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  1. spook

    Azur Dewoitine D-520

    Hi all Here my last built, the Azur D-520. Not an easy kit! May be the more difficult of the 1940 french fighter serie Hope you like it!
    35 points
  2. Wessex HU.5 FLY Models 1:32 This time, one of my favorite helicopters. Its appearance is controversial, but I've always liked it. As for the paint job, as far as I know, it was only painted like this after it was scrapped.
    34 points
  3. Hello to all guys. A new completed project is a fairly difficult model and requires experience. I also added wire and tubes for the weapons, train shafts and resin wheels. The plane is riveted and the National emblems painted. Canton island airport - 46th FS - Gilbert islands summer 1943. Thank you for watching
    34 points
  4. Hi friends this is well known HpH resin model of L-39 at 32nd scale. As you know - very sharp details, nice panels and riveting. You need only Master's pitot tubes and static dischargers for AM. Almost everything else is excellent molded. Of course adding some scratch details always is a nice touch The only weak point that I've noticed are the landing gears - they need some strength with metal rods. Model is paint with home mixed MRP paints, also part of weathering is with MRP paints, and of course acrylic pencils and paints, some oils and filters . So here it is: I hope you will like it As always thank you friends for stopping by, stay safe and cool. Cheers :)
    32 points
  5. Hello all, Although I am the member of this forum since last year, this is my first WIP. Becasue most of the time I build the models in 1:72 and 1:48 scales. But this time I decided to do something different and post my progress here with you. I hope you will enjoy too. Since couple of years I am working on full 3D modeling of entire Oxcart/Blackbird family. This huge project has been mostly done and there a few things to be detailed for SR-71 series. In this project I am planning to model fully 3D printed YF-12A "The Thing" in 1:32 scale. I know this will be very challenging but if I successfully finish this build it will be a unique work!.. Before starting this build here I would like to present my YF-12A model in general and details: The forward chine area has been modeled with all four versions: I will start with the cockpit details and wheels. Printing the huge fuselage parts will be very challenging! Serkan
    30 points
  6. Garcor

    F-100D

    Hello again, I finished this Trumpeter F100 the end of March 24. No aftermarket used. Happy Sticking Gary
    29 points
  7. Hello, everyone This is my Fokker E.V., I built almost a year ago. I forgot to post this. This kit was tough to build. I needed to clean up all the parts and repeat test fitting many times. The most difficult part was assembling the landing gear and wing, but I was fortunate I got a template of jig for assembling the wings and landing gear, which came with a Pheon Decal sheet. Aviattic lozenge decals were used on the fuselage. Aviattic PE are also used. Furthermore, the wheels, horizontal stabilizer, control stick, machine gun, etc. are used from the excess parts of Fokker Dr. I of MENG MODEL. For painting the wing, I used oil paint because the wing of the actual plane seems to be painted with brush so I wanted to replicate this. The building was tough, but I am satisfied with the result. I hope you all enjoy watching it.
    29 points
  8. Thank you for the comments! I'm just creeping along here... I've pulled back some of the cockpit masking so that I could add the scratchbuilt brace and fuel fill nozzle. The whole model was given a flat coat, Model Master Clear Flat Acryl. The sliding canopy was unmasked just to see how bad the crack looks. The crack is small but unavoidably noticeable. The windscreen masking was left in place since I've not done any weathering yet. There should be a decent view into the cockpit with the windscreen masking removed and the pilot door posed open. Pausing again at this stage. Painting is done but weathering has not started.
    29 points
  9. As of my last post, there were two major items left in the cockpit - the rudder pedals and the pilot's seat. So I set to work on them. Model Monkey has a few 3D printed items in 1/18 scale for the P-51, and I took advantage of that and ordered some stuff. This is what I got: Rudder pedals with the NAA emblems, the Warren-McArthur (WM) seat which comes with armor plate, and P-51A/B/C bomb shackles. The bomb shackles will gather dust for an eternity but glad I got them. The rudder pedals - stay tuned. The WM seat - well it's really nice but it is set up for the P-51D model, which has quite different support tubes and its attachment to the armor plate. So, I am going to save it for the time when I do a -D model - a real possibility with so much commonality with the -B. The rudder pedals surprisingly fit into my fuselage with nearly no modification at all. That center post had to be trimmed back to clear the control lock push rod, but that's all. I added some simple details so that I could attach control cables, painted it, and installed it into the fuselage. Voila: From the front: It was no surprise to me at all that with the windshield in place along with the instrument panel and center console, the rudder pedals literally cannot be seen unless with a flashlight and even then only a little. What can be seen are the cables, nearly all the RH cable, and just a bit of the LH cable. Oh well. I know they are there and they are beautiful. The seat. P-51's had two different seats to choose from, and they were interchangeable even though they look quite different from one another. A Warren-McArthur (WM) seat which is a sheet metal ugly looking bucket, and a Schick-Johnson (SJ) seat, I believe made mostly from plywood, and to my eye a more elegant looking item. Sometime in the P-51B run, the WM seat began to replace the SJ on the production line, until by the time the -D model was being produced, it appears that the WM seat only was being supplied. I have some reason to believe my subject had the WM seat. So I was going to have trouble with the Model Monkey seat due to its different support tubes and top mounting brackets. But not to fear - Peter Castle (Airscale) quite a while back gave me a huge data dump from his Lope's Hope P-51C build, and in it he provided a Rhino model of a WM seat that he developed. He did alot of work on it, I can tell. So I took it and messed around with it some and made my own version based on his. A picture of it in Rhino, integrated with my floor panels, the control stick, and the armor plate: It's about 50% Airscale and 50% JayW. Thanks again Peter. You're the greatest. And here is the 3D printed kit: Hairspray method chipping, and springs made from .01 inch diameter silver solder. I am very happy with these parts. Assembled and ready for a back pad and seat belts and shoulder harness: You can see it is a different support arrangement than the Model Monkey parts. Dry fitted into the cockpit: Those pretty springs are hidden. Sad. Shoot - look at the sag in my chain. Gotta fix that. Well I cannot iinstall the seat until I get the seat belts, shoulder harness, and back pad in there. Gonna take a while. God I am ready to be done with this cockpit! So in the meantime, I am modeling up the radiator fairings: Started with the surfaces I created quite a while ago, and began building with help from the drawings. The inner duct contours are challenging, but they are coming along. The exit door too. The hardest one remains - the "twilight zone" fairings where the coolant radiator and oil cooler radiator reside, along with the elaborate ducting that leads into and out of those radiators. In the next few days I hope to have that taken care of. This zone also interfaces with the complicated aft most wing-to-fuselage fillet fairing, adding to the fun. Take care, stay cool all of you in the Northern hemisphere. It's HOT where I am right now!
    29 points
  10. Hi everyone, Long time lurker and first post here. I haven’t modeled an aircraft in nearly 15 years and decided to jump back in with the 1/32 OV-10D from Kittyhawk. Yep, I bit off a lot with this one and it tested every modeling skill I had in my bag. From the terrible parts fit, breaking undercarriage, and poor engineering, I think I was able to build it into a nice looking subject. This was also only the 2nd model I’ve ever done with an airbrush (Badger Patriot). The kit features Caracel decals depicting the aircraft in USMC VMO-1 colors in late 1992. I’ve always loved the low-vis scheme and have never seen it replicated on the interwebz Aftermarket includes Quickboost seats, 3D printed exhausts and pilots, white metal landing gear, resin chocks, RBF tags, FLIR/Disco Jammer anti-reflective coatings, and aluminum pitot tube. Paint is Mission Models Light Ghost Gray with Medium Gray upper surfaces. Like I said, this is my first outing in years, and I’m excited by finishing up my current project (Roden OV-1) and then onto a 1/32 Trumpeter A-6A. Cheers y’all and any feedback would be greatly appreciated Regards, Blake
    28 points
  11. As I work to complete the pastel wash, I've notice a few little things that need repair. One is a crack on the fuselage seam next to the wheel well. Not surprising due to the tight fit but I didn't notice the crack until now. It's quickly repaired with a touch of black CA glue. and repainted. There was also a tiny paint lift next to the painted out fuselage band. It's small enough that I skip the sanding and just shoot a dab of thickish Ocean Gray on it. These repair spots seem lighter because they are flat compared to the gloss of the surrounding areas. They should disapper when the final matte coat is applied. The panel wash is essentially finished. I'll probably spend a day or two inspecting the finish and cleaning up any small messes before moving on to the flat coat. Note that the above described repair was done AFTER this light box session.
    27 points
  12. As much as I’m no fan of the person in question, I also don’t think this is the place to thrash out this ugly topic. Nor do I feel that this person deserves any more of our attention. The facts are readily available for those who wish to know them, so in the interests of preserving the dignity of the forums, I’ll end this thread here. I hope you all understand. Kev
    27 points
  13. I realized that I didn't declare that this was finished. Yes it is finished. More pictures will be posted on RFI section later.
    27 points
  14. Garcor

    Ju87D5 Revell

    Hello again, This is the Revell Rebox of the Hasegawa 1/32 Stuka. No aftermarket products used. Vallejo paints used. I completed the model in the standard scheme with decals on before painting on the white distemper coat. All the best Gary
    26 points
  15. The first fuselage part printing is done. It took 19 hours to finish the forward fuselage. The print plate was resting at maximum z height and the printed part nose was still inside the resin vat when the job was finished (I didn't size the part intentionally to fit it in printer's maximum print volume, pure luck! ). In parallel the little Mars 3 has printed the main wheel bays and some other small parts: The part size was also at the limits of wash and curing stations. I am afraid that printing the rear fuselage parts will be more challenging. Serkan
    26 points
  16. Thanks Matt! Looking forward to incorporating the A-i-P stuff! I use 400# 3M sandpaper to sand down the rivets. You actually want a bit of "bite" to quickly remove the raised plastic rather than slowly grinding it down because that tends to clog up the rivets. More riveting progress on the upper wings and forward fuselage panels.
    26 points
  17. So this is my Tamiya P-51D 'Big beautiful doll' complete. This a very highly recommend kit, if you can get one for a good price...buy it! On this build I used the Red Fox Studio set for the instrument and radio panels, Tamiya LP-11 and XF-62 fir the OD. Most of the markings (including the chequered front) are painted, but I wish I did the insignia...I was lazy here and I'm kicking myself for being as such. I hope you all like it! Feel free to send any critique as well, as we all learn from others critique :-)
    25 points
  18. I have managed to print the rear fuselage halves. It took around 19 hours to finish this job. And again just by pure luck the rear half fit exactly the maximum printing volume. There was no margin in z axis and the bottom end was still in resin vat when the job was finished: As expected they didn't fit into cure station either: Fortunately now it is summer and (sometimes) the sun shines here too. I will leave the parts in the garden for 15 minutes to cure them with natural UV light. Serkan
    25 points
  19. After taking on a couple of non-LSP builds (the Airfix 1/48 Anson and Eduard 1/72 Z-37), it's time to return to the land of Large Scale Planes. I decided that this IAR would be next on my list of semi-obscure aircraft to build, and it even has a connection to my last one. The IAR-80 actually shares its rear fuselage with the PZL P.24, which is of course the upgraded version of the P.11 that I built on here last year. The first step so far has been a big one, and that's riveting the airframe. The Azur kit has nice surface detail, but I thought this would be a great test-bed for riveting. So I grabbed the Element tape and the Galaxy rivet wheels, and got to work. I've so far finished the fuselage from the cockpit back, the upper wings, and the tail surfaces. The lower wing and front of the fuselage are left, and those have some really complex shapes I'll have to figure out. Enough rambling from me, here's the beginning of the project. Hopefully it's a good summer project for me before school returns in August. Matt
    24 points
  20. Well I have a big 3D print parts dump for you all. Took two print batches, one for the big parts at .05 mm thickness, one for the smaller parts at .03 mm thickness: One, the forward radiator housing, and the most troublesome and complex one, has already been bonded to the fuselage. It was a tad narrow for some reason, and I had difficulty fitting it over the two lower longerons. The rest are better. There are 15 different parts that are new there (not counting some duplicates), and I do not think I need to redo any of them. That's a first! Yay! Note also that work has begun on those pesky side windows - they look awful and will get worse before they get better. I think I erred greatly on those transparencies. If memory serves, after sanding and burnishing and polishing were complete, I dipped them in future. It was not a great dip, so after allowing some time to cure, I sprayed clear gloss Tamiya over them. It appears to me that the combination isn't good. The resulting surfaces were (and are still, at least until sanding began) a bit tacky and picked up smudges very easily that cannot be buffed out. I dunno - but I am in the process of sanding off whatever is on them, and starting again. This time no future. Wish me luck - I am nervous about it, especially since these transparencies are the weak link of this whole build so far. Back to the subject - a couple of interesting details follow: Here is one of three fuel vents that are prominent little details of P-51 fuselages. One in real life: And in 1/18 scale 3D printed: Note it lacks the cap you see in the picture above it. That feature was added after my subject was manufactured. A tough little Rhino modeling exercise. Prior to the introduction of the fuselage fuel tank, P-51B/C models had two - one on either side of the lower fuselage under the aft-most wing/fuselage fillet fairing. They were for the two wing fuel tanks. When the fuselage tank was added (presumably either by field mod or on the production line), a third vent was added on the RH side just above the radiator air exit door. Here is the oil tank front face, which is visible if one peers into the intake scoop under the wing: I think that is pretty cool for a part that is unseen unless you look for it. Compare to the real thing: That part just had to be a bullet magnet. And the coolant radiator front and rear faces, also visible if one peers into either the inlet scoop or the outlet door (with flashlight): The radiator - also a bullet magnet and the root cause of most P-51 losses I believe. You will see these details in place painted and weathered next post. But a sneak preview of one of the fuel vents dry fitted: I show here all these parts (the big ones anyway) fitted onto the fuselage (almost entirely dry fitted): I am darned pleased that these parts fit together as well as they do. Not perfect, but more than adequate. Remember - I will skin these surfaces. And also it is here that 3D printing parts made from data off the actual drawings bears its fruit - with a correctly shaped lower fuselage where many other model manufacturers don't get quite right. Last post I mentioned that I needed to address the aft-most wing/fuselage fillet fairing - this beastly thing: So I set out trying to Rhino model this shape, just to get something that served as a surface in which to finish up with some putty or P-38 bondo, and then aluminum skinning. What a frustrating exercise in 3D surface modeling. Turned out it needed to be in two pieces, I felt, the lofts were so complicated: And dry fitted: They will serve, methinks. Finishing them off with some bondo and skinning them will be a big challenge. Not sure when I will attempt that - maybe soon. Those parts must be exactly located if they are to interface properly with the wing flaps with flaps up. So I modeled locating pins and holes. With the addition of all those fairing parts below the longeron, the fuselage will be too deep to fit onto the fuselage jig. So let us bid it farewell - here are all the parts that comprised it: I might use it one last time to final install the engine cowl, but to do that I must cut off the aft half of the jig to make room for those fairings! We'll see - it is going to be quite a while before the engine cowl is permanently installed. That jig was vital to this build - may it rest in peace. Lastly for this post, it has been right at a year since I began this project, by starting the surfaces model in Rhino, using the point data on various NAA ordinate drawings. I have added much to it since, and use it still. This picture then shows what I have to offer for a year's worth of effort: What an adventure it has been. Year 2 is going to involve the wing, and hopefully also the aft fuselage and tail. The wing is on my radar now, and I am thinking over build concepts. It will be every bit as adventurous as what has already been experienced. First though, I have more work to do with these new parts, and something tells me now might be the time to skin the rest of this fuselage.... Stick around!
    24 points
  21. I’m not even a fan of the F-35 aesthetics, but after seeing and reading what the Tamiya 1/48 F-35 kit has to offer I wanted to give it a go. I finally finished, and the kit is an absolute mojo restorer, (even if my mojo is already doing fine). I used the SMS paint for the elusive FS36170 color and for the raised RAM tape I painted Quickshine floor polish (not that it really shows up here). For the lighter grey FS36375 I used MRP. They make an FS36170 color as well and while I went with SMS I believe the MRP version is at least as good. I used a mix of Furball and Caracal decals, Galaxy masks, and Eduard wheels. All masking done by hand. Cheers, Tom
    24 points
  22. well, i produced another three-foot model, sigh i shoud have used the italeri kit in hindsight
    24 points
  23. Thanks guys! I hope you guys aren't numb with the repetition of me doing things over again. Let's see if we can actually move this build forward a step or two... Time to paint the fuselage markings. Instead doing each element individually, I'm using a single mask on the port side containing the codes, roundel and serial number so that I get the relative spacing and orientation correct. I'm going to start with the black serial number. The serial number on the starboard side is painted separately due to the overlap with the code letters. I'll place the mask holding the codes and roundel after the black paint dries. Roundels are next... white and yellow are sprayed first. And then the blue and finally the red. After the roundels are done, the code letters are painted in Sky (Mr Hobby Aqueous H-74). The masks are CAREFULLY removed... Very happy to report that NO paint lift occurred. Not even a little one. I'll buff the few rough paint edges out tomorrow after the paint is fully cured. And there may be a tiny paint bleed on the port roundel but otherwise, the markings look good to go!
    24 points
  24. Thanks Dennis! Tell me about it. I've had lots of documented issues with paint lift and it can really be a build-killer, if it is bad enough. Hopefully, that tail section was an isolated incident and VERY CAREFUL mask removal will reveal no further problems. Perhaps Wayne. Definitely a possibility. The good thing is that I did apply Windex on the model directly nor did I leave it on wet. I lightly dampened a small portion of my rag and wiped the model surfaces, making sure to dry off the Windex with other portions of the rag. Hopefully, I removed enough of it, if that is indeed the issue. Thanks Richard! Hopefully, no further mishaps but frankly I am nervous as the fuselage will require extensive masking for the roundels, codes and serials. Woke up early to test the putty snake method to lay down the Dark Green portion of the camo. The putty is rolled into long thin strips and then stuck onto the model in the desired camo pattern. A nice feature of this technique versus pre-cut masks is that you can freely adjust the demarcation line as you apply it on the model. Much easier to get the pattern you want with this method. Instead of a wide spray approach, I used a narrow spray and covered small areas at a time, essentially airbrushing freehand using the putty as a guide. This careful approach reduces the amount of masking that you have to do if you trust your spray pattern. Another convenient feature of this approach is that you don't have to do all of the camo at one time. You can do sections at a time. Much more manageable and I don't have to cramp my fingers rolling miles of putty snakes. Once the pattern is filled in with the Dark Green, which is Mr Hobby Aqueous RAF Dark Green (H-73), the putty can be removed to reveal the completed camo pattern. A small section of the tail is also painted. I like this method better than paper masks. Lots of advantages and result looks pretty good in my eyes. I'll leave this for awhile as I'm off on my normal Sunday routine. I'll inspect it closer and make adjustments as necessary but I may not soften all of the edges as I had previously planned. We'll see.
    24 points
  25. hi gents We have had the pleasure of seeing some interesting P-47s for a while here at the 1/32 scale, as well as at the smaller scale, so I decided to make my small contribution... First, I wanted to build a razorback , but a NM finished one. I wanted something new, or at least rarely seen, and finally, I found this one, sober, however eye catching..... There is nothing special to say about the Trumpy kit. A beautiful kit, but unnecessarily complicated (I mean too muchthings to fit in the fuselage ...for what?) I kicked it all away, and kept the essential parts....This P 47 was particular, it was the only P 47 in NM finish on this unit.... In fact, this aircraft was initially olive drab, like all P 47, but for an unknown reason (unknown to me, if you have more info ...) the olive paint was stripped away, that's made her so particular......Now guys ...... enjoy ......or not Alain the real one ( thank you Dennis )
    24 points
  26. Thanks Jay! It's getting close to the painting stage! One more weathering step on the prop assembly. I like to use salt crystals as a random mask to put some discrete staining on external surfaces. It creates a bit of visual complexity that helps to make small things look a little bigger. Water is spread over the surface and salt crystals are randomly sprinkled on the wet surface. As the water dries, the salt crystals temporarily fuse onto the surface. A very dilute spray of lighter color (I like tans and grays) is sprayed. Once the salt is removed, the resultant pattern should look similar to rain stains. It can be difficult to gauge the effect as you spray but a subtle effect is desired. If necessary, the staining can be dialed back by carefully micromeshing specific areas. After a couple of iterations of adding and subtracting, here's what the prop blades look like at the end of the salt weathering process. The effect varies with the viewing angle and these photos represent the max effect. Once on the model, the prop and spinner staining isn't (hopefully) too noticeable but enough to give a nice impression of wear. The joints between the chin intake and wing/fuselage have been cleaned up. The Master brass gun barrels and shrouds have been painted.
    24 points
  27. Thanks for your appreciative comments my friends. Not a great deal of actual build left now; inner u/c doors, flaps, nav lights then RPs: Weathering will take a while but that will be after I come back from my holiday.
    22 points
  28. Thank you Dennis and Jay! The top camo has been painted so I can now remove the masking on the fuselage and bottom of the stabs. Nervous time. The stabs turned out ok... just one wee paint lift on the port trim tab. And prior to painting, one of the tail doors snapped off. I'll deal with this later since I'm sure it'll keep breaking if I repair it now. The rest of the tape removal went as well as I could have hoped. Only two tiny paint lifts on the leading edge, one on each side. All of these paint lifts were Micromeshed and repaired. Tape removal success warranted a little celebration so I mounted the cannons and prop and posed the freshly painted model in the light box...
    22 points
  29. Thanks Matt! I used Scotch Brite scouring pads that I bought from the grocery store. Honestly, it was a big pain in the butt to try and trim them for this use. You have to thin them which is a very unnatural cutting motion. Tedious and messy and it only netted me a few small pieces, which I've been using over and over. Thanks Kevin! Not too hard actually. I don't worry about overspray if I'm painting this type of pattern without any masks so it's a similar situation but I have the advantage of having a "backstop" for my spray. But it does require a thinner than normal paint mix. Most of my touch-ups involve areas where I had not built up the green to a sufficient opacity, which results from the thin paint mix and not being 100% thorough. Thanks Paul! Appreciate the comments! Continuing on with applying the Dark Green to the upper surfaces. The starboard wing was masked off. And the green was carefully sprayed. Moving on to the front fuselage... After that, I took a break from the putty snakes and did some OCD corrections on the bottom wing roundels. There was a little bit of red bleed into the white on the port wing. I saved the masks just for corrections so the appropriate masks were applied to isolate the white. Tiny shots of white from the airbrush is all that is needed. The important thing for this type of spot repair (and also the camo painting using the putty snakes) is reduce your spray pattern and now where that spray is going to land on the model. My Iwata doesn't shoot dead straight so I have practice my aim continuously. I guess you could do this repair this with a brush but using the airbrush leaves no brush marks. Similar work was done to the starboard roundel with some addtional blue bleeding into the yellow. Not much difference, I know, but I'm happier.
    22 points
  30. Work continues on the IAR. Azur took an interesting design choice with the cockpit, in that it's provided in almost a flat pack format. First order of business was to clean up the flash and mold lines on the parts, of which there definitely is some. Everything was initially primed in black, then the sidewalls were hit with MRP RLM 76. It was lightened and darkened a bit for definition, but it's not an easy color to enliven in a cockpit. Quick brown wash over it, and then a flat coat to seal things up. The flare port was drilled out, and the initial details were added on. Not sure what color the oxygen bottle should be, don't see any notes in my book about it. It needs an oxygen hose added, and a few more detail parts on the starboard side. The kit instrument panel decals have been used so far, and they are nice. They settled over the surface detail quite well with some Microsol and Solvaset. Some small slicing had to be done on the far right panel because the IAR-80 didn't have the bomb release panel that the decal shows. It was replaced with an Airscale gauge to fill the spot. The heelboards and seat were hit with a coat of Alclad Dark Aluminum, then hairspray chipped with the base RLM 76. It showed up much better on the seats than the floor, so some Vallejo Steel was sponged on the heelboards to pop them out a bit more. The seat is made up of 8 parts so far, with a few more to go. Everything goes together well, but the instructions aren't the most clear in this section. Hope to be back soon with more. Please let me know what you think. Matt
    21 points
  31. In both cockpit tubs I have identified some flaws in printing as well as errors in model. They have been fixed and re-printed. Also the gauges were too shallow to paint them properly. Therefore I have slightly increased their depth. Last but not least, The engine rotor fan and inlet guide vanes as well as afterburner rings were printed. Next step is to start printing bigger parts. Serkan
    21 points
  32. Great discussion on the seat assembly! Morrow Aircraft Corporation - I am the smarter for it. Thanks Ralph! Nice to know. But this bird gets the WM seat. So I am in this world right now where one thing leads to another which leads to another. I am in the midst of developing the Rhino models for the radiator intake and exhaust areas below the lower longeron, as reported last update: In order to fully integrate this area so that I can commence with 3D print part making, I have to consider the wing/fuselage fillet fairings, which up until now I have not created surfaces for. So I have been busy doing just that. But, in order to create those surfaces, especially the underside of the aft-most fairing - this one... ..... I must do at least some deveopment of the inboard end of the flap. And to do that, I must try to decipher a flap assembly drawing 73-18001 which is a most hard to read drawing: I am certain that the planners and tooling and fab folks in the NAA factory had to collar the engineers on multiple occasions to help them read that awful drawing. So that they could fab up that first set of flaps back in '42 or whenever. Anyway the inboard end of the flap is kind of complicated, and the underside of the wing/fuselage fairing has to match it. Airscale - if you are reading this, you know this well. At least I have the basic wing surfaces, created back when i started this project a year ago or so. So one things leads to another and another. And it is taking time. Wing/fuselage fairing lines and surfaces are in progress: The aft end is tough. Very tough. Further forward, easy. And the various fairing assemblies in the radiator area are in progress as well: Four fairings, and two hinged exhaust doors. The Mustang enthusiast will recognise the parts instantly. The most difficult development is this one: The real part looks like this (thanks again for the photos Peter C): It isn't finished yet, but close. It includes a large portion of the the coolant radiator intake duct, the oil cooler intake duct, a couple of fuel vents on the skin, a mounting interface for the wing/fuselage fairing. Also I mean to give it two thin flat plates with perforation designs meant to simulate the oil cooler radiator and the coolant radiator, which can be seen if one peers into the sexy intake scoop under the wing. All right then. The struggles continue. Next post I hope to show you some parts. Take care all.
    21 points
  33. Thanks for your encouraging comments @Dandiego, @alaninaustria, @blackbetty. This project will be very teachy for me. I have significant experience 3d printing in 1:72 and 1:48 scales. But 1:32 scale is a totally different class!.. Many thanks @Landrotten Highlander. I can share some photos of printed and assembled parts of Oxcart and "The Thing" in 1:72 to give you an idea how the print quality is: And here are are some photos of 1:48 Oxcart parts: Serkan
    21 points
  34. CruZz

    KopeckyScaleModels

    Its time for some news. F-16 (Tamiya) and A-4 (Trumpeter) airbrakes. Designed for 1/32 kits. But 48 scale is probably also in development.
    21 points
  35. Hi everyone. Here is my latest finished project - AEG.G.IV Early version from WnW. The model is great, as any other WnW kits. I had a lot of fun during the building process. The build was almost OOB, with some extra wires for engines and rigging, of course, I had to use a lot of masking for painting, because of the color scheme. Hope you will enjoy the final result.
    20 points
  36. Thanks Dennis! I'll probably have to pull off on this at some point to work on some non-scale models for my daughters. But I wanted to get started on the tedious surface work because I was curious to see how difficult it would be and how it would look. Not sure at this point but I think the cowling fit is very good actually. Enough where I'm contemplating leaving it unglued. The gaps you see will, hopefully, be much reduced when the tape attachments get replaced with glue. Thank you! Thanks Matt! Yes, I have a full raft of aftermarket junk for this including lots of Aircraft in Pixels goodies. I was thinking about stretched sprue but decided to go with black CA because it is a known quantity with me. A big plus is no waiting. The fuselage panel lines have been filled. Not all of them but the major lateral ones that I'll be re-scribing. We'll see how the new scribing looks compared to the hatches and other recessed lines that I left alone. Dymo label tape is a scriber's best friend. It's thick, stiff and adhesive... perfect for establishing guide lines for panel scribing. To avoid unnecessary waste, I like to cut the Dymo tape in half, longitudinally. I purposefully cut it messy so I can easily distinguish the straight side. Because the strip is now narrower, it's also easier to slightly curve the tape if necessary. To avoid running into the black CA as much as possible, I've elected to scribe the new panel lines just above or below the existing one. My scriber of choice is the SCR-01 by UMM. It's actually only one I have experience with so I'm not sure how it compares to others. It works for me. I use the "hook" with a pulling motion for straight lines. With the black CA lines still visible, it's hard to make out the scribed lines but they're there. While checking out the reference drawing to lay out the rivet lines, I noticed that the there is no panel line around the base of the horizontal stabilizer... it just magically protrudes from the fuselage. The drawing shows a line around it so I searched the internet and found this photo of the NASM Mc.202 tail. The more I look at this kit, the more surprised I am at the sloppiness/laziness of the Italeri kit designers. Especially since this is such an iconic home-grown subject for them. They could've done better research. Anywho, I made up some templates using the Dymo tape and scribed some lines myself. Using the reference drawing, I added the rivet lines using a soft-leaded pencil. I am using the Kagero book but I'm not following the rivet lines exactly. There are too many for my limited patience and the camo is going to camoflage most of it, visually. The rivets will serve to give some visual detail to the model surfaces but won't be 100% accurate. I used the 1.0mm dot pitch rivet wheel from Galaxy Tools. After the rivets are applied, I sand down the raised plastic around each rivet hole. Looks much better when you do this. It's impossible to tell what the new panel lines and rivets look like so I give the fuselage halves a coat of Mr Primer Surfacer 1000 and a temporary brown wash. I think this selective replacement of the panel lines is a good compromise in improving the overall scale look of the model and not spending crazy hours on filling and scribing.
    20 points
  37. thank you chaps - very kind and keeps me inspired to improve I think that is exactly it John, it is a very different fuselage, no tube central structure with skins like the Tempest either and I guess that elevated position is to see over the huge cowling after another little break abroad, I came back to continue skinning the rear fuselage and fin, and to construct the stabilisters & rudder and skin those too. My refs show a mix of what look like pop rivets and normal countersunk ones on the tailfeathers so I tried to replicate that. It was a mental change to start to do everything in reverse as far as making them and I found it hard to not burnish and sand the metal like I do with countersunk rivets. first the rudder.. ..and the elevators.. .. I think it kinda works, though you basically can't finish the surface as you would abrade the tops off all the rivets.. ..the tailwheel bay was completed with a rod temporarily passing through to lock the leg in place. I have not weathered this or painted the leg yet.. also the fairings need adding still.. ,,and a few glamour shots of how it stands now.. so coming along.. I was thinking about paints and the final colour scheme - I will definately be doing a Royal Navy one, does anyone have any paint recommendations for the FAA Sky & Dark Grey colours, I normally try and use MRP, but I can't see they do these colours. I am less worried about who makes it, but do want it to look right so it is accurate colours I need - I have seen some great builds over the years but not found (or more like retained..) much info on these.. TTFN Peter
    20 points
  38. Thanks guys! Just putting on the finishing touches on the paint job before moving on to decals. Here is a tiny bit of red seeping under the mask on the roundel that I want to fix. I've saved the used masks so a couple of these are put back into place. Two little shots of white with the airbrush should suffice. The fixed roundel. The squadron badge of No. 41 Squadron is sprayed onto the nose. I had a custom decal printed but due to the transparency, I thought it would turn out better painted. The fin flashes were painted as well. I didn't do the tape routine on the tail so I wasn't surprised when I got a bit of paint lift. The big paint lift area was treated with Micromesh to feather the edges down. Again, the primer layer helps alot. The Ocean Gray is sprayed back on. For these open area repairs, I use a little thicker mix of paint to help hide the edges. Repair is complete. The painting stage is finally complete. I didn't document it but the yellow ID strips on the leading edge were painted. After I make a last inspection of the paint, I'll give her a gloss coat and we can move on to the decals.
    20 points
  39. Edging myself close to the finish line on this one with the various small bits and pieces added and masks removed Just the flash suppressors to add and some final weathering. Regards. Andy
    20 points
  40. Thanks Kev, I'm trying to raise the bar all the time, and I'm glad I did! Thanks John, I think my investment in the Infinity has paid off! Ah thanks for the information Mike. I laughed a lot reading your message Paolo, because yes, it's a crazy camouflage, but it's not over yet, because here comes the yellow and I still have the 8 crosses to do, not to mention the JG 54 insignia and the pilot's personal badge. So the yellow... Well, there is yellow one everywhere! At the back of the fuselage, rudder, on the engine cowl, on the ailerons and even on the flaps! There must have been a big promotion on the price of yellow paint in the local supermarket! The most important thing, as you can imagine, is to hide as precisely as possible the areas where the yellow is going to be painted, but also all around to avoid overspray. But before painting the yellow, I painted a very thin layer of white to make it easier for myself. There you go: I was careful not to put too much yellow on the engine cowl to leave the hedgerows visible through transparency, as in the photo below:
    20 points
  41. A small update from my bench. Well, I say small. Nothing is small with this thing. I’ve finally finished the construction of both wings. There are gaps to fill, etc but I’m gonna be doing that all in one job before the paintwork starts. For now, I can shelve both wings and call them done enough for me to move onto the next phase of construction……the nose and fuselage. Here is the latest, before they’re boxed up safely.
    20 points
  42. Dandiego

    1:32 Cutlass

    Nearing completion. Gloss coat and decals will be next. Thanks, Dan
    20 points
  43. Hi Everyone, First post here on LSP. I've been browsing for a while and though I would join in. This is the Trumpeter razorback kit. Kits world decals used. Finished using Vallejo/ Hataka paints. So this my interpretation of this scheme. I decided to show full invasion stripes. All the best and Happy Sticking! Gary
    19 points
  44. 19 points
  45. Firts of all - I really hated this build. This kit is overengineered, made of brittle milky plastic... brrrr.... e.g. one thing - if you want to build it with flaps raised - as I did - you may expect vast empty spaces between the flaps to be filled with styrene inserts... similiar problem occured whit wings. And these are not the only faults of this kit. It was build mostly out of the box with Eduard's seatbelts, some wiring added to the cocpit and engine. I've also printed my own Italian stencils decals. The rest of decals have been taken from different kits / sets. I took quite a lot of time but I'm quite happy with the result - I've painted it with MRP International Orange. There are a lot of subtle shades of this color - and quite a lot of delicate weathering. And there is the problem - my camera goes crazy each time I try to take a picture. Everything is just red - white - without any details :-( I've done my best to select several pictures which are just acceptable... But there it is - Aeronautica Miltare T-6G Texan in livery of 304 Gruppo di Volo, III Regione Aerea, Bari 1970. You'll like it - or not - but how many Italian Texans in plastic have you seen? Enjoy! (I hope..)
    19 points
  46. Final furlong on the Dart Kitten model. Paint polished and new parts CADed up/printed: fuel filler cap, fire extinguisher (now fitted), rudder pedals/heel rests, engine mounts, tail skid and headrest (also now fitted). Just the instrument panel to finish, windscreen to fabricate - and the outer/inner wing joint covers from aluminium Litho plate. Will be glad to see this finally done... Blue skies! Iain
    19 points
  47. Just to wrap up the contents of the Italeri boxing of the Folgore. We have an extensive photoetch fret. It was enclosed in a plastic sleeve that was open on one end, so it got loose and a few parts got bent out of shape. Most of the tiny pieces are meant to detail the joints of the control surfaces. The clear sprue is very small due to the small size of the canopy and windscreen on the Folgore. And finally... here is a close-up look at the 3D instrument panel. I'm not sure I like this option and have an alternative (Yahu) to consider. Jumping into the present... one of the things that I want to address on this build is the size of the panel lines on this kit. Thankfully, there aren't that many of them so it shouldn't be too hard to fill them. Re-scribing them might be tricky as they are long and straight. I'm going to add rivets as well. To get a better feel of what I'm dealing with, I thought I'd try to tape together the major components. Fit looks decent. Not Tamiya good but just the fact I was able to do this is an indication of good fit. I have zero intention of posing the engine or gun cowling open so I wanted to see what the panels look like in the closed position. Pretty good from this preliminary dry fit. One issue is the wing root. There might be fit issues here and the molding of the fasteners on the fuselage side of the joint is atrocious. Again, just the fact that I'm able to hold the model with just tape holding it together is a good sign. Checking to see how the clear parts fit. Again, fit looks rather good. To my eyes, the panel lines on the wings don't look as bad as the fuselage. So the initial plan is to fill and re-scribe the fuselage. Depending on how that goes, I'll decide whether or not I want to do the wings. I'm going to fill the fuselage panel lines with black CA glue. I was initially going to use debonder to reduce sanding effort but since I want a flush finish, debonder doesn't really help. The panel lines have been filled. Next is re-scribing. I'm leery of trying to scribe directly on top of the black CA so I'm planning to scribe just above or below.
    19 points
  48. Thanks for the encouragement guys. Trying to move this build forward. The Dark Green has been restored on the fuselage. I've also added the wing walkway lines and painted out the Sky fuselage band using a darker Ocean Gray. The big test is coming up... masking the fuselage markings!
    19 points
  49. Hello All! Yep, still here and the old girl has not been banished to the big cupboard of Doom... In fact, as you will see, I have been rather busy and indeed, a little bonkers... So, bit of an update first; Here she is, control cable installed, just before she is buttoned up: Also added the dimmer switch and terminal box for the gunsight. One of the joys of 1/24 is you can use more things to turn into something else; the oxygen hose is a guitar string! This is where is gets a little..... Over the years, a few of you have called me, well, insane! There are rational reasons for my insanity... The Airfix moulding for this spit is superb but I could not an cannot get passed the divots (wife calls them acne scars) that represent the rivets. I went to Duxford to see the riveting on a Mk.IX which I think we all know now is flush. After a few discerning looks from people, I pretty much had my mind made up... Then there is the canning; Airfix have only done half the job. All the Spits I have seen are very heavily canned and Airfix have moulded a completely uniform canning representation; not how the girls are! Plus the wings and tail are not canned at all. Then there is the final issues that every kit manufacturer makes the same mistake with: it's a stressed skin construction so the skin overlaps! The final point I will make is May, yes May. See the way the light shows off the canning and the stressed skin effect on the rear fuselage? All of the above meant one thing and in my head it was going to be a fairly painless task I AM GOING TO RIVET THE ENTIRE AIRCRAFT!! i know, insane right? Here's how I did it: Using the Divots as centre points, I drilled every one with a 0.4mm PCB Drill to produce 'blind' holes. I used Dymo Tape to act as a good solid line and guide, then scraped away the join lines on the kit in the correct places to produce the overlaps I bought a shed load of 0.3mm styrene rod; 2m of it went into the fuselage.. I cut the rod to about 10mm each, put them in the holes a panel line at a time then dabbed Tamiya Quick set thin around them; If Pinhead from Hellraiser had a Spitfire. We all know this is impossible as all Spitfires go to heaven... Then I cut them off with a good pair of nippers, then repeat to reuse! After that some saning down... Then, the WHOLE thing was canned with brand new scalpel blade and then much sanding. After some initial testing, no matter what you do (I think because the Evergreen Rod is harder) the rivets stay as rivets just enough to feel. After some other additions, here is the finished result: I put aluminium tube in for the trestle points The under trestle point is often overlooked... The Brass Access Points are 0.8mm Type A Bolt Heads pushed into the plastic The brass photo etch in front of the windscreen mimics the actual aircraft; it is the access panel for the glycol de-icing heads I also put in the front cross members ready for the fuel tank Service records from ML407 are a bit sketchy but she did see a fair bit of action. Please bare with me on the rear access hatch; she received flak damage over Germany and this is my representation of it, going to make a thing of it later The Doubler Plate behind the cockpit is from another service and skin fatigue was evident; not a clue where but it makes an interesting story of perhaps this is why she was chosen as a twin seater conversion later?? Johnnie Houlton was instrumental in the development of the Mk.II Gyro Gunsight so I gave this some special attention.. I class Richard at Magic Scale Modelling as a friend but this statement is without bias I promise; I cannot stress how MSM Kits change a model kit, with so much effort going into a cockpit, lighting it up makes a huge difference and shows off the work of course. AND! My Mk.II Gyro Gunsight Works!!! Thanks so much for looking.. Cheers Steve
    19 points
  50. Thanks Matt! Yes, that is the plan since the barrels fit very nicely and I don't need to fill the joint. Painted brass parts always chip on me so leaving them off until the end will help prevent that. Thank you Kevin and John! Thanks John! I'm sure the prop wear seems excessive to some but being so front and center on the model, it's appropriate for the prop to wear the kind of weathering message I want to convey. Yes, the gun barrels are Master brass parts. The gun tips were painted with Mr Metal Color Iron (MC212). Very cool paint... it sprays dead matte but it is buffable. After spraying, I used a cotton bud to make it shiny. Thank you! I had to Google Faire Gannet to appreciate the humor. Because in all seriousness, I'm not planning on a Gannet any time soon! In preparation of the painting to come, the miscellaneous openings are covered. I used tape for the cockpit. Wet tissue paper was plugged into the wheel wells. Actually toilet paper but tissue sounds less disgusting. A very light (and uneven) coat of primer (Mr Primer Surfacer 1000) was sprayed over the entire model. Typically, I skip this skip to preserve the surface details as much as possible but with all of the panels that I glued into the wing, I thought a primer coat would help me check all those joints one final time, as well reduce the risk of paint lift when I spray the markings using adhesive masks. After the primer coat dried, I buffed it with a clean t-shirt to get rid of any "dusty" areas where the primer sprayed rough. My normal pre-shading layer was then applied. Thinned black over all of the panel lines and fasteners but not the rivets. Sloppy is good here since I don't my pre-shading effects to be too uniform.
    19 points
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