Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/19/2021 in all areas

  1. Hello all I brought this one across the finish line just before New Years but I only had time to take some pictures now. (For the Photo Geeks amongst us, I used a Canon EOS 5Ds with a 24-105mm L lens and a 80x80x80cm lightbox) The kit was my first full blown resin kit and it was a little intimidating to say the least. Up until now I did not enjoy using large amounts of CA glue but it has been a good experience. The fit is overall very good, especially between the 3D printed parts. It is a big heavy model but the landing gear (3D printed as one piece) is very sturdy and supports the model very well indeed. How great is it to have a 1/32 JA37 Viggen! - now bring on the Draken!! Enjoy /Niels
    55 points
  2. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    hello everyone No way of dressing it up, but I have changed subject again... I will go back to the Fairey Firefly - this is it's second time of falling out of favour, but when you get the urge what do you do? My new flame is the early longnose P40. I have always thought it would make a good subject for me and very nearly started one after my P51, but didn't fancy another American aircraft in quick succession. It's easy to see why.. ..beautiful lines, natural metal and technically interesting. This is G-CIIO operated by The Fighter Collection who have said I can come and take at look at her once we are into the New Year and assuming there is no covid funny business preventing a visit... I have spent the last month or so researching and finding out about the airframe and the differences with the later short nose P40s and the earlier P36 - of which there are many. I also liked the timing with the GWH 1/32 kit coming out as folks will be talking P40's for a bit I had Jumpeii Temmas plans scaled and corresponded with Witold Jaworski who has digitally modelled the P40C and had done loads of research and analysis of factory drawings One thing I really looked forward to was doing what I did with my P51 and getting stuck into those drawings to replicate everything part by part. This was always something that hindered the Firefly, I just don't like working in a vacuum, I like the research and knowing what I am making is accurate An example like this - here is the tailwheel door in the parts manual.. ..I can find the part number and in Aircorps Library, look up the drawings.. ..then scale and copy the drawings to make up a set of photo-etch parts.. ..I did this hundereds of times and now have the mother of all PE sheets at 28cm by 47cm with everything I thought I could do in PE represented.. i thought I would base the model on the 21st Century Toys 'model' as I did with their Fw190D -this was on the basis that while it is a toy, the 190 was dimensionally pretty accurate.. So a trip to ebay and £160 lighter, one turned up.. Once the 'model' arrived I set about destroying it into it's component parts - this involved sawing some of the nose elements in half so I ended up with effectively two fuselage halves.. cue the first plan comparison and a very deflated feeling... ..it's too short, too narrow, has what looks like the late chin profile and is generally all over the place.. ..the rear fuselage is particularly out.. ..now, I did toy with the idea of just getting on with reworking it, but the more I looked, the more work I found - in the end I was trying to justify it because I had spent the money.. In the end, I bit the bullet and decided to scratch build it - I have no excuse - I have great drawings and having just scratchbuilt a Hawker Fury so feeling pretty confident.. ..first step was to get a sheet of perspex acrylic to trace out a 'keel'... ..I used a scalpel to score the perspex - you may juts be able to see some of the station lines here (on the red line).. ..once I had all the station points and outlines done, I used a jigsaw and a cutting disc to cut out the profile - with a big bit missing for where the cockpit is.. ..this again told me how out of whack the 21st Century Toys model is.. ..using Jumpeii's profiles I cut out all the fuselage station formers.. ..and cemented them in place using a mini set square.. ..then I soldered some square brass stock to get the dihedral right for wings to slide into - there is a little perspex jig holding it upright inbetween them.. ..they were epoxied in place with the smaller sliding box sections in place so the angles and dangles can be seen and the positioning made correct.. ..so there we are - thousands of hours of work to go, but it feels good to have something fresh on the bench and thats what it's all about right? TTFN Peter
    50 points
  3. Hi All Well, I guess I am suffering a bit from "Post-Viggen Blues" - I cannot really seem to chose what to build next. I am pretty sure it will be one of my numerous F-16 projects.. In the mean time I uploaded a few pictures of, what turned out to be a productive corona-lock-down-year of Modern Jets for me. I build everything from all eras but it seems to come in waves for me. With the Border Model Lancaster hopefully arriving in a couple of months, I think 2022 will be "The year of the Lancaster" First up is the 1/32 Kitty Hawk Mirage 2000C (OOB) in a special livery. Its a really nice and detailed kit but bit of a pain to build. Next up is the 1/32 Italeri Tornado GR.4. backdated to a GR.1. - I added the Aires Cockpit, Wolfpack Seats and a set of JP233´s I had from Paragon Designs (I think) The kit was bit of a letdown for me if I am honest but it is still better than the Revell Kit. Next in line is a project I wanted to do for quite some time. It is the Tamiya 1/32 F-4E converted to an F-4G. I used the GT Resin conversion kit but that was a disaster. Very very disappointed with the casting quality of that. The cockpit tub was unusable and so was a number of the other parts. I ended up scratch building quite a bit but I like how it turned out. Weapons are from Eduard Brassin. I also found time to complete my 1/32 Trumpeter A-6E Intruder (carry-over from 2020). I know most people would fill in all those rivets but I quite like the look of them. This was my first time using the cockpit decals from ANYZ, and wow! Never again without Bombs are from VideoAviation Lastly I spent quite some time building a 1/32 Trumpeter F-14A Tomcat. I cannot have a 1/32 collection without building a VF-84 Tomcat - I was a teenager in the 80´s and this is what a Tomcat looked like I added the Aires Cockpit and weapons are from Eduard Brassin (it also has a full load of AIM-54´s). Next Tomcat I will use the Zacto Model intakes. Decals are from HAD Models ...and of course the Viggen Hope you like them Niels
    44 points
  4. The OA-4M has a different front IP which was 3D printed - on my old Photon back in the day. The part would look better on a 4K or 8K for sure, but those were not yet available back in the day. The photo nicely shows the difference between a part printed flat (on the left) and a part printed at an angle. Eduard offers very nice and useful PE parts for the Trumpeter kits. Whilst I was too stupid to use the ones for the slat recesses, I managed to fit the vortex generators on the wings and slats. They are a huge improvement over the rather rough kit details. After a bit of tidying up, the model was primed and painting could start. As usual, I have used FS36375 and FS36325 from MRP; unlike most TPS Scooters, the aircraft I am building does not seem to have FS36495 undersides. This is the aircraft I'd likle to build - BuNo 154306, one of two TPS Scooters with black markings, flown by MAG-32 in 1990. Sadly, there are very few photos of these aircraft - there are only three I know of, including this one (Official Navy photo - source: Wikimedia Commons). All markings will be painted using custom masks. I'll need decals for some small details.
    35 points
  5. The well-known trumpeter kit with the following after market accessories Cockpit by red fox Static dischargers by Master Decal stencls by Begemot Wheels by Armory Pitot tube by Master Mask by Montex Enjections seat by Quick Boost Antenas by Quick Boost Detail set by Aires Nose cone by Zacto models Colours by AKAN
    34 points
  6. Evening folks, A long overdue update on the Sunderland... The last few weeks have been spent adding some of the finer details to the model as I prepare it for paint. The last major job was to add the cockpit glazing which is always a nerve-wracking experience as I regularly ruin canopies with wayward glue-sodden fingers and a host of other mishaps. However, this time things proceeded smoothly - the canopy itself was an excellent fit and the whole process was remarkably trouble free! First job was to add the previously completed flightdeck details: Then the canopy itself was attached by holding it in place with tape and running Tamiya Extra Thin around the mating surfaces: This was allowed to set for 24 hours and then I carefully masked the areas in need of protecting before blending the clear piece in with Milliput Fine: When complete, the windows were marked out and cut from Tamiya tape before the whole cockpit area got a spray of RAF grey/green to ensure the frames are the correct colour when viewed from inside. I also attached the astrodome and DF loop which was a spare from and HK B-17: With that done, other smaller details were made and added such as the leading edge landing lights on the port wing (these will be fitted and painted after the main paint job is completed), the tip lights were made from clear sprue sanded to shape and the various other access panels were either sribed on or made from thin Evergreen strip: The early Sunderlands were festooned with various aerials for sub-hunting and these have been made from various pieces of sprue and Evergreen - I have fitted those on the top of rear fuselage as they shouldn't get damaged but the remainder will be done after painting: A beautiful set of 3D-printed wheels have also arrived to complete the hone-made beaching gear: So the airframe is now more or less ready for a mammoth session in the paint booth - you'll notice I've already sprayed her flanks in Medium Sea Grey in preparation for masking off the codes on her sides: Speaking of paint - my go-to brand is Xtracolor's enamel range and I'm stocked up and ready to go! I may be a while but I'll be sure to update you when she's in her new dress. All the best, Tom
    34 points
  7. finally finished it!! merry christmas and a happy and better 2022
    34 points
  8. Tolga ULGUR

    My 2021 builds

    Hello everyone, Here is my 2021 build list in chronological order. In advance, Happy new year to all 1- 1/32 Hasegawa – Grey Matter P-40L Warhawk 2- 1/32 Hasegawa Focke Wulf FW 190F-8 3- 1/32 PCM Spitfire Mk.XIVe 4- 1/48 Hasegawa TF-104G 5- 1/32 Hasegawa Spitfire MK.IIa 6- 1/32 Dragon Messerschmitt Bf 109E-7Trop 7- 1/32 Dragon Messerschmitt Bf-110D 8- 1/32 Hasegawa P-40N Warhawk 9- 1/32 Hasegawa Messerschmitt Bf-109G 6 10- 1/32 Special Hobby Hawker Tempest Mk.V 11- 1/32 Hasegawa P-40E Warhawk 12- 1/32 Special Hobby Westland Whirlwind Mk.1 13- 1/32 Hasegawa P-40N Warhawk
    33 points
  9. Hi everyone, 16 years ago as a London Baptist Pastor I moonlighted in my spare time my AIMS hobby. Shortly after releasing the Ju 88 G-6 conversion I presented as best I could the Mistel S3. The resin parts were mostly solid due to the limitations of the equipment I had back then and sadly also the first batch included vacform parts that were not provided to me in UV resistant Pet G as requested and so over the years turned yellow. Well fast forward a few years and I started being able to cast thinner and hollow parts and anyone that contacted me about the yellow vacforms got replacements but the years and many many models shows have not been kind to the poor old girl and so during this time while I am away from AIMS recovering from hand and elbow surgery it is time for a re-think! The 1/32 AIMS Mistel S3 had been made purely for display purposes with no fine details either represented or painted - in fact I have a whole Ikea wardrobe full of the beasts! (other companies make wardrobes lol). Now that their original purpose is no more - as on the rare occasion when I can do a model show I cannot haul around a whole table's worth of Ju 88 display conversions - I am hoping instead to slowly get them finished. Obviously trying to finish a model after it has been - er...finished....is not ideal but i hope I can do something with the poor things. At a glance my Mistel S3 looked the easiest and quickest to over-haul but I am my own worst enemy and so instead to just ripping the canopy off, finishing the cockpit, and then filling and painting the model etc, I have ended up instead basically rebuilding the entire model! Away went the solid engines and solid fuselage extension; and I thought at the same time I may as well chain drill out the rear bomb bay doors, other hatches and the rear gear bay doors. In has gone my latter edition hollow fuselage extension (followed soon by my hollow engines), AIMS tail wheel set and rear fuel tank set, and finally some work to the cockpit. I await a test shot of my own AIMS rear gear bay set and then they can be fitted out also. So what a mess! I can only do a little bit each day due to my hands but actually the pain from the modelling is nothing compared to the pain using the computer and writing this. Anyway intro over, I hope you like and will enjoy it developing. I will be seeking to model Mistel S3 W.Nr. 460066 which was found without a Fw 190 composite - so that will save some work haha. A Very Happy Christmas to you all.
    32 points
  10. HL-10

    VIGGEN.

    Jetmads 1/32nd scale Viggen. What can I say? An impressive model. Very well engineered and very well presented! Resin is brittle, so careful handling required at all stages. Camouflage, it had to be done in fields and meadows! was achieved with Humbrol enamels and a lot of masking tape! I have always loved this aeroplane and now I have one in 1/32nd scale, well I am very, very happy. Thanks for looking Angelo
    31 points
  11. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    hey everyone Happy New Year! thanks Jay - I have found everything I need in the library - I think the P40 is about 80% identified where the drawing title has been added to aid searching. in fact the biggest problem is seperating out the early & late versions - some components were shared, but for example I did the PE design for a full set of fuselage formers before I realised I had done the late P40 which is completely different! I have been in there for hours and hours and the PE design has now grown to 2 huge sheets after I decided to add the flaps too.. Many thanks Chad, and after our PM conversation, thanks so much for the pics - super helpful ..the first thing to set about was the nose - it's all very well having a solid perspex keel and solid formers, but there is a bit of work to do to open it all out for the chin intake and exhaust area.. I mocked up the PE radiator front so I could orient what needed to be done and set about grinding and cutting out the lower chin area.. ..also the rear where the cowl flaps will go.. ..added two ali plates that will give strength to this bifurcated area.. ..you can also see the ali tube I let into the upper nose for the basis of the (carb?) air intake ..the inside of the cowl is lined with sheets that duct the air from the intake to the 3 round prestone radiators - I have no drawings of this area so all I know is the shape of each intake segment, and the round radiator diameter at the end of it. to form the shapes, I needed to make bucks on which to form the metal sheet intakes. I started by laying out blanks of the shapes at each end and building a simple frame that held them in the right position Once the frame was removed from the model, a pole was added to lock that position and the frame cut away, resulting in these funny shapes.. ..those shapes were then built out with scrap plastic & balsa and filled with P38 filler and ultimately refined into the bucks needed.. intake shapes at the front.. ..radiator shapes at the back.. ..then annealed litho can be formed on the bucks to form the trunking.. ..these were then primed and painted as I won't be able to get to them once fitted.. ..then a bit of jiggling and they are fitted.. ..I slathered a bit of epoxy around them to help them keep their shape.. ..and the process worked - I also added a tape ring where they meet the rads which is like a canvas boot but you can't really see it.. ..the transition is quite smooth.. ..and thats it for now, rear area next.. TTFN Peter
    31 points
  12. The end of the year is approaching, time for my finished models. By the way, I wish you great models in 2022.
    31 points
  13. Thank you guys for your effort and especially to Lester for his incredible research which will enable me to apply the correct name to my model - that's why I love LSP! Thierry, thanks for the hint. The different IP layout is the reason why I printed a new front IP according to a drawing from the NATOPS and I did not forget the boxes on top of the coaming either. I modified the rear IP as well but I think I'll print a new one. The basic Black Box part was not nicely cast which did not help my (rather bad) painting effort. I managed to get a bit of bench time last weekend. I was not quite happy with the look of the FS36320 on the top surfaces; I sprayed several coats of FS36320 from MRP and Gunze and applied a bit or MRP FS35237 on top in order to obtain the shade I was looking for. The model was then sealed with flat varnish from VLS (great stuff!). I then applied a firs warm grey wash and added several shadings with highly diluted Tamiya Smoke. The photos of the real a/c show wome nice stains around the guns. I have tried to replicate the stains with a combination of oil paint and Tamiya Smoke. The typical scuff marks above the elevators were applied by airbrush. Next step: Masking! The masks were cut on my venerable Silhouette Portrait. One of the best moments in scale modelling IMO... Not too bad IMO! Thanks to Lester, I can now draw the artwork for the pilot name. I'd love to paint it on as well - sadly, it's too small for my Portrait to cut. I have contacted Oneman Army to ask if he'd be willing to do custom laser cut masks for me, but I am still waiting for his reply. Stay tuned!
    30 points
  14. It has been a while since I posted a completed build; this past summer and fall were interesting times for me to say the least. I was able to get back to the bench in late November and finished the Lancaster cockpit kit I began working on in May. I did a lot of scratch building on this build adding several electrical and hydraulic lines, as well as making some electronic components. Scratch building is one of my weaker modeling skills so I was pretty satisfied with how the build turned out. The nose section is marked as an 83 Squadron (Pathfinder) aircraft circa the spring of 1943. Ernest The only weathering I did on this build was some very minor scuffing of the paint in a few areas. Most of the scratch building work I did can't be seen well - or at all - but, a few of the lines and pieces of equipment can be seen. I did a build thread on the "In Progress" thread, so if anyone would like to see more of the scratch building it can be seen there. The electrical lines turned out pretty well, and look the part after painting. I added a small red LED light thinking it might make for some neat "mood" pictures.
    30 points
  15. Hello All I thought we could use (yet) another build thread on the Jetmads Viggen - or rather a Finishing thread. I am getting closer to finishing this one and I thought I would share some images of my progress. This will also mark the first time that I show off my work to you guys so I hope you like it. I am planning to post a "Ready For Inspection" when its complete, where I will also share some thoughts on the kit and the entire build process. No pictures from the build process though as I simply didn´t take any.. The main paints used is the full MRP set made for the Viggen. These were applied over a few coats of MR Surfacer 1500 mixed roughly 50/50 with Mr Hobby levelling thinner. Masking is quite a challenge but for the main part I used the masking set from DN Models. (It really didn´t fit well on the main fuselage the way I used them so get your masking tape out! - and take a couple weeks off work) I didn´t really like the way the paints came out (no surprise with this paint method) so the light green was oversprayed/dusted with Gunze H58 Interior green. The Black was dulled down using Tamiya XF-85 Rubber Black. The Dark Green was dusted with MRP-249 SAC Bomber Green - I felt that both green colors really needed some yellow to make them "pop" some more. The tan color was dealt with using a mix of various browns to tie them all together. Everything was then highlighted and shaded with various hues of those colors. /Niels
    30 points
  16. A few drone related antennas on top of the fuselage... ... and we can call her done! A proper RFI thread will follow as soon as I have taken proper pics of the model. Thank you all for following the thread and special thanks to my buddies Fred aka Stusbke for the center canopy and the PE parts and to Thomas for milling the stiffening plates on the fin for me. See you soon!
    30 points
  17. This is 1/32 Hasegawa P-40N Warhawk with the markings of 'Geronimo' 45th Fighter Squadron on Nanumea Airfield, Ellice Islands, Dec 1943. Modifications are; Eduard instrument panel and seat belts Eduard exhausts Paints : Gunze Sangyo and Tamiya acrylics. Customized Nose art is from CustomHobby Decals (www. customhobbydecals.com) Happy Modelling
    29 points
  18. Below is my first attempt at building a model in over 16-17 years. This kite is that of my great-uncle, 2nd Lt Virgil G Ray. Marine pilots in the Solomons did not have assigned planes and I have pictures of Virgil in or around four different Corsairs. However, I have two pictures of Virgil posing around this plane, so I'll assume he flew it at least once. The subject is an F4U-1 Birdcage with the nose art 'Mad Duck' and the number 'White 80'. I believe these pictures to be from Sept 1943 when VMF-214 was flying out of Munda, but I am not 100% positive. Virgil flew three tours with VMF-122, 112 and 214 between May and October 1943, before disappearing on a flight on 13 Oct 1943. More information regarding Virgil can be found at https://missingmarines.com/virgil-g-ray/ or in Bruce Gamble's works on VMF-214. In short, he was an original member of the Blacksheep Squadron, and flew on Boyington's division in Sept 1943 on multiple sorties, including a rather famous dogfight in which Boyington claimed 5 victories. In my research, Virgil was credited with at least one, possibly two, probable 'kills' in June and Sept 1943, although we all know how subjective those claims can be. I'll include some documents and original pictures in the post below. This kit was made as a birthday present for my father, also a former Naval aviator. The kit was built out of the box with the exception of some HGW Wet Transfers and Eduard masks. Paints were mostly Tamiya, with some Model Master and Vallejo. Weathering was Tamiya panel line wash, and Winsor and Newton artists oils for filtering and blending. I also did some chipping with a XF-16. I attempted a bit of a preshading, as well as Doog's Models style 'sandwich shading' when spraying the base colors, to introduce tonal variety into the paint scheme. All in all, I think this turned out decent for my first kit since I was 15-16 years old or so. Certainly some errors you'll find if you look. Also some things I would do differently. All in all this project was a ton of fun, and I've been bitten by the modeling bug again. I've already purchased the Tamiya P-38, P-47, a Trumpeter SBD and Bf109G10 on deck. I eventually plan to do another 1/32 Birdcage that Virgil flew, in the earlier two tone scheme and some cool squadron art of VMF-122.
    29 points
  19. Here are my completed builds for 2021: cheers P
    29 points
  20. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    evening all Haha, thanks Adam - I remember that too - chemical heat reaction of two part foam inflating my tigercat won't do that again Thanks Pat - always good to have an experienced wingman I might try the heavier stuff next time as this foam is while stiff, quite lightweight That's a good spot KUROK and please do keep me staight on this build as I don't know the aircraft well at all. I did profile the floor to the aerofoil so thats fine, and I had marked out the dihedral & started to make a base floor with it but them remembered all the floor parts and the central rib are all being made up in PE.. ..there are about 15 parts to the floor & rib and because it is not in two halves or shaped to be both curved back to front, and also accept the dihedral, I will just keep the aerofoil shape and leave the dihedral - it will be imperceptible in the end hopefully.. so, onto the fuselage - I did some experiments with Z-Poxy resin both with and without tights.. ..the findings were mixed - just adding a layer to the foam gave a bit of a skin (on the right), but I could still easily deform it with a fingernail... with the tights, the surface was way stronger but very textured so would need a lot of work, or perhaps more coats.. In the end, I decided to stick with plan A and skim the foam and fuselage with P38 filler..the skin is very thin and ultimately still quite fragile, but with a mix of CA and filler it's good enough to form and rivet litho over.. ..it took a bit of work, and where I sanded through the filler to the foam, I just washed it in thin CA and skimmed over it again.. ..then I added a cotton datum and chopped out big holes to add boxes for the exhaust areas - these wil ultimately be 3D printed so all I need is the 'hollow' that goes behind the skin panel.. ..then the fuselage was refined, the lower cowl vacformed (& here only taped on) and the body shot in high build automotive primer.. ..the lower nose under the spinner has been left as it's a complex scalloped shape ..still lots to do, but the base form is starting to take shape.. TTFN Peter
    28 points
  21. Hello friends And here are my LS planes for this year: Mig-29 A izd. 9.12 : Mig-21 BIS : Mig-21 UM: Mig-21 MF-R: AS 565 MBe Panther : And two non LSP birds, but still big machines: Ju-52 at 48 scale: B-2 Spirit of Alaska at 72 scale: Well, those were for that year up-coming a lot of LSP interesting projects like AS 532 Cougar, Mig-23 UB and Su-33, all at 32-nd scale So thank you as always for stopping by, Cheers and Happy New 2022 Year
    28 points
  22. Some photo's of the underside, the cockpit, and Luigi's helmet...
    28 points
  23. F-4 "N" Phantom II Tamiya 1:32. I make models straight out of the box but here I made a few minor changes for the N version. However, all items still come from other Tamiya F-4 kits + aftermarket decals. Model painted with Hataka Hobby At the begining 1:1 F-4N Phantom II Tamiya 1:32
    28 points
  24. I'm in the mood to finish some of the projects I have started over the last few years. After finishing Scooby, the OA-4M is the next one on my to-do list. It's basically a combination of the old Hasegawa OA-4M and a Trumpeter A-4M following Brenhen's receipe - his brilliant OA-4AR conversion convinced me to try the same. Have a look at his gorgeous build: He was kind enough to post WIP photos of his conversion, which made my life much easier - I just did it the same way he did. In order to spice things up a bit, I decided to add a Black Box cockpit... ... Aires nose avionics bays... ... Aires wheel wells and AMS Resin intakes. The front gear bay required a lot of cutting, puttying and swaring but I was able to make it fit. Not my best cockpit, but it looks quite OK. I'll try to touch it up a little to improve the over all look. The engine was detailed with lead wire and Anyz braided lines as the hell holes on both fuselage side will be open. The Hasegawa electronics hump had to be widened to fit the Trumpeter fuselage. The rear part is from Trumpeter.
    27 points
  25. The Boeing F/A-18E and F/A-18F Super Hornet are twin-engine, carrier-capable, multirole fighter aircraft variants based on the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. The F/A-18E single-seat and F/A-18F tandem-seat variants are larger and more advanced derivatives of the F/A-18C and D Hornet. Let me present to you the 1/32 Revell F-18E hornet, with reed oak figures painted with Hataka paint set.
    27 points
  26. Hello guys, this is my recent build and my first helo kit finished. Simple almost OOB build, with Eduard PE set used mainly for interior and RB productions mini guns Easy assembly and good overall fit of the parts. Painted with MRP paints and finished with MIG and Ammo pigments, shaders and panel line wash. Hope you like it jan
    27 points
  27. johncrow

    One for 2021

    Technically two completions, if you count the new 'Double Detolf' display case. This is the Fisher F9F-8T/TF-9J. It is by far a better kit than I am a modeler, but I had fun building it. Definitely a three, possibly four, footer. I started it while I was on COVID furlough the summer of '20. (That seems like a lifetime ago.) First time trying a couple of things: Orange paint, a giant pain. Also, this was the first time I used masks for some of the markings. The kit decals were somewhat yellowed, and weeks in a sunny window only helped some. When the stencil decals were placed on the white-painted areas, ANYTHING besides perfectly clear film showed. I printed my own decals for the "NAVY" and "ATSUGI" and some of the numbers, but had the same problem. I tried three different clear decal brands, but all could be seen on the white paint. I had all the decals put down when I belatedly decided to try masks. It was a bear removing the decals without wrecking the paintjob I struggled with, so I only did re-did some of the markings. You can see the difference; the "NAVY" is painted, while the "147413" is a decal. The decals actually look better in the photo than real life. Thanks for stopping by, John
    27 points
  28. Hot on the heels of the Dash 8 I'm going to try doing to this what I did to the Bird dog. The box top; and knowing how soft Rodens plastic is and the nose weight I'll probably need, I decided to try making my own main gear spring (brass stock) hopefully a good representation of the main gear, some spare resin wheels from my stash Thanks for looking
    27 points
  29. another model with a fork stuck in it. The upper windows are tinted blue/green but it's not really visible here Ok so the flaps shouldn't be down but when given the option I figured I would use them
    27 points
  30. Stokey Pete

    My 2021.

    As 2022 approaches, and I have my Group build completion submitted, I thought I’d share my completed works for this year. I’ve had quite a productive one compared with previous years, for me anyway. 4 builds across the 4 quarters of the year. Trumpeter Harrier Gr7, not my finest finish, and a bit of a bear to build. A Kitty Hawk Mirage 2000C. A nice enough kit with a few curious engineering choices, but it’s built up nicely enough for my cabinet. Next we go big or go home. Trumpeters epic Flanker. I threw the kitchen sink at this one, including the most ambitious paint job I’ve undertaken. And, I’m rounding of the year with my Shelf of Doom Group Build entry. Tamiya’s F-15E, with a deadly arsenal of JDAMs and AAMs from Reskit and Zactomodels respectively. And that’s my year done. I have a couple of projects for 2022 that will take up my year, and I think that will be it for me, my stash will be empty. I have the Jetmads Viggen, and 6 colourful Vipers to build. After that I have no idea what, or indeed, if I’ll continue to build anything. Best wishes to you all, and here’s to a better year in ‘22.
    27 points
  31. This is the best F-16 kit out there in my humble opinion, I did use a few after-market bits though, Reset exhaust nozzle, the wolf pack jamming pod, the Aires undercarriage, the main tractor is Aero bonus, and the other trucks are verlinden, and my favourite figure are from Reedoak decals are from Afterburner 64th Aggressor Squadron Mission To prepare warfighters to win in air combat against any adversary. Vision Respected, requested, required air combat adversaries. Lines of Effort Know, Teach, Replicate Personnel and Resources The squadron operates 30 F-16C/M aircraft, providing realistic, threat-representative, near-peer adversary air for high-end US and coalition training. History The Aggressor program began in the fall of 1972 with the activation of the 64th Aggressor Squadron. This program started as a direct result of the high air combat loss rate experienced in the Vietnam War. A professional adversary force conducting a program of intense dissimilar air combat training was identified as the best means to remedy this result. This new training replaced pilots flying the same type aircraft in mock combat at their home bases with Aggressor pilots and controllers flying and employing tactics that emulated the former Soviet Union and other potential adversaries. Over the years the Aggressor Squadrons have flown the T-38, F-5, F-15C, and currently F-16 aircraft. As a result of defense budget cuts, the last Aggressor squadron was deactivated in October 1990 and reformed as the Adversary Tactics Division under the 414th Combat Training Squadron, or Red Flag. After twelve years as the professional adversaries for Red Flag, demands began to exceed the reduced Aggressor charter. The 64th Aggressor Squadron was reactivated on Oct. 3, 2003. The principal testament to the value of the Aggressor program is the consistent dominance of our Air Force during recent conflicts.
    26 points
  32. mc65

    1/35 Miniart Caterpillar

    hi all, having in mind to build a Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher to complete my seaplane trilogy, I was folgorated by this picture, and decided to try to reproduce it. so, waiting for the right mojo to start with the plane, I built the Cat. I decided that the 3 points in scale difference can be ignored due to the distance between the two subjects and the perspective that will work for me (I hope). the Miniart kit it's a 642 parts beauty, something that can drive crazy an impacient modeler. fortunately I'm just the opposite, a sort of zen sloth, so it was sufficient to follow the instructions step by step and carry on to obtain a nice solid base to play with paints. the kit it's fairly completed, I added the Eduard PE fret, but actually it wasn't necessary. I added to the kit just fuel lines, frontlamp guards and the glass air filter. to paint it easily, I kept it separated in main subassemblies til the end. with some extra attention it's possible to adjust the track tensionator, obtaining more or less sag on these, at like. I used lifecolors acrylics for the main painting, rely on oils for the weathering. the sole item missing for my purpose was a decent driver, so I made my little Frankenstein's monster assembling one from parts coming from several origins. after some trial and error, I arrived here. it-could-work! and since painting figures is my black beast, I forced myself to complete it during the building of the tractor. the three carters on the track tensionator are not glued yet, i have not yet decided wich is the best setting for these. also, the low part of the Cat deserves some more weathering with sand dust, but I'll wait until it will join its base, before attempting to do this step. I added a couple of Italeri jerrycans and a padlock, and i think I'll add some other little details, like rags, at the final disposal of it. either the track links will need to be combed, and again I'll wait the final stage of the diorama building to do that. all in all a fun building, if you're looking for something different, that's a really nice choice. cheers, Paolo
    25 points
  33. Hello When it was released some years ago, the Tamyia Spitfire was my first LSP. After sometime I started to question some of the choices I made, especially leaving the engine visible. As I was not happy, I decided to redo the built, unfortunatly for some reasons (probably my lack of skills at that time) I couldn't fit the engine cowls.. So guess what, I started other with another one (meanwhile, an other idea took shape in my mind.... i'll see in another thread.. Not much to say about this one, everything was already said about this magnificent kit. I used the Renaissance decals dedicated to the Free French Spitfire to depict the aircraft used by Cdt René Mouchotte. It is probably aboard this particular aircraft that he disappeared.
    25 points
  34. Hello In my previous thread, I presented my new Mk IX => https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/92040-spitfire-mk-ix-tamyia-132/ As I said, I had some idea to recycle the old Mk IX.... I found out that the AA Production conversion kit for a Mk XIV could be adapted on the Tamyia Model... Well... this needed some surgery but it ended up being a Mk XIV. First, I removed some stuff : the engine (obviously...), the rudder and the elevators. I also removed some of the canopy and the landing gears to protect them. (The windshield was reluctant to go, so I left it to not break it...) Next step, unpacking the chainsaw.... to remove the VTP and the tips of the HTP Then we can install the new vertical tail plane (it is much bigger on the griffon engined Spits to compensate the enormous torque of the beast). Removal of both radiators to instal the bigger ones... I also installed the new tailwhell compartement... then the big part : the nose... that was not easy and I gave it a lot of thinking before doing anything... in the end I decided to use the old Mk IX engine cowls to join the fuselage with the new front resin part. Some (a lot) putty and sanding later... Then I engrave the panel lines on the nose, applied a layer of surfaced and removed the old decals ont the rest of the A/C Then painting and decaling... i used leftover decals so I had a very limited choice in letters and numbers of the S/N. This A/C probably never existed. On top of that I wrongly installed the letters in the right side.... anyway, here is the beast
    25 points
  35. Jennings Heilig

    Meet Freckles!

    Thanks to @Uncarinafor rescuing this adorable girl from certain death on the side of the road. She got to meet and spend the afternoon with my two boys, and it turned out pretty well. She’ll come home to stay with us later this week. So far so good! I needed a third dog like another hole in my head, but they tend to find you when the time is right.
    25 points
  36. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    afternoon all Thanks Antonio - well this installment should have the answers Thanks Kurok and yes, I am so glad I spotted it, and even more glad it was early enough to rip it out and start again. I trust Jumpei's drawings implicitly and have always used them, but no matter how God like the artist, I must learn to check with photo's! Indeed Pat - thanks for the tips - I would never have thought of vacforming onto it, so thats a real bonus In fact, that is where I started trying out this new material - there is a keel assembly that is underneath the P40 made of 3 or 4 sections, so I got the drawings and scaled a floor and three cross sections. From here I filled the blanks with foam and sanded it down. I found a saw works best for main cuts, then a rasp for major shaping and then a sanding stick for finessing. One thing is it makes a lot of gritty dust which gets everywhere - it is hard stuff a bit like the stuff flower arrangers use I used quite thick card in my dental vacformer to pull a couple of copies of keel parts - found they make for a great way to knock up moulds for these sorts of parts which previously I would have spent longer using P38 filler. It sands really easily and stuff like this can be made in minutes.. ..In thinking about using it on the airframe itself - I wanted to be happy I could skin metal onto it so made up a test piece of foam with compound curves ..the first try just using it raw failed - the contact adhesive largely absorbed into the foam and the surface area of all the structure between what are essentially foam bubbles is not enough to get any adhesion I tried a skin of P38 filler & primer like I would anyway and this fixed the adhesion - but care is needed in forming the sheets as its quite easy to scar the foam even with hard wood coffee stirrers when i riveted the skin once its in place (which has to be done for compound curved areas), the distortion of the metal is more pronounced and there is a danger of going straight through it and puncturing the skin a tried a wash with thin CA and that helped a little with rigidity so I am sure with a combo of filler and CA I can make it work.. with the test done it was time to start doing the airframe.. the pro's in being able to get a 'body' in a couple of hours vs being careful with skinning is too strong - as opposed to days of trying to plank or fill all the areas with balsa & P38.. ..soon the airframe was done and the basic shaping complete - I will probably vacform the chin area and the area under the spinner will be P38 as there is a lot of scalloping and compound curves.. ..the keel parts sit here.. ..so now I need to give it a skim of P38 and do A LOT of refinement before its in a fit state to be skinned in metal later.. TTFN Peter
    25 points
  37. Thanks once again all! Its nice to have somewhere to 'vent" as the term goes...............and I sometimes feel this build needs a LOT of venting! Possibly............ I only say possibly, as I don't want to get too ahead of myself with SO much left to do before actual paint goes down. There have been so many rounds of priming, filling and sanding that there is a significant portion of the model that will need to be completely re-scribed, which I am NOT looking forward to, but its something that must be done before paint can even be thought of. I had to jump around again a bit to keep my sanity, as these final rounds of sanding and filling have got me down a bit, even though it has made the surface of the model much better. Back to the gear...........this time its the nose gear not the MLG. I've been thinking a lot about stance and how I do NOT want the dreaded "California lift" that the T-Cat gets a lot when not fueled up, or lightly loaded with a very nose high attitude. My goal with the stance of the model is for neutral level or maybe just a slight tail down attitude as that is norm for the aircraft, but I just hate the drastic nose high look. With this in mind I made the nose gear oleo strut about as short as I'm comfy with on a flying example, and lengthened the MLG oleo struts to as long as as I've seen on a flying example, all to try to counteract the heavy nose up attitude. I have also found 1 more thing that may help as I was delving over the nose gear and nose wheel recently. The nose wheel example is from our own Harold, and is quite nice, being about the same diameter as the OOB HpH example, just with better tread. The difference between the two is that the OOB nose wheel is in two parts with the hub being separate and Harold's example being all 1 piece except for 1 half of the rim. There is also a 2nd nose wheel that was used on the F7F and it normally has the disk cover over it, and has a smaller overall diameter than the larger normally uncovered nose wheel. You can see an example of the smaller covered nose wheel on an actual picture of 80405 here: There is also a couple different versions for the paint scheme of 80405 as well. Here is pic of 80405 from a slightly later time frame (still at El Toro) where they have either painted the A-99 on the bottom port wing or it is prior to the above pic and they removed it for some reason. I would probably guess the former. As the cover on the nose wheel is just bolted onto what is essentially a non-covered nose wheel, I got an Idea to gain a couple scale inches in the nose. Since Harold was gracious enough to send me an extra version of the smaller covered wheel I decided to try to hack it up and see if I could get the OOB HpH wheel to eventually fit inside it, and make a smaller un-covered nose wheel since no one can prove 80405 never had an uncovered nose wheel. If I'm being honest, for as nice as Harold's nose wheel is, the OOB HpH wheel is slightly more crisp in molding, but it remained to be seen if I could make it fit. Since I already had a nose wheel I planned on using, albeit a bit large, I decided to take a stab at it, since if I ruined it, I would loose nothing. I used consecutively larger drill bits until I got to 1/4", then I broke out my stepped hand reamer and bore it out the rest of the way VERY slowly. In the end while not perfect I got there, and it turned out very decent indeed and is in fact closer to the diameter of the nose wheel pics I have. You can see the difference between Harold's un-covered nose wheel/tire VS his smaller nose tire with the HpH wheel inserted. Quite a difference I used a bit of Mr Surfacer 1500 black to smooth out the transition a bit prior to primer: I got round 2 of primer down, and that included the main wheels/tires as well as both the larger and smaller finished nose wheel/tire combos. While not perfect the newly created smaller nose wheel seems a bit more crisp looking on both the tire and wheel, and after some finish sanding should be just fine. Its a little hard to see, but I also completely stripped the paint and primer off of the turning brass nose wheel I made a few years ago, and revamped it to have the axle area be a bit more accurate. Nose gear V2.0 All for now as I'm headed back down to see if I can finalize the finish today, which means I can start the re-scribe soon. Cheers!
    25 points
  38. As I explained in another thread on this subject on this forum, this is a brand-new tool commissioned by Revell for Revell. This is one of those cases where you must take my word for it. Revell has been commissioning new models for the last couple of years. Radu
    25 points
  39. Hello Gentlemen, I just wanted to say a Thank you to those who look after the LSP Forum's electronics working and keeping the forums updated. To the engineers (most likely it's Kevin) for its smooth running. To the Administration staff... K2 with the annual Christmas Raffle that probably has him running ragged so thanks K2. I also would like to say a personal thank you to those who contacted ME when MY Mom passed away. And recently MY Cousin. Very grateful for your kindness and mindful thoughtful wisdom. Your words of wisdom and strength got ME through the sad times. and finally To all of you on LSP forum, Non LSP Forum, vendors contributors et al A HUGE THANK YOU for all that you do to make this forum one of the best. I appreciate that too. And thank you to those Learned men of LSP .... I learnt a few things.. with giggles, laughs and merriment along the way !! So please have a safe, Happy Christmas that is Peaceful and joyous. Remember it is not all about getting presents but thinking of others too. { but enjoy your large WINGY THINGY too !}. MERRY CHRISTMAS & a HAPPY NEW YEAR that is full of laughter. MARU 5137. { }
    25 points
  40. Dec 24/21 One last update before Santa arrives! This step of adding the exhausts (Steps 172- 186) looks fairly simple, but it’s actually very hard. As with the intake pipes, the exhausts are absolutely full of big seam lines and along tightly curved surfaces, fairly hard to remove cleanly. There’s also a few big gaps when exhaust parts are glued together, but with lots of sanding and CA glue, you can get them looking fairly smooth. Here they are after a coat of Alclad Steel and a hint of Alclad Copper, along with the big engine frame, Part J22, that is painted interior green after all the pin marks were removed. Then installed, with not much to see from the front. But a lot going on at the back, which is crowded enough already, but with spark plug wires, the installation is very tricky, so you need to take your time and go slowly, triple checking the instructions so that you don’t make any gluing errors. Thankfully no two exhausts are even close to the same shape, so it’s probably hard to make a big mistake unless you force something. The exhaust tips were drilled out before painting, but I found that they didn’t fit the pipes very well without leaving big gaps, so I used liberal amounts of CA glue and repainted them. This angle shows why placing spark plugs on the back of the front cylinder bank is useless, because you can’t see any of it with all this spaghetti hanging out the back. In order to not touch the engine more than I have to, some of the paint on the spinner and rear has eroded off as I handled it instead, which I will repair later when I’m not grabbing the engine any more. Bottom view With the wiring and piping finally done, I’ll be adding several parts to the back of the engine which sadly, will hide most of the rear of the engine and much of the extra work to make it look good. Oh well, at least I’ll know it’s there. Cheers and Merry Christmas to everyone, Chuck
    25 points
  41. Took a short break before the final painting and assembly. Now it remains to assemble the front part and dock with the back.
    25 points
  42. I've been quietly beavering away at this kit the HK Do335. Needs no introdution other than to say I found a set of probably what if markings on t'internet and decided to adopt them in lieu of the standard splinter scheme. The kit goes together really well with the exception of the rear fuselage which sits a little proud for some reason. Anyhow, it was manipulated into position and secured. I left the front and the starboard rear cowlings removable adding micro magnets to help holding them in place. The whole thing was weathered minimally as being a "factory fresh" aircraft i figured it wouldnt have been too beaten up other than test flights. The pilot figure came with the kit and fits beautifully. On with the show.
    24 points
  43. Here is a project designed to scratch an itch composed of a few parts: 1) my fascination with spaceflight, 2) a box of random parts seeking a home, and 3) fun with miniature lighting effects. The result is the Deep Space Ship Chesley Bonestell, an interplanetary spacecraft one could imagine being built and operated many centuries from now. I'm not an engineer, but I've worked in the industry for many years and can play among engineers for a few hours before it becomes clear I am an imposter. This thing would carry a few hundred people to destinations within the solar system. It is powered by a nuclear engine, perhaps an inertial confinement fusion drive system. Tanks and so forth are located in the propulsion module, which is shielded from the forward and middle sections. The middle stretch is composed of microgravity labs and storage, possibly probes. The habitation module spins, something on the order of 1 RPM to generate just under 1g along the circumference. A dome of thick material shields the section from oncoming debris and radiation. I imagine the forward section having the capability to separate and move on its own in an emergency, so there are tanks and engines inside there, despite being difficult to see. The model is composed of an old gundam kit I picked up for parts, an aspirin bottle, wheels from the crewed rover seen in the movie "Moon", parts of the 1/72 Saturn V kit, a nifty kit from China of the space station in "Wandering Earth," some antenna bits from Tamiya's 1/350 CVN-65 Enterprise, ping pong balls, and parts from a 1/72 Discovery kit (as in 2001: A Space Odyssey). The lights are from Evan Designs - excellent products and service, and I highly recommend that business for your lighting needs.
    24 points
  44. About ten years ago, I built Atomic City’s 1/12 Mercury kit. I am thankful that a model kit of this historic subject in this scale is available. Other kits, some of which were produced in the 1960s and 1970s, are in smaller scales and are of relatively poor quality. The Mercury capsule is a small vehicle, essentially a spacecraft built around a man. As such, it lends itself well to being represented in kit form at a larger scale, and 1/12 is ideal. In terms of a review, the MRC/Atomic City kit is generally well produced. The outer hull, with the exception of the hatch, is molded in black, while most of the interior parts are molded in light gray. The instrument panel parts are cast in a hard clear plastic, which is a nice touch for those interested in back-lighting the dial faces and switches. The escape tower parts are molded in red. An astronaut figure is included, cast in vinyl, and is of excellent quality. A major drawback is the model’s lack of interior detail. It lacks, for instance, the forward bulkhead with hatch, helium tanks, tape recorder, interior hull details, and other parts. The interior arrangement that is provided is generic; it would have to be for simplicity sake in that each Mercury had a different capsule arrangement. Still, it is a marvelous kit to work from. In the end, however, I ended up only using a few kit parts: the outer hull, the forward recovery compartment hull piece, the backshell piece, parts of the seat, and a section of the kit’s aft bulkhead part. The rest of the model is scratch-built. For my collection, I built a representation of John Glenn’s Friendship 7 as it appeared shortly after reentry. I selected this subject because of its historical significance, and chose a post-flight configuration because of the opportunity to explore weathering and distressing techniques. Also, Glenn peppered the interior with all sorts of notes taped to the instrument panel and made various marks applied with a pen - I thought these would be fun aspects to reproduce. Oddly, there is not much data on Friendship 7 readily available online. But the most important resource (beyond the actual vehicle, located at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC) is the NASA Project Mercury Familiarization Manual (NASA SEDR 104), November 1961. This document is similar in some ways to the kind of manual you might find for a car in that it contains many drawings of individual components and their placement, plumbing and wiring diagrams, and various other interesting elements that are invaluable to a modeler wishing to build a Friendship 7 model. Essentially, this was the only resource I used, occasionally supplemented by photos found online. I did not live in the Washington, DC area at the time. If I did, I would have visited the actual artifact and taken copious notes. As it happened, I got a few things wrong; for example, I did not build the correct version of the seat used for Glenn’s flight (I screwed that up royally, discovering this problem after the build was long complete). But no worries, as was quite happy with the result and enjoyed the journey!
    24 points
  45. dani7705

    1/32 Avia B.534 HpH

    Here is a few pictures of the freshly completed construction of the resin model..The construction was more demanding than usual for kits of this type...I supplemented the model with the main wheels,tail wheel and Pantoff bomb racks in the form of design my own 3D models then printed on a 3D printer...The model and all markings on it are sprayed through their own masks with Tamyia acrylic paints...Their shades are mixed from the basic shades from Tamiya acrylic paints...Sidolux ( acrylic varnish for wooden floors ) is used as the final varnish, I adapted its gloss using a matt base from Tamiya...I would like to Thank the manufacturer for the prompt response to the replacement cracked middle part of the cockpit cover - THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
    24 points
  46. this is the most sublime timing going... I have just mastered a set for the Harrier that I started years ago, the decals are being printed and I have a test shot PE Should be ready at the end of Feb Only thing is I have lost the kit part I mastered from so I need a kit panel to make sure the test shot works - if anyone has one they can lend me for a couple of weeks they get a free set or two Just PM me if interested - first come first served Peter
    24 points
  47. Hello and Happy New Year! I've spent last week adding a clear gloss cote, doing panel wash and applying decals... than again a clear gloss cote and finally a flat cote. Here the result. Decals come from various decal sheets. Now it's time to add some weathering effects especially around the rear nozzles and the rear fuselage. CIAO! Piero
    24 points
  48. With the high school football season over, I've managed to finish her off! Here she is, Ding Hao, flown by Medal of Honor winner James Howard. She isnt perfect but I'm happy with her. Incidentally, the Monogram 1/48 version of this was my first serious attempt at making a more accurate scale model, all the way back in 1970. So glad to have revisited the subject! And a final shot, along with comparison shots of my RCAF P-51 Mk Ia, and my early P-51D. Been on a Mustang tear lately. Have a P-51D late in the works... But first, working on a FLY Hurricane Mk I and an RC 1/6 IDF Super Sherman conversion. Cheers, everyone I hope you have a Very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Dave/Ironman1945
    24 points
×
×
  • Create New...