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  1. After lurking around for years going completely under the radar , getting tons of tips and inspiration, it's finally time to post something This build was a joint effort with my good friend Cato. We made this model for a local regimental museum that has built up a theme around some artifacts that belonged to fellow Norwegian Johan Koren Christie. Johan trained as a pilot in the Norwegian Army Flying Corps in the late twenties. He fled Norway, after the capitulation in 1940 and volunteered for the RAF in 1942. After almost being kicked out from basic training, that he still managed to pass because Bomber Command was suffering so heavy casualties and desperately needed replacements. He was then being transferred to 35th Pathfinder Squadron as a pilot he flew 46 operational sorties most of, in a Halifax, but also a few in a Avro Lancaster. Our model is supposed to illustrate one of the latter sorties. The HK model goes well together without too much trouble, but the size makes it more demanding than the normal, simply because you must basically have the model stationary and move around it, and not just keep it in your hand. Anyway an enjoyable build, the next one will be a single engine, single seater, just for the pure therapy , The museum staff working on the shadow box. Wood frame and photoshopped aerial reconnaissance photograph printed on an aluminium plate.
    41 points
  2. Bonjour tout le monde Ca fait longtemps que je n'ai rien posté sur le forum , alors j'ai quelques trucs à vous montrer ..... je commence par la dernière finition juste pour aujourd'hui ....... il y aura plus à suivre Bearcat Trumpeter échelle 1/32 , guerre d'Indochine bataille de Diên Biêm Phu ,F8F1-b du GC 1/22 Saintonge sources photos french wings Bye Bye
    39 points
  3. Hello guys, at this topic I will show you one of greatest jets, served in our AF. The project is inspirited by this plane: For this target I've used trumpeter 1/32 scale Mig-21 MF. To became into a BIS I re-worked the nose-cone, nose itself, the back of the mig and a lot small details that make 21 into Bis. For interior I used Redfox 3d print for MF and re-work it also, CWS, BigEd from Eduard, Master, Aires, Quickboost, Armory, Begemot and home-made decals. As always acrylic tamiya for painting. Enamels, oils and acrylic pencils for weathering. So here she is: Hope you will like her Thanks as always for stopping by. Cheers friends.
    37 points
  4. October 14/21 I’ve been a modeling machine the last few days! Colder weather and not much to do outside = more modeling inside, especially with the shorter days. I assembled the left lower wing much like the right one shown earlier. Unlike the right wing however, I didn’t carefully sand down the many ribs that will never be seen again, so I used a #11 knife and hacked away at will. Not pretty, but very effective and a lot quicker! One thing I should have mentioned earlier, is on the recessed outboard gun shroud, Part G40 or H40, they should be tilted slightly downward when gluing them in. This was discovered when I placed the upper wing on top of the lower wing and checked alignment from the front. Just glued in as per the instructions will result in misalignment. You don’t want to see any of the front part of the shroud when looking through the gun hole and tilting them downwards eliminated any of that. This kit continues to amaze me by how some parts don’t fit very well, while others fit like a glove. Here is the interlocking join at the top of the two wing halves when placed over the central fuselage assembly in Step 103. They just slip together perfectly, creating a solid join that won’t move later. I then dry fit all of the wing parts together in a bit of a trial to see what I was up against in the near future. In Step 104 and 105, I had to laugh when the instructions suggested that Parts N30 and N34 may need their surfaces to be “filed, if required” to allow for sliding into the lower wing and central assembly in Step 108. No kidding, they needed to be sanded down about 20% on every surface before I could get them to slide into anything. One tip is to cut back the bottom notched tab of these parts (top in pic below) to allow the lower wing to slide into the central assembly at an angle. Otherwise, all sorts of tabs on the wings will get in the way and you don’t want to be fooling around with the fit when you have committed to glue. After many hours of getting all the wing parts to dry fit together, the wings look terrific- and long at 21 ½” wide. This size of this model has slowly snuck up on me, because it’s going to be huge and photographing future steps in my small photo booth will be a challenge! A closer look. The bottom. All of those gaps will close up once I commit to glue, or at least I think/hope so. With the wings dry fit, I thought I would check how well the fuselage would fit on top. Not bad, but there is a big gap at the front. Same on the bottom at the rear. Like everything else on this model, the problem lies with joins that fit too tight. It turns out that the forward cockpit floor is too wide, so it was trimmed back a bit, as where the two tabs at the front. The two inserts at the top of the wings need to be widened as well. Here you can see where the cockpit floor fits between two sills, which you can barely see from the top of the cockpit. As a result, these areas should be painted Interior Green before gluing everything together, which is not mentioned in the instructions. Everything fits together pretty good now and with a bit of glue, it will look a lot tighter than this. No wing roots seams to fill for a change. Hurray! Same for the bottom when dry fitting. With some glue and a bit of pressure, there should be no gaps. Now that I’ve got everything to more or less fit properly, the next step is to paint the wheel wells and anything else that will be exposed underneath. Unfortunately, everything will be gloss dark blue like the rest of the aircraft, which is kind of boring and details within will be hard to see. I also need to insert 2 formation lights at the top of the wings and the landing light at the front of the left wing before I commit to glue. While I have pics of the landing light and generally know what to do with it, the instructions do not tell you what color the formation lights are. A query in the Aviation Forum reveals that they are blue, which is why they are hard to see in pics. More blue against a dark blue background….. One thing that you might find missing from this build is a lack of Tamiya Panel Line Accent Color that I usually apply to show all the panel lines and rivet detail in my builds. I do this when adding or repairing panel lines and fasteners, to check for flaws. For this kit, it’s a waste of time because every part has nice crisp detail that needs no enhancement and panel lines mesh perfectly, which I’ve never experienced before, including on my Tamiya Spitfire and Mustang builds. Overall, this has to be one of the best kits made ever. I’m really enjoying this kit so far and despite my complaints about tight fitting parts, I would much rather have them tight than sloppy. I can tell already that if I don’t screw it up, this will be a very impressive model to add to my growing collection. Now if I could only find room for it….. Cheers, Chuck
    37 points
  5. mc65

    F86K 1/32 Kittyhawk

    hi all, here a "Kappone" (big K) built on request of a colleauge of mine, itself being the son of a pilot serving in the Aeronautica Militare Italiana, 51° stormo, in the 60ties. strange enough, being an aircraft built by Fiat on license from North American, there is not so much references about it. so, I mantained a low profile attitude, trying to hold off my rivet counter attitude and finish it in a reasonable time to present it to the unaware final recipient. I just added an Eduard set, very useful in the cockpit area, and made some stencils for the italian codes to emulate the 51-32, serial 54858, aircraft of the "pluto" group with the red tail, to wich was attached my colleauge's father. the only thing I modified was the angle of the opened speed brakes, totally mistaken by KH. painted with Alclad II and fitted with beautiful HGW RBF flags. a simple wooden base with lightly painted sandpaper was made to accomodate it safely. actually I haven't a big feeling with modern era airplanes, but build this one was relaxing and interesting, opening a new mental window toward the post WWII era in my mind. enjoy!
    35 points
  6. September 28/21 I’m back!- or at least partially back with this Hellcat build. As mentioned above I usually take the summer off from modeling and this year was no exception. Now that the weather is getting a bit cooler, I can almost feel the onset of winter and my recharged modeling mojo that goes with it. One thing that can really get you back into the modeling mood is a modeling contest and despite Covid restrictions (must be double vaccinated with proof, always wear a mask, etc.), The Alberta Military Modeling Club had their annual contest a few days ago. I really like this contest, because everything is military for obvious reasons and I’m interested in almost all of it, unlike other contests that have Sci-Fi, Figurine and other models I have zero interest in. I brought along a couple of my models, including my recent CF-104 Starfighter and Hawker Tempest Mk V, which unfortunately competed in the same category of Detailed Single Engine Aircraft. I’m happy to report that the Starfighter won Gold and the Tempest Silver, but more importantly, the CF-104 also won 4 other Special Awards that were not necessarily aircraft related. I was very surprised and humbled, so my hat’s off to the AMMC for putting on such an interesting and rewarding experience for me and many others. I’ll be sure to come back next year, maybe with a 1/24 Hellcat? Speaking of the Hellcat, I left off this build noting that the front fuselage halves would not close and left a gap at the front which I filled with styrene, which wasn’t all bad, since the front windscreen is a bit too wide to begin with. The windscreen is not only a bit too wide, but it’s a bit too tall at the base as well, so I sanded the lower inside part of it on all sides. As I do on all my windscreens and canopies, I then painted the inside frame in gloss black lacquer. Since black won’t let light through, imperfections at the base and around the frame won’t show through and it makes the plastic “glass” appear thinner than it really is. This was followed by a coat of Interior Green, as per references. Dry fit on the fuselage, the windscreen is still a bit too thick and there is a small gap at the base, which is too thick for scale. Surprisingly, the instructions don’t ask for gluing and attaching the windscreen until the very end of the build in Step 297, but if you want to protect the cockpit and alter the windscreen a bit, it should be done now. After gluing on the gunsight permanently with Micro Kristal Klear, I then removed the paint from the base of the windscreen with solvent, then glued it in place using Tamiya Extra Thin Cement, which oozed under the clear plastic and filled the gaps without any fogging. This is a bit tricky, because you want lots of cement under the windscreen to create a secure bond, but you don’t want too much that might be seen from the inside, so it is best done in small iterative steps until you get the look you want. After everything dried, I then sanded down the clear plastic so that it was flush, while leaving a thin panel line. The base of the notch at the rear of the windscreen (on right) is not a real panel line, so I gently sanded the bottom edge to blend it in a bit. With the glue applied earlier, it did not need to be filled. This kit can be built in 3 main versions, with the wings folded, wings not folded and also in flight. Before proceeding with any step, you need to check the top right each page to ensure that you are assembling the version you have chosen. After final assembly of the fuselage in Step 43, I skipped Steps 44 to 51, which are in flight only, then started on Step 51 above. Here is the assembly of the lower fuselage in Steps 52 to 61, with the following observations: - While there is lots of flash and seam lines on most of the parts, it is all easily removed - There are many sink marks, but if you check ahead in the instructions, most of these sink marks are impossible to see during final assembly, so you really don’t need to worry about most of them - The fit of all parts is extraordinary! Everything fits with minimal trimming - While the instructions call for painting the parts in between Steps for ease of painting, I chose not to because I wanted a strong bond using liberal cement in some areas, which would have crazed the paint. I will paint everything as you see below at once, which will be tricky but not impossible A detailed shot of the right side- and also decision time. This is where you can decide if you want the wing flaps up, using flap hinges F3 to F6, or down, using hinges F9 to F-12. As much as I wanted lowered flaps, after a review of many Hellcat pics, the flaps appear to always be in the up position when parked, so I used part F3 to F-6 which as you can see on the left, is even labeled “S1, S2, P1 and P2” noting if they are supposed to be on the Starboard or Port side. So that’s about it for now with not a ton of work, but it’s a start, which will likely really get rolling in November when the snow flies. Cheers, Chuck
    34 points
  7. 1/32 Tamiya Nakajima A6M2-N RUFF the resin float is very heavy and was connected using pins top and bottom, the resin its self isn't very good, its detail is lost in places and needed re drilling and rescribing, any way enjoy Mike
    33 points
  8. Hello friends, wanted to let you participate to my latest work, I think it's worth it, it's not a subject we see very often... so enjoy...or not.. ciao Serge
    32 points
  9. hello a few months finished , spit tamiya out of box , I just add gun's barrels model master , the codes from kagero and the French roundels are painted with stencils Spitfire XVI coded 2Y-P of No 345 squadron RAF, (free french ) groupe de chasse II/2 Berry greeting nice week End
    32 points
  10. October 11/21 Well, the snow did start to fly yesterday, which is a reminder that winter is coming and likely a lot more modeling for me. Working on the wing assemblies, there is a recurring theme in this kit that I also found on the fuselage: a) The surface detail of most parts is excellent. and pin marks are usually on surfaces you can't see at final assembly. b) A great deal of this nice detail will never be seen again once the wings are closed up. This is great for somebody who might want to build a Hellcat under maintenance I suppose, but for 95% of those who build this kit, it’s a waste. This forces you to jump ahead in the instructions, to make sure those pin marks and seam lines you are fixing are going to be worth the effort. c) The fit of most parts are very tight, so if you need any flexibility, you need to open up joins. d) The “oil canning” of the wings is quite nice, but the plastic is quite rough, so you should sand it, being careful to not remove too much relief. This plastic is quite light and hard to photograph, but here’s a shot of the bottom of the right wing to show where I have sanded and where I haven’t. Another shot of the sanded right wing on the top and the unsanded left wing on the bottom. As mentioned earlier I’m not exposing the gun compartments, keeping my focus on detail in the cockpit and exposed engine. As such, I glued the gun covers on, which I recommend that you do before gluing the wing halves together, so that you can reach underneath to smooth out the edges, which can be a little wobbly. Without exposed guns, there’s no reason to put all of the wing parts into the wings, but I’ve read from other builds of this kit that closing the wings can be problematic, so I wanted to find out why. This assembly below is Steps 62 to 80 for the right wing, and the main culprit is that most of the long parts on the bottom fit into narrow recesses in the top of the wing. With the complex pattern of several parts on the bottom, there’s no chance that everything will line up perfectly with the top and when you do have problems closing the wings, there’s no way to figure out where all the fit issues are. It would have been better if the recesses were a bit wider and even better, not there at all. Even with the guns exposed, you cannot see this join at all, so why make it difficult? Even the parts on the bottom fit too tightly, so to get a fit that’s tight to the wing bottom, just about all of the notches that slide together should be slightly wider and deeper using a #11 knife. Once glued together, you will not see any of these imperfections I just created on Part H3, vs unaltered Parts H4 and H5. Getting back to the wing fit, rather than sanding down the recesses on the top wing, I just sanded down the top surfaces of the bottom wing parts. With lots of dry fitting and trial and error, you can get the wing halves to fit together fairly well without forcing anything. With everything hidden, nothing needs to look pretty either. I checked the dry fit of the closed wing halves to the bottom central fuselage completed earlier. This assembly would not sit flush no matter how much I squeezed it together. The culprit here was the top of Part G8 on the wing assembly was too high, as was an outside rod on Part F15 of the fuselage assembly, so I trimmed them both down. Although it’s still a touch high in this pic that I’m calling “Flush”, once the bottom of the assemblies are glued together it will be. I still need to clean up a few seam lines as well. And like so many other things on this kit, all that nice detail will be buried once Part N33 is glued in place in Step 110 for flat wings vs. folded ones. On the bright side, I can get a little messy with my gluing underneath, to ensure a strong bond. On the Hellcat, the outboard gun is recessed, while the inner two guns stick out, where I drilled out the barrels. These two gun are only dry fit and will be installed at the end of the build, allowing me to glue and clean up the leading edge of the wing without any interference. If you want exposed guns, Master makes a nice set of early or late brass barrels to replace the kit parts. I was planning to use the Eduard PE Wheel Bay Kit (23035), but after looking at the kit detail vs the Eduard parts, this was a clear case of “it isn’t worth it”, especially on a bottom surface that will rarely be seen. Other than the fact that the kit parts look pretty good already, all that PE ribbing needs to be assembled and glued on, with all the headaches that come with that. Another issue is that some of the other kit parts need to fit this detail and be glued securely to it. A clear “Punt” in my mind, although I may use a few of the smaller parts later. We'll see...... Next steps are to get the other wing put together and then glue the wings to the lower central fuselage assembly, and then final attachment to the main fuselage itself. Having tried a few dry fits already, I already know that I have plenty of challenges ahead of me! Cheers, Chuck
    32 points
  11. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    so here we are with a big update placed the viggen on a base time to work on the exhaust so now time to dryfit a wing and no i cant stop with one wing Still needs adjustments but you get the idee thats it for now Mark
    31 points
  12. Revells IX converted to VIII. Kagero Decals for "Hava Go Jo!" plane. Nice kit, fast to build, but needs some adjustments and corrections. Wobbly landing gear requires metal replacement or needle inside.
    30 points
  13. Roughly 1/32 the cost of a real one. Kev
    30 points
  14. Dandiego

    Vigilante

    Ok here is my new project. First a little history. I grew up on the China Lake naval base in the late 50's and early 60's. Yes I am that old. Anyway I would see all of the Navy jets flying over the town almost everyday. And when I got a little older I could ride a bus out to the airfield on Armed Forces day and walk around the real jets. Early jets are in my blood. So where to start? Here is where. Years ago I started a 1:48th Vigi and with the Cutting Edge conversion I began building an A3J. Got pretty far along but...you know how it goes. Shelf of Doom for at least 15 years. So this is my starting point. I will use the SOD model and try to reproduce it in 1:32. Yes I will look at 3 view drawings but this is my main reference. With some calipers, some crude drawings and basic cad knowledge I am off. First I began with the central fuselage. Basically a rectangular box with some rounded edges. It was too big to print all at once on my machine so....2 pieces. You can see that I have incorporated some cutouts for the MLG bays. Almost 7 inches tall already. I have also added wing roots onto the fuselage sides. I tried designing in some tabs to aid in alignment and construction. They didn't print as well as I had hoped. Here are the intakes still sitting on the print stage. Lots more to come. Dan
    29 points
  15. October 21/21 As much as I’m enjoying this kit, the wing assembly is difficult if you don’t want any obvious errors, so I’ve come up with a plan that seems to have worked pretty good so far. After getting all the main internal wing parts sanded or trimmed down so that the main wing halves will close without too much effort, I pre-painted all of the wheel wells and other recesses, like the gun ports. Good or bad, everything is gloss Sea Blue and I’m using MRP-014, which is made for the US Navy, 1942-1955 (ANA623, ANA606), which is really, really dark. I’m not sure if I’m going to lighten this paint or not, because pics of real Hellcats are quite dark and as a subject towards the end of the war, fading due to weathering would likely be minimal. The instruction in Steps 102/103 would have you glue both top wing halves to the bottom central fuselage assembly, then glue the bottom wing halves in Steps 108/109. While this works OK, it’s fairly hard to jamb everything together this way, so I decided to just push one bottom wing half into this assembly as a dry fit, then glue the top of one wing to both, in this case the right wing. With all the sanding and dry fitting I did earlier, I knew exactly which parts would attach directly to the top wing, so I applied ample ordinary Tamiya glue to the areas marked in purple, and left the outside edges unglued for now. Note that I avoided adding glue to parts that will be seen in the wheel well, just in case it made a mess on painted parts they attach to. This creates a very strong bond in the core of the wing and allows a bit of movement to get the best fit of all portions of the wing. I then applied Tamiya Extra Thin Cement (TETC) to the outside edges of the wing, using tape and clamps to hold everything tight. While the front of the wing closed together fairly well, the rear of the wing did not and needed a bit of extra glue and clamping to get the two wing halves to close completely. This left a bit of a rough surface at the rear, which I sanded fairly smooth to get the lumps out, but not perfectly, then I pre-painted the rear lip which is quite thin. This is because the rear of the wing will be hidden behind the aileron and flap parts in the flat position and a bit less so when they are in the down position. Here are these parts that were glued together earlier, where I found that only the actuator rod will show later, so the seam line should be removed. Here they are dry fit to the wing bottom. As always, a very tight fit that needed a bit of trimming to make everything come together. So tight in fact, that I doubt I will need to glue the flaps at all. The top fit. Note that the 2 lights on the top of the wing are Formation Lights that were painted clear blue and glued into place earlier. Once the wing halves are glued together, an angle brace, Part G34 or H34 as applicable, is glued into place. Here I painted the part separately, attached it with TETC, then re-sprayed it to eliminate any glue marks. Note that the other parts nearby mesh with the top of the wing fairly well without any glue, which was avoided earlier. The other side, however, is super annoying, because there are 2 more angle braces with a large gap in the middle of them where the two assemblies came together. If they could have added an angle brace above later, why not 2 more on the other side? Fixing this cleanly will be very tough to do in such a small space that needs to be painted smooth. I may punt on this one, especially since I won't be adding any plumbing, which you can't see anyway. Wing Part N33 (N29 on other side) needs to be carefully sanded and trimmed to fit nice and tight, which also covers a lot of the nice internal wing detail that was shown earlier. With the wings folded this part is re-positioned as Parts N19/20 and N35/36, allowing visual access. The front of the wing was easy to glue together, but getting the gun panels to fit together cleanly was a lot of work. They clearly exist on the real deal, although maybe a bit more flush and subtle than they look here. I sprayed the front of the wing to check my seam work, which as you can see still has some lumpy spots to smooth out and fix, although the wing is lumpy anyway, so maybe not! The corner navigation light lens did not fit very well at all, so the recess it fits onto was carefully sanded and trimmed several times until it did. This is dry fit only and will be glued on later in the build before final paint, so that I can work on smoothing out the edges. Another curiosity is those 3 round lumps at the end of the wings, that look like they may be molding flaws that should be removed. Since I saw them on both wing halves, and they meshed together, I checked out some reference pics and sure enough, they are real, so make sure you retain them. That’s it for now. After I do a few more repairs on this right wing, I’ll get after the left wing and do much of the same thing to create one very long wing and landing gear assembly! Cheers, Chuck
    29 points
  16. This last weekend,ably assisted by the Memsahib ( I know ive spelt this wrong) , I gave a number of my builds an airing at the Inaugural "Blue Light Expo" hosted by West Midlands Police model club at Tally Ho! training centre Birmingham. I packed up whatever I could transport safely in the car and set off. Arriving relatively unscathed (one gear door detached) I set up and hoisted the banner. I have to say, after a good length of time being "show starved" we had a great turnout of clubs traders and public alike also bumped into Ollie Holmes who displayed his Swiss Hunter on the table. Unfortunately I couldn't really buy much other than a set of Valejo French airforce paints for the forthcoming Mirage and,,,, oh yes a Zoukei Henschel 129!!! Anyhow, heres a couple of photos, and roll on Telford.
    29 points
  17. Hey all- The old girl took gold and best aircraft today at ValleyCon 21- cheers P
    29 points
  18. Ok, so because I didnt want to do this after I had all my lovely surface detail done I didnt take many photos of the first (left) side being done. But with a buffed shiny surface the issue just glared at me even more. I tried telling myself that with a flat finish no one will ever notice....but it was an issue for me mentally. This is where I started, by fixing the upper curve of the intake section through to the intake opening. This is just the beginning as I went further back from here. But I have taken more of the other side in progress. Once the top profile was 'tweaked' I then had to build up the front section with CA as seen here. This was part of the way through the building up process The left side finished as best I can, notice how much thicker the forward section now is. Also of note is the lower intake lip being modified I think the 'hump' looks better now too More rounded and far more accurate across the top too Lower lip looking better now too... All the time this was going on I continued with surface details on the Right side..... And a bit of an overall shot, to make me feel like I am making progress...... So there we go, I am making progress but it is slow, thanks for tuning in and I hope this was of interest to some Cheers Anthony
    29 points
  19. 1/32 Special Hobby Model Eduard PE parts & wheels set. Decals from Kitty Hawk model All Colours MRP.
    29 points
  20. Revell kit 1/32, HGW rivet set & wet transfers stencils. Eduard Look, Barracuda wheels, All colours MRP
    28 points
  21. Evening all, I've spent a bit more time at the bench this week, as well as seeing a 1:1 scale Sunderland in the flesh - well a Sandringham actually but close enough. We had a weekend down in Southampton and whilst there I sweet-talked the wife into letting me spend an afternoon at the Solent Sky Museum. If you're in the area it's well worth a visit - lots of great exhibits and history about Southampton during the war years but the star attraction for me was of course their rather beautiful Sandringham that used to fly for Ansett: They even let you dive inside - the interior is a little different to the one I'm building but it was great to have a nose around nevertheless. I imagine this example is a bit more comfortable than the Sunderland! The main reason for my visit was photograph and have a measure of the beaching gear which is a job I'm going to be tackling soon, and I managed to get plenty of useful reference shots: On to the model itself, I thought it time to have a closer look at the transparencies. It's important to get the fit of these correct just in case there was some additional structural work to be done before commencing on making their interiors. The turrets were carefully cut from the backing sheet and test fitted to the model. Here's the rear and mid-upper in situ - both fit really well: The only work needed here was build up the rear turret fairing a little more with card and Milliput. The cockpit glazing itself fits remarkably well - phew! For the nose turret, the MkII I'm building still had the early type fitted. This will be installed in the fully retracted position so I have made and added a platform for it to sit on as well as adding the details around the opening itself: The props have also been painted and lightly weathered: And look the part when installed on the engines: And that, boys and girls, brings you up to speed. Until next time, Tom
    28 points
  22. Thanks everyone Can't believe it's been over a month since I last updated - life has got in the way, with a bit of returning to the office in London for the day job (sadly..) Well thansk OBG, they are really useful and high quality - much appreciated Hi Craig - I wish I could make them! No, I get things like that from RB Motion - they are car bits and the site is worth a surf for bobbins like that So the build has lurched from highly precise focused detailing, to low end agrigultural heavy engineering.. I was getting carried away in the cockpit at a time when there is still loads of basic structural stuff to be done.. ..first up, there is nothing for the UC bays - these are unfortunately really complex so I am going to have to simplify when the time comes to detailing as otherwise I will be in there for months on end.. ..they don't look so bad here, but trust me there is a lot going on both structurally and in bits & bobs credit to the photographer shown ..I started by taking a slice of the plan drawing I have and drawing out the area I need to cut out that sits below the skin - also added ribbing locations as far as I could determine from photo's ..then cut into the balsa cores - you can see the brass reinforcement plates put in ages ago to hold the gear legs later.. ..you can also see how the wheel cut-out area eats right into the fuselage exposing the structure and lego blocks in there (!)... ..floors were marked out in card with the rib positions.. ..after the floors were added, walls were added and a few gaps & dinks filled in.. as the wings slide on and off the wheel bay area is fixed to the wing but slides out from the fuselage as one.. ..and with a shot of primer the basics are there to build on - I have a guy coming from Axminster lathes on friday to fix my little C2 (no power) so hope to start turning the legs and epoxy in the mounting stubs in the next few weeks ..the next bit I had been putting off are the mould bucks for the transparencies - if you see the shape of the main hood you can see why I was stalling.. ..I also found this drawing which I took as good enough to get some profiles.. ..first step was to get some outline boundaries from the plans and translate them to 3D so I can see basics like the angle of the windshield and the shapes generally.. ..I made up a plastic card frame with flat parts front and back so the blown bit starts at the right point - this is coloured black with a sharpie so I can see my sanding limit after I fill it - if you don't the card is white when you hit it and stays white while you sand right through the boundary (tell me how I know..).. ..filled with P38 and first pass sanded.. ..primered and nearly done - the blown bits look ok in the end.. ..same with the rear - balsa used to save on filler.. ..and this is where they are at.. ..anyone who has seen my build logs will know I HATE doing transparencies - they are my nemesis.. I spoke to John Wilkes (Tigger) and got some great advice on how to turn these masters into masters to actually get good pulls from. The main problem now is that these have a lot of filler & primer and the heat of the plastic causes that to melt, deform, delaminate onto your canopy etc. What he said was use them to get one good shape pull using PETG and the fill that pull with Filler like Herculite to make a better master that can take the punishment.. so that's where I am at - until next time Peter
    28 points
  23. One of my favorite planes, one of my favorite kits. Here is the new member of my collection... Cheers, John
    27 points
  24. It's been a while since I updated this thread but work is continuing in the background on the big B-24D. Since last time, I've painted the engines and installed the nacelles onto the wings: Undersides: The tail assembly has also been completed and added - along with the rear turret. The unsightly join has been minimised with painting the mating surfaces black before joining and although not perfect, it's certainly better than simply sticking the parts together. I've also added the 2nd Air Division white circle on the tail which will be masked before the OD goes on: I now need to finish off the cockpit and nose interior before adding the final transparencies and she gets a splash of paint: Until next time, Tom
    27 points
  25. Bonjour aujourd'hui je vous propose un razorback de l'armée de l'air P47 42--26157 spa 84 1944 Alto Corsica côte à côte avec le 56FG photo eduard gravée, roues en résine, gun's barrels Aber , décalcomanies berna, peinture à l'acrylique Gunze et couleurs réelles AK, lavis à l'huile et pastels divers la vraie cruche française Tchin Tchin !
    27 points
  26. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    thank you all still working on the cockpit still needs 2 parts the hud and the safty handle for the seat. So far so good next up front wheelbay Mark
    27 points
  27. In this next case with paint on the main airframe, it was 3 steps forward and 1/2 step back. I had nicely painted the background for the #1 Du Me Mi text, and even let it cure and started on the red text itself. It was an unmitigated disaster. I applied the text mask, and although the cutter seemed to do ok with it, the text was so small in parts that the color really didn't lay down well from the jump. I ended up trying to sand off the red text, then the white started chipping off, not sanding and filled with some Tamiya fine white. I touched that too soon by taking the masks off too early and pealed some of it up. Then while sanding had the rest of the primer flake off. I just rough sanded the WHOLE upper port side engine housing, then fine sanded it again, and then primed with black and then painted with black............again.........just to get back to where I was before the white background. After an experiment with the ICM decals, I've decided I'm just going to use the full OOB #1 Du Me Mi decal with no white paint background. Tests seem to confirm the decals are actually opaque enough to do this successfully. This next part was honestly the part that scared me a bit. The shark mouth is notoriously tricky, and even more so as a decal. I'm honestly not sure how anyone might have successfully applied the OOB shark mouth decal to this model. I guess maybe easier for some than others, but I have dire difficulties with two things in modeling; decals and clear parts, neither of which I'm overly fond of dealing with but both seem inevitable. Just prior to masking the full shark mouth, I got the rear tail 4th Cav pendant and tail Ident numbers masked and painted as well. I have over masked them here, prior to shooting the red for the tail/shark mouth. The red I'm using for both the shark mouth and the rear horizontal tail fins is MRP-299 Insignia red. In this case I got exactly what I was looking for, in that its the same red on the shark mouth and tail fins, but they look completely different because the base for the shark mouth is white, and the base for the fins was left black. The shark mouth mask was a process, but having done this a few times and REALLY messed things up, I found out what not to do......and what to do. Fortunately, this method means more adhesion for the masks themselves because you are leaving the inside or positive portion of the mask here as apposed to the outside or negative part. I will eventually go back over all this with black as needed before the OD. It was a complex mask, but turned out rather well and ended up spaying the same.The MRP-299 sprayed heavenly. We have red! I feel like I'm on a roll with this model, so Im going to chase that addictive feeling when things are going well and turning out as youd hoped. Cheers!
    26 points
  28. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    small stuff done the braces between the intake and feuselage middel part on the front part the instructions tell you to put the airscoops on before the 2 parts go tougheter but then it will be hard to sand the seam because off the placment off the parts Not a tamiya fit but with some sanding no problem with mine Also some primer on. next up reaer part and afterburner section Mark
    26 points
  29. Thank you all for your concern for our health. We are both fully recovered and doing well. As Kag mentioned, the site is back open and in the process of being restocked. Cheers, Damian
    26 points
  30. I started some ancillary work that needed to be done, such as prepping interior parts that will go on the glass, small radar fin on the rear, small stub under-wing parts, pitot tube, priming then painting the interiors of the glass, as well as the main rotor mast and two piece main rotor blades. I was a bit apprehensive about the two piece rotor blades, as I was not too sure about what scale thickness they would end up looking like. I cut the 4 rotor parts off the sprue and found my first bit of flash in the kit. This of course was easily dispatched with a razor blade and sanding stick. They were in the same spot on each blade half: I clamped both finished rotor blades, and set them aside to cure: I cut a few the the smaller things off the sprues and prepped them, and afterword I clipped off the main rotor mast, which is a single molded piece of plastic with part of the scissor/sleeve assembly molded in with nubs on it to connect the pitch links: Not a very sturdy arrangement to me, and with it being solid plastic like the skid connections, it tended to bend and flex all over the place. I decided to replace the mast itself with some appropriately sized stainless steel tubing, and just cut off the scissor/sleeve assembly: So that is exactly what I did, and after straightening the part around the new mast, I glued it in place with CA: I also got the interior of the glass parts painted, as well as taking a look at the main rotor blades after they had cured: My hesitancy about the two part blades was unwarranted IMHO, as they seem very thin in scale appearance, and went together very well. They also sanded down fairly easily, and have a bit of droop built in to them: With some of the minor stuff taken care of, including masking off the chin turret, I got down to the business of getting the main skids glued in their final resting places. This was a bit nerve racking since it was mainly guesswork on my part as far as angles and spaces goes. Whatever happened, I just wanted to make sure both the skids where flat on the ground when the bird is at rest: That's all for tonight folks! I am going to let the glue on the skids cure overnight, and then will be back on the Cobra tomorrow, getting the remaining Quinta Studios pieces into place on the canopy interior. Cheers!
    25 points
  31. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    thank you all small progress on the pit working on the side consoles first one in place and a part off the seat so far so good Mark
    25 points
  32. As promised, pics of the start of the fix for the skids. The first step was to clean up the area around where the OOB skid nubs broke off inside the fuselage. Fortunately in this case I used some Tamiya fast evap extra thin cement and the pegs where fully welded in and were easy to sand flat and re-scribe. I still have yet to do any finish sanding or cleanup here: Next up was a start to fixing the skid kids themselves. First off I smoothed out the ends where the nubs broke off, and center punched (delicately) where the previous nubs had been. Then after a quick pass or two with the sanding stick, I used consecutive sized mini drill bits to bore holes from the center of where the nubs used to be right through and out of the front top of the skids. This was NOT pretty, but I had a plan......... Past experiments with hardened steel piano wire are two fold: One, it is very strong and the perfect rigidity for this kind of fix. Two, while piano wire is workable it still is metal wire and in the case of the Cobra, this meant slightly thicker steel rod, and that meant it was going to be tough to cut. That being said, the OOB landing skids are thin plastic prone to warping out of shape without super heating any thick wire. Wire that thick is hard to cut and creates a lot of heat, so piano wire was out for my plan. I grabbed some suitably thick carbon fiber rods I had on hand from some R/C parts I had and cut them into 4 workable 1"/25mm pieces. I then saturated those in very thin CA. After the CA was dry, I imbedded them in the skids making sure to keep them at the right angle horizontally, as well as lining them up perpendicular to the fuse. Once the carbon fiber rods were tac glued in place with thin CA, I came back later and filled in all the surrounding area with very thick CA. Again it was not pretty at this early stage, but knowing it was super strong and flexible carbon fiber in there instead of steel, I knew it was going to be way easier to work once everything had a chance to harden off.: The next part of my plan involved some appropriately sized stainless steel tubing. I drilled the correct holes exactly over the top of where the OOB nubs were, cleaned up the holes and made sure the tubing fit. You can kinda-sorta see where I'm taking this: Once glued in they will sit something like this, a bit proud of the surface. Probably even slightly less than this, but this is just an estimate. In the end they will ever so slightly embed inside the skid base to make a much more stable and stout base for the skids: As I had hoped, the carbon fiber rods remained very strong and light of course, but unlike the same sized steel rod, I also found them to be extremely easy to work. They sanded perfectly and I used my Dremel to make short work of the carbon/CA mix and got the skid mains roughly but delicately smoothed out. After the Dremel work I used some sanding sticks to take it down until it was just a bit more smooth, but still rough enough to have a bit of bite for the forthcoming step. I then mixed up some JB Weld, and slathered that all around the top and bottom of the main part of the skids. The carbon fiber rods remained sandwiched in mix, and since they were sanded down a bit, all I have to do is sand down the JB Weld a bit and should be GTG. The JBW was smoothed out prior to setting with some Mr Color thinner to make the eventual sanding stage easier: This all hopefully will lead to a much more stable and strong landing gear set up. I still do believe the best solution to this would be to have Ali work his magic on these and make a set of sturdy and strong brass landing skids for the Cobra. The JB Weld should be cured well be later today, so should be good to sand them smooth in prep for some primer and possibly some filler. Cheers and thanks for looking in on me
    24 points
  33. Hot off the press on the Border Model Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=872466436716346&id=339312286698433 For those who can't access or read the post, here it is: Let the games begin! Kev
    23 points
  34. Dandiego

    Vigilante

    Ok, progress continues. Here are the intakes dry fitted to the fuselage box. I am not 100% sure that I have the intakes correct. I am now printing the section of the fuselage that goes between the intakes. That should give me a better idea if the intakes are shaped correctly. I am however pleased with the fit between the intakes and the fuselage box. Later, Dan
    23 points
  35. So this is absolutely a new way for me to start building a model . Instead of clipping parts off the sprue of the kit I start at the computer using Fusion 360 building 3D parts . So far this is what I have done a lot of what I have picked up is from YouTube and with some support from a few of you on here .
    23 points
  36. Time for an update as it's been a while - life and work and everything else has been getting in the way and keeping me away from the bench. However for a change in pace and a break from working on the main airframe, I've began to work on the props. I once again have raided my stash of Beaufighter parts as the props are the same size and turn the same way. I've had to shorten the hubs a little to take the spinners which have come from the spares box (no idea what the were from) and made some new shafts from sprue to fit the modified engines: These will now need a squirt of paint and will be good to go. It's half term next week so I am hoping to get going again in earnest with this! All the best, Tom
    23 points
  37. Looks like we have our theme for today. Pics as promised........... All I can say is if I had done any research prior to just jumping in and buying a Master Model M-61 I would have easily found that it wasn't an M-61 in the chin but an M134 instead, which is about 1/2 as big around. I just jumped in not even thinking how small it really was. All I had to do was pull out the front 6 holed disk from the M-61 MM kit and compared it to the chin mounted M134 from the OOB Cobra kit and I could have saved myself 4 or 5 hours of complete hell. It really isn't even close, and I should have at least looked up what I was trying to replicate and would have found no such weapon in Master Models catalog. As I said, it isnt even close and I really should have paid more attention to what I was buying. Here you can see the partially assembled M-61 next to the hole for the M134. Of course this was after a full night of frustration. I had already cut the gun barrels down to fit within the chin turret, but failed to take into account the diameter of the gun: Well lesson learned. Since there is no brass version of the M134 (yet), Im hoping Master Model comes to the rescue with a complete brass kit for the chin of the AH-1G . However, I cant even begin to fathom how frustrating one could be to assemble with the problems I had with the much larger M-61. I would think they may have to somehow make a different assembly style for it to be even remotely possible to get right. With that frustration set in, I decided to get onto something else that I could successfully complete on the model. I installed a few small rare earth magnets to a plastic tube, and glued it into the tail of the Cobra with a long dowl attached so I could make sure that it got glued in straight. After that dried and with the magnets buried in the tail, I got a small stainless steel tube and cut it down to length and added a few more of the same magnets to that: Then easy peasy, the tail rotor attaches and spins freely, while still being able to be removed if necessary After that was completed I moved on to tarting up the pilots gun sight. This is the much earlier XM-69 reflex sight used in Cobras................. No, of course its not, there's no such thing. Its just the OOB gun sight with a bunch of PE, watch parts, wire, 3D printed knobs, micro-tubing, and some clear Squadron plastic sheet cut into gun sight "glass". Sorry for the crap pics, it was a hard lil booger to photograph. I know its complete fiction, but again, with limited parts and a desire for some fun I just went for something that looked cool and busy. Im heading back to the build tonight to get a dash of paint on the gun sight and some Future on the sight glass. Cheers!
    23 points
  38. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    thanks more small things done. Still not ready about 10 parts to go After that its time to start the nose wheel bay Mark
    23 points
  39. Hi gents, it took me a while, but here is some progress. The main reason that I couldn't post anything earlier is that I did a lot of research on the wing panels. I now believe, that I have fairly correct drawings of the wings. The second reason is, that I had to sand down the primer. It turned out, that the glue I use to glue the aluminium panels to the structure reacted with the primer. It made a royal mess and it didn't cure. So I had to rip off the first panels I had glued on (of course, they where unusable after that) and I had to sand the complete wing surfaces. A lot of fun ... Anyway, here are some photos. Note, that the wing panels of the Viggen where not riveted to the structure but screwed on (the exeption beeing the rear leading edge panel). I used a 0.6 mm beading tool to represent the fasteners as compared to 0.4 mm for rivets. Upper side. I installed only the leding edge panels so far (the aft one is not yet glued on because I fear, that I will damage it) I'll leave the upper side like this untill I have installed the MLG side walls. Lower side with some of the panel glued on. And another view. And some more skin panels and access covers. Skin panels and access covers in place. And another view. And some more panels and access covers. They are not completely flat, but once they are glued on they will be fine. These panels are not glued on yet because they protrude over the rear edge of the structure and I'm sure I will damage them while installing the MLG bay bits and pieces. A detail of the MLG bay. The fasteners seem very large and deep. But that is an optical illusion due to the reflections on the aluminium. And the panels will be sanded down a bit to insure, that they are flush. And what's more, my painting is usually a bit heavy handed, so I'm certain, that after painting they will be unobtrusive enough, like in the next pic of a paint mule: And this panel hasn't even been sanded ... That's it for today. Next up are the MLG side walls and the the skins for the upper surfaces. I know, it's way too early to decide on the loadout of my Viggen but I have made up my mind to hang a U95 Jamming Pod under the right wing. I have made a preliminary drawing, however I'm not sure about the dimensions. I found some dimensions on a somewhat obscure website (length: 3140 mm, diameter 494 mm). However, in the drawing I made using this dimensions the pod looks a bit too fat. What say you? If anybody could point me to more information on the U95 pod I would be very grateful. As always, thanks for looking. Cheers Rainer
    23 points
  40. Still trying to cure my current carrier deck diorama addiction, I initially wanted to have a wing folded Hawkeye waiting behind raised JBD of the F-14 on the CAT2. But that idea got scrapped the moment I stumbled upon this picture: The feathered engine, the compressed oleo and deflected rudders sold me instantly. The kinetic E-2C isn't the best kit around but it's the only Hawkeye in 1/48. It was built with Eduard photoetch, SAC gears, MasterCaster wheels and homemade decals and masks for VAW-115 Liberty 601. A 4mm brushless engine was added in the right nacelle to further emphasize the left feathered prop. The right oleo was extended to give that specific angle of the wings and the double rudders (only 3 of the vertical surface have rudders, but double hinged) were deflected accordingly. The carrier deck was done in the same way as the previous one, cut from my real size 1/48 carrier deck photoshop template to display the Hawkeye just before snatching the arresting wire. Wings and Rotodome are not glued they slide in place to ease up transport and storage. The WIP is on my blog Thanks for looking
    22 points
  41. mark31

    JA37 Viggen

    so here we are with a small update i haddend much time this week to build. The wife in the hospital for surgery on the knee and just back home. So what happend on this one the wings are on and for size its a A3 cutting mat the fit off the wings need work so already put some putty on and start sanding. Still needs more work lik scribbing but first im going to put some primer on to see where it needs more work Only didt sanding an putty on the top side so far a vieuw on the underside Im planning to use some evergreen to fill the big gaps and some putty. I didt my best to get the fit so good i can get but this area whas a no go beter Thats it for now. Im hoping to have a bit more bench time but will see how things go here at home Mark
    22 points
  42. Finito! The Akron Canton IPMS club has a nose-art theme coming up this winter and I was psyched to find something to use! I've had this P-38 in my stash since the Chattanooga Nats and this was the perfect reason to pull it out. I found the Exito decals for Beautiful Lass and it was all the extra graphics they provide that sold me on purchasing them.A little on the aircraft and pilot - The plane was built by Lockheed in Burbank and shipped overseas disassembled and then reassembled. Lt. John O'Neill piloted Beautiful Lass from March to November 1943 on missions over Rabaul and New Guinea, claiming eight aerial victories during this period. The aircraft was lost on December 28 1943 when pilot Lt. Ormond Powell encountered foul weather and was declared MIA when he failed to return to base. 5 coats of gloss clear, then rolled some 4000 grit paper on a dowel to sand down the edge of the decal all around to make sure it was perfectly smooth and you couldn't feel the lip from the decal (they are just a tad thick). Then I applied 2 coats of flat clear. By the time it dried the decal edge had totally disappeared. Super happy with this because it was so obvious to start with. I preshaded in a lightened olive drab (used yellow zinc chromate) and then edged it all in black mist to get the varnish effect from the taped seams to show clearly. I modified a brush so it had just a few bristles and did the panel lines in aluminium. Tamiya leaves this center section smooth but the pics show lots of wear so this seemed to create the right affect. I did the exhaust staining with rendered oils. I used ochra, burnt sienna, and raw umber added some oil stains down under as well And a final closing shot. I'm pretty darn happy with this I still have some work to do on my assembly methods. Fortunately a little chipping goes a long way to hiding that haha
    22 points
  43. Black is down! This is, MRPs "Black" MPR-005 (their basic black), its not their Super Gloss Black at all, but boy did it sure turn out glossy anyway! I did not intend or need it to be this glossy, but it sure did bring out any flaws, which I subsequently fixed, filled and re-shot. Only the areas on the fuselage and around the cockpit that will be black in the end was shot with MPR-005, the rest was left in black primer. All the previous surface prep was worth it. With very little color/finish sanding the surface should be gtg. I must say, the MRP-005 shot like an absolute DREAM and dried to a super stout finish. However, you really need to have your "S" together before you shoot it, cause it shows EVERYTHING. This surface is still far from perfect, but will look 20 times better once color sanded and with some flat over it. Only the rear most underside panel with the tail skid slot in it, and one flat panel behind the skids are painted black on the underside Ive got the main rotor blades and tail rotor in the paint booth atm, so while this hardens off, I will work on those. Cheers and thanks for stopping in on me.
    22 points
  44. 22 points
  45. my last built , enjoy :
    22 points
  46. When last I left things it was a bit of a nail biting moment, to see if the skids stayed level and flat as I had left them........... Success! Not perfect by any means, but Ill take it, as this build is all about fun, and doing something different. Next up was a fairly scary part, the glass! I don't have a perfect track record on clear parts, so its always a crap shoot. In this case it helped that the fit of the clear parts was REALLY excellent. AAMOF, I could set the two side panels on without any glue what-so-ever and they not only stayed in place, but there were really no gaps. I have deviated from the ICM instructions on many parts of this build, simply based on instinct and the canopy parts were no different. I decided that the two immobile canopy pieces on the gunners starboard and pilots port were more important to get to fit right, VS the main overhead canopy glass as it had a much less positive attachment point, and had more wiggle room for adjustment if it was left for last. So that is exactly what I did: The fit of these parts was about as good as you could have ever asked for OOB: And now with the center canopy section added and glued in. No filler required anywhere around the canopy parts; Again, very nice fit here with little effort: More.........
    22 points
  47. The skinning continues. If I could I would spend 24 hours a day doing this. The more you do, the more you want to do! Got a few more panels on. I've been annealing these ones so far as it definitely helps the panels conform to the circular shape of the fuselage as I can't roll them out too hard once the rivets are on or they'll get ruined. I do spend a fair amount of time burnishing down around the rivets with a small wooden stick, but it does help. I also sometimes have to add a little superglue on the edges of the panels, especially where they overlap with the previous one. All in all, going well so far, although these are pretty easy ones to do truth be told.... The steps for each panel are as follows: Masking tape template to find rivet lines and panel dimensions. Place another piece of tape on the other side of a piece of clear acrylic and trace the panel to make the reverse shape. Take that piece of tape and stick it on the reverse side of the litho plate (the blue coloured side) Run all the rivet lines using a rivet wheel as much as possible Cut out the panel shape Deepen each rivet hole with a beading tool. Flip the piece over and push the surrounds of each rivet down to make the rivets stand out (yes so each rivet gets done 3 times) Anneal, flatten out (riveting causes a lot of deformities) and attach using contact cement Burnish panel down carefully around rivets Scrub with steel wool....... The "double row" of rivets on the rear fuselage panels has a very interesting pattern. I've been looking at reference photos of this including the Swoose. Amusingly, it looks like a lot of them weren't staggered like you'd normally expect.... In the case above you can see that every second one is simply doubled up. I guess they were still learning what worked and what didn't back then! Doesn't mean that every panel is like this, but I did notice it around the rear panels especially...... It'll be much more of the same for a while, so I'll be back when I've got a bit more of the fuselage covered Cheers, Craig
    22 points
  48. Tad bit of progress to report. The fix is coming along well so far. Prior to any priming or finish sanding, I cut the carbon fiber rods down to roughly 1/2" or less and inserted them to see if things would hold together without any adhesives. Success! (to a point) Things only being held in place by friction However, we do have 1 slight issue This is one of the few disadvantages of using carbon fiber VS steel, and that is the fact that you get nearly 0 flexibility. This definitely came into play here, as I likely have one of the rods a teensy bit off and it has created this difference in angle between the two skids. However, because of the stiffness of the CF rods, I would have to warp the skid arms themselves to correct it. My plan to correct this is to have the front tube remain, and separate the rear tube so that the angle of the tube in the plastic can be adjusted so the skids set flat. Or at least that is my plan. After I figured out I need to separate one of the tubes, I proceeded on with cutting and smoothing one tube, then masked off the carbon fiber rods with some Tamiya tape and set about finish sanding them. After getting them acceptably smooth I shot some Tamiya fine white primer on them to alert me to the presence of any flubs, bumps or ripples in the JB Weld. It was prime, dry, sand, smooth, clean, rinse & repeat. That went on for quite a few rounds. I used Tamiya fine white so that it might be easier to see mistakes, but in the end I will be using a black base of Mr Surfacer 1500. In the end I think this will all work out fine if I can just get the skids to line up I'm hoping I can get them adjusted flat, then it will only be a matter of gluing them in. Next up I will attempt to get the clear parts in order as well as the the associated Quinta Studios parts left that go on said clear parts. Cheers!
    22 points
  49. hi all, thank you for you positive comments, albeit I feel myself a little bit unmotivated on this project, may be I'm just get loosing grip on it, approaching the diorama's phase... I choosed to do some light weathering on separate parts, and to build up the wing's strutctures on these before try to match these with the fuselage, adding in the process the last details, like landing light, mooring rings, air tubes for the foldable (yes, really!) pitot, fuel televel. on this session I added also vacu formed navigation lights covers, being the latter done with a scalded fishing line colored (speaking of the left one, the right was cologreen, ah ah). same for the landing light. I was concerned about the solidity of all these struts, but indeed all seemed to go straight on place. other details were the air scoop for the electric generator on the engine's RH and finally I added the exhausts, to wich ones I cutted the four front slots last item to go, the landing gear's brake lines and here we are, at last. I'll add doors and other little items when I'll be ready to glue it permanently on the base. with a slight modification on the lower cowling's exaust holes, I rendered the engine fully accessible. with the option to leave it without the lateral panels, as seen on many WWII images. but, being the idea to do a late autumn diorama, I think these will go installed, albeit with magnetos. well, after a glue hardening night, she seems to be sound and stable, really nice kit! really, I would like to know the designer of such intricate but efficient structure! what else? the kid that still lives in me ask for an engine run up... so, clear prop! next step, diorama base, stay tuned! cheers, Paolo
    22 points
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