. The decision to use the Airscale panel on the right side is a tough one, because to do so, you need to remove and save all the fine switches, then glue them back on later. Good luck with that. I decided to do it anyway, thinking I would find switch replacements someplace else. I also filled in the gauge dial recesses, which do not align with the PE part perfectly. Here is that right panel dry fit on the kit parts on the right, while the left panel has been glued to the kit parts which covers a big seam. Holes were drilled for future knobs and switches, which I have now sourced from ANYZ, so what appeared to be a big problem with their replacement is now easy, so I’m glad I took the plunge. The central console Part D34 under the IP was a bit trickier to decide, because the PE part isn’t wildly better, except at the bottom. It’s also a bit different if that look is what you’re after. For this one I compromised, cutting the bottom of the PE off and gluing it to the kit part with a little trimming to both parts. I also sanded the interior of the gauge at the top, to prep it for a future gauge decal So I’ve finally got this model on the go! Having said that, this model is going to take a long, long time to complete. Between distractions like a ruptured Appendix last Monday and a stay in the hospital and the fact that the weather is starting to warm up a bit, I expect this build will be at a snails pace until October, when progress should really pick up substantially like it usually does. Another big thanks to Peter Castle and Giovanni! You guys are the greatest, so I’ll try my best to make your parts really “pop” in this model for all to see. Cheers, Chuck
    50 points
  37. I’ve become very interested in the early years of the Pacific campaign, so after my Wake Island Wildcat I decided to build an SBD that flew out of Guadalcanal. This build took 14 months to complete and, if you’re interested, the build thread is HERE. This is a nice kit, but it sure reinforces the Trumpeter A-team, B-team theory. The cockpit, engine and smaller parts/assemblies are easy and well engineered. The fuselage and especially the cowling do present some challenges which are detailed in the build thread. Aftermarket parts were limited to the Eduard Interior placards, Archer Rivet Skins and data stencil decals. Other than that I made the seatbelts out of paper using the kit PE hardware (despite it’s poor detail) and my own decals with lacquer and masks I cut on my Silhouette 3 and clear decal film. Again, the process to do this is detailed in the build thread. I used AK Real Colors for the Blue and Gray and Mr.Color for everything else - all lacquer and all weathering was done with oils. Okay, enough blathering, here’s the glamor shots: Inspired by: Thanks for looking!
    50 points
  38. A few pictures of the newly completed P-51, this time version D-5 ... The kit pleasantly surprised me with its quality details and relaxed assembly.From the details I added rivet lines for the fuselage,horizontal stabilizer and flaps,propeller cone, radio with accumulator and rear view mirror I designed as a 3D models, which I then printed out on a 3D printer,I made wiring from the lead wires in the landing gear bay, cables from the radio station and fuel pipes for additional tanks, the cockpit was supplemented with belts for the pilot's seat and the spur was replaced wheel for resin from Eduard and that's all, so the construction is almost a box...NMF surface is sprayed with Alclad II, other colors I used: Tamiya acrilic, MRP, Humbrol and Valejo..I used heavy diluted acrylic Tamiya and watercolor to illustrate the weathering, wash - Tamiya accent line color + Promodeller.National marking and other markings are a combination of my own masks and decals from the kit. As a final varnish I used a mixture of Sidolux - glossy warnish for wooden floor and Flat base from Tamiya, which created a semi-gloss final effect. The model represents the P-51 D-5 serial 44-13334 from the RAF Leiston base, whose pilot was in July 1944 Capt.Calvert L.Williams 362nd.FS / 357th.FG ....
    50 points
  39. Here is my completed RAAF P-40N, depicted in the last months of WW2. This aircraft was originally flown by the C/O of 75 Sqn, Squadron Leader Clive Toldhurst but appeared to be taken over by Squadron Leader Alan Thomson after he was posted to 75Sqn, becoming the acting Commanding Officer. I managed to find a fair bit of information about Alan, including many pics of him flying `Hep Cat' (G) and also many pages of his logbook. I have spliced these pages together, made them clearer and have included some of them here. They show the many combat missions that he flew in it and show his affection for this particular aircraft. The notes on the right side of each page make for some fascinating reading and give a unique insight into what it must have been like flying combat missions in the pacific, as well as the wind down after the war in which he continued to fly this aircraft. As can be seen in his logbook, danger was always close, even after the war finished. A bio of Alan: Alan Thomson was born in Brisbane on 13 May 1920, and grew up in Brisbane and Bundaberg. He was educated at Brisbane and Ascot State Schools, and then Brisbane Grammar School. He left school before matriculation and joined the Commonwealth Bank, starting as a junior clerk at Brisbane's Queen Street branch. In the late 1930s he enrolled in a weekend flying course run by the Queensland Aero Club at Archerfield, during which time he logged up some three and a half hours flying time with an instructor. He joined the RAAF in July 1940 and attended 2 ITS Bradfield Park, 6 EFTS Tamworth, and 3 SFTS Amberley, before being posted to 1 BAGS Evans Head, where he spent over a year, clocking up 580 hours on Fairey Battles. He was posted to 2 OTU Mildura in September 1942, where he carried out conversion to P-40 Kittyhawks. His first operational posting was to 76 Squadron at Strauss, Northern Territory in late November of the same year. Japanese intrusion over the Northern Territory at this time was sporadic at best, and 76 Squadron along with 77 Squadron (Kittyhawks) saw little action, although each squadron was to claim one aircraft destroyed each. He was to stay with 76 Squadron for almost a year, following them to deployments at Onslow, Bankstown, Milne Bay and front line deployments to Goodenough and Kirriwina Islands. He then spent all of 1944 as an instructor at 2 OTU Mildura, and in early 1945 attended the RAAF Staff School at Mt Martha, Victoria. In late May he was posted to 75 Squadron (Kittyhawks) and became acting C/O of the squadron during its move from Morotai to Tarakan in late June 1945, and subsequent operations during the Borneo campaign. On 29 October, some six weeks after the Japanese surrender, Alan was involved in a serious landing accident. Suffering from his burns and shock he was evacuated to Brisbane, where he spent several months in hospital undergoing treatment for his burns. He was discharged from the RAAF on 18 April 1946. He was awarded a DFC promulgated in the London Gazette on 25 June 1946, and received the following citation: "Flight Lieutenant Thomson has completed two tours of operations against the enemy from the Trobriand Islands and Borneo, displaying daring and ability and keenness to destroy the enemy. He has participated in 29 sorties and 26 strikes and the successful results achieved by No. 75 Squadron, operating from Tarakan, are largely due to the courage and determination displayed by him. Flight Lieutenant Thomson has led his squadron on many successful strikes against the strongly defended Samarinda area with utter disregard for personal safety". After leaving the RAAF Alan returned to the Commonwealth Bank but never again flew another aircraft. Although he did retain a lifelong interest in aircraft and aviation. Alan passed away in 2002. The model: Eduard boxing of the Hasegawa kit. Modifications/additions: I elected not to use most of the included photo etch. Brengun aftermarket gunsight. Music wire front bead gunsight. Scratchbuilt brake lines, undercarriage extended inticators, whip antenna and fuel drain pipe lower fuselage. RB Productions paper seatbelts. Paint and markings: Gunze Sangyo acrylics Custom designed masks for the nose art, serials, squadron codes and roundels. A picture that I have wanted to do ever since I found out that there were two Hep Cats!
    50 points
  40. Tamiya Model HGW wet transfers, seat belts, stencils Barracuda wheels Eduard instrument panel & engine cowling set Grey Matter Figures Engine bay All colours MRP
    49 points
  41. Hi All This is the Tamiya 1/32 F-16C in the colors of the VENOM - Viper Demo Team. I don´t often do demo schemes but this one was just too good to pass up I used quite a few extra bits; Aires Wheelbay + additional wiring Aires Exhaust Quinta Studios Cockpit Kopecky LAU 129 wingtip rails Model Maker Decal & Paint Mask set Bandit Resin Factory Travel Pod The Aires Wheelbay is a drop-in fit and essential for any F-16 build in my opinion. Its inexpensive and is almost an exact replica of the real thing. Just amazing! I wanted to try out the Quinta Studios Cockpit resin decals. At first I was a bit underwhelmed as with the colored PE. Looks good in pictures but...mjah. The trick is to give it a layer of flat varnish. It just changes everything and enhances all the details. Makes it look very realistic. Judge for yourselves - I combined it with a few details of my own and some careful brush painting. As the Venom Demo Viper never flies with anything on the wingtips, the new empty LAU-129 Rails from Kopecky Models came out at just the right time - The detail just blew my mind - take a look at his stuff - its just incredible. The Paint Mask set is really nice. I was very concerned that the emblem on the tail would curl up on itself but it turned out to be very rigid and could even be moved around just holding it with a pair of pliers. It just looks really cool painted on. The decals are extremely thin and prone to curling in on themselves though - I had to order a second set to finish the build Take a look - Hope you like it (If you click the images they will open in a bigger version) Thanks for looking Niels
    49 points
  42. Fw-190 from Hasegawa. Added Yahu IP, seatbelts, Montex Masks, resin exhaust plus little bit of work with seat, wheels and other stuff. Enjoy!
    49 points
  43. One of my favorite jets this time. A-6E Intruder Trumpeter 1:32. The model, as always, is made straight from the box without any additional resins. The model is quite difficult to make, but it is still one of the best Trumpeter models in 1:32 scale
    49 points
  44. Hi guys! Been a member for a LONG time, but this is actually my first post! Hope you like it! This is the ancient Tamiya 1/32 F-14A from 1994. This was a 9 years build, but to be honest about 8,5 of it was as a shelf queen, because it drained all my mojo.... Anyway, enough excuses.... Kit: Tamiya Scale: 1/32 Extras used: Technics F-14B airframe conversion, Trumpeter Laser Guide practice bombs and TER, Fightertown decals and LOTS of scratch Paints: Tamiya, Mr. Hobby colors, Vallejo Metal Colour, AK Xtreme metal Weathering: Abteilung 502's, Flory models wash Hope you liked it!! SORRY for the looooooong post!!
    49 points
  45. March 4/21 Well at long last, I’ve finally finished adding the entire second HGW decal rivets sheet, which combined with the first sheet is 9,460 rivets. With a few throwaways during my second decaling session, there’s at least 9,300 of them, which isn’t all that impressive considering how tiny they are. What is impressive- and a TON of work!- is that I estimate that I cut out and added over 600 tiny decal pieces. The math here is that each strand is 172mm and there are 22 strands per sheet, for a total of 3,784mm per sheet, X 2 sheets = 7,568mm. Most of the decals I added ranged from 5-15mm, for an average of likely 12mm, or 630 of them. The reason for so many is that strands over 15mm were very hard to handle and place straight before they wouldn’t move anymore, so you need to move quickly with smaller pieces, which made it much simpler, but also very time consuming. Over 4 days I bet I put in at least 30 hours, so I’m very glad it’s finally over! Anyway, here’s another pic of what the decal strands should look like while they dry, ideally for 6-8 hours. With Microsol releasing the glue underneath the film, it should look a little messy, which means the glue is working and it all wipes off easily with a damp rag after the film has been removed. I am also very happy to report that I lost hardly any rivets on the starboard side, so the liberal use of Microsol was the key. They are also surprisingly tough! I didn't lose one rivet to being rubbed off with my hands. And when it’s finished. I added a bunch more of them to the port side…. And a bit of a walkaround if you want to use my positioning of rivet strands for future reference. They aren’t perfect by any means, but I think they are about 80% accurate. I think this added fine detail tones down the large panel lines and averages the overall look to something more realistic. And the other side. Remember, much of the recessed fastener detail doesn’t show until it’s painted, so you are only seeing about 2/3’s of this detail. I’m pretty happy with the result, despite all the extra work. Next step is what the heck do I use to create a metallic polished aluminum finish and still be able to apply decals to it? I found that some of the spoons that I painted earlier with several shades of Alclad had already started to discolor and stain a bit due to handling with my oily fingers. You guessed it, it was all the shiny ones like Chrome and Airframe Aluminum, while the Chrome for Lexan just about rubbed off completely, which isn’t too surprising since it’s not really meant for outside surfaces. This got me to thinking that the main reason why the High Shine Alclad paints are not recommended for masking tape and decal solutions, is because they don’t bite into the primer coat like the other darker shades of Alclad. They smell lighter too, so the thinner in them is less “hot”, rendering them more fragile. So what if I added Tamiya lacquer thinner to them? This thinner bites into the Tamiya gloss black lacquer, so maybe High Shine Alclads will work better if mixed with lacquer thinner. So I did another experiment and while I was at it, I added some Alclad Chrome to X-22 clear coat, to see what it would look like. Here are the results, which turned out pretty good and better than expected. Alclad will indeed thin with Tamiya lacquer thinner, with only a slight reduction in shine. The Chrome + X-22 was a bust, however, because the metallic particles just float in the clear coat, creating a metallic flake shine with poor coverage over the black undercoat. It looks kind of cool if I was painting a car, but I’m painting a jet instead. So after the paint dried for an hour, I rubbed the spoons with my fingers and found that the finish did not rub off as easily as it did before, so I was excited that maybe I had made a discovery. You can Mask this paint and not worry about it lifting, but what about decals and decal solutions? Here are the two spoons again, but with a kit decal with decal solutions on the left and just a drop of Microsol applied to the right spoon. The clear film under the decal turned a bit cloudy, while just the drop of Microsol ate right through the paint. Dang! Back to the drawing board! With all the extensive work I have put into this model adding decal rivets and the disturbing results of decal solutions above, I have no choice but to go with a clear coat, even if it does knock down the shine. A decal solution mark on top of all this work is a disaster to be avoided at all costs! Since X-22 worked fairly well on my P-38L build, I’m now going with that and since it knocks down the shine a bit, I should start off with as shiny a finish as possible as follows: Apply Alclad Chrome to everything. It’s a bit too bright and shiny, but I need to overdo it first, then let the clear coat knock this down a bit which also changes the color darker Spray a thin coat of Tamiya X-22 to everything. This will allow masking and the application of decals Paint specific panels darker shades of Aluminum and Stainless Steel, etc., to replicate references and add some interesting complexity Paint specific fuselage details like antennae, which are dirty yellow/orange, and red around fuel caps Add all the decals, being careful to minimize decal film Seal in the decals with more X-22. This should help eliminate decal film edges Weather the paint here and there, including adding “scratches” by dry brushing metallic washes So here is the first coat of Alclad Chrome on everything. Remember, it’s supposed to be too bright at first! Note the subtle “oil-canning” of the engine area, caused by the internal detail of the fuselage parts. Pretty cool, considering I did nothing special to retain it..... I was also pleased to see the tiny rivets on the rectangular panels on the spine still showed up through the thin paint. Now you can see the recessed detail show up alongside the slightly raised detail, which gives it a more interesting and complex look. I spy a little decal film remaining on one corner of the gun/fuel door above the fuel cap. VERY easy to do, since the film is almost invisible. Thankfully, it's an easy fix. While some might think the rivets are raised too much They are very subtle, as shown when you let light reflect off the panels. Almost invisible from this angle.... I love these last 3 shots…. I am SO glad all this rivet detail is over, but by what I see, I think it was well worth the effort! Cheers, Chuck
    49 points
  46. CZPetrP

    MiG-15 BIS 1/32HPH

    Hello everbody I'm new here. My friend Miloslav persuaded me to register ... MiG-15 BIS 1/32 HPH First Fighter Regiment, Planá Air Force Base, Lt. Kotrsal, First Squadron, 1954 Photos: Miloslav (thank you) More photos here: https://www.leteckemuzeumliborezy.cz/mig-15/
    49 points
  47. Here it is, finally i finished this kit, so far the best HH-60G kit in the market, figures are from Live Resin
    49 points
  48. Hi everyone, This is the Revell 1/32 F-4E kit with some aftermarket help from GT Resin in the form of exhausts, belly strap and intakes, new nose from Sierra Hotel, Aim-9Js from Cutting Edge and a cockpit from Legend. The aim was to depict a late 70's USAFE jet from the 50TFW at Hahn AFB using AirDoc decals, put her in-flight and add some lighting to bring her to life. This was sort of a learning project for me, picking up on the excellent tips found in this forum, trying out some new techniques and learning from my mistakes (of which I made a few - see build for details!). In the end it took 2 and a half years to complete so the ratio of builds to acquires is way out of kilter. Anyway, on to the pics... And with lights on... Overall, a challenging but fun build of the impressive Phantom! Build thread is here ... https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/58988-132-revell-f-4e-what-could-possibly-go-wrong/&page=1 Many thanks for looking!
    49 points
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