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  1. Evening all, I took advantage of my time away from the classroom last week and finally finished this two-and-a-bit year project: Tigger Models' (the old ID Models' vac kit) of the Short Sunderland in 1/32nd scale. This has been a really rewarding project, and despite a setback when I knocked the completed fuselage with its interior off the table, making a rather messy contact with the kitchen floor, it's been great fun and relatively straightforward - despite its size. Kits like this come as a blank canvass for the builder to work his/her magic - 'bumps in plastic' is quite apt, but the shapes are reasonably accurate if not a bit primitive (picture borrowed from Tigger's webpage): The kit provides a the correct hull shape for a MkI or MkII, but with some mods the more adventurous builder could easily convert it to a MkIII/V, etc. All panel lines and surface details need to be added and the parts are devoid of any real detail, but the plastic is lovely to work with and scribes/sands beautifully. Due to the size of the parts, home-made interior bulkheads are needed, and any visible parts of the interior need to be made from scratch: Strong wing spars are also essential to keep the structure of the model sound - thick plastic card spars were made and added: The flightdeck interior, bomb room and nose section were all made from scratch and detailed with some aftermarket seatbelts: All the aerials were made from sprue and thin wire - markings were mix of home-made masks and decals: The engines were made from spare HK Models' B-17 cylinders coupled with Revell Beaufighter parts to make a reasonable representation of the Bristol Pegasus. The early-style exhausts were made from Evergreen tube bent slowly over the toaster! Landing lights were home made from some of my daughter's diamante play/craft jewellery (for the lights) and the covers were clear acetate once again heated over the toaster. Rigging for the floats came for EasyLine and reminded me why I'll never build a biplane! The kit's transparencies were used throughout - all turret interiors were scratch built. Beaching gear was also made from scratch with a friend helping out with some 3D printed wheels: Bomb racks were again made from scratch with some rather lovely depth charges coming from Tim Perry - thanks, Tim! I used Xtracolor enamels throughout the build - 6 tins were used in total! I don't like to go too mad with weathering on my models so kept it relatively clean - however you can't build a Sunderland without the distinctive water marks on the hull: A bit of exhaust staining and some fading with post-shading completed the upper surfaces: And for some generic pictures: I'm often asked how big a 1/32nd Sunderland is. I'm sorry to inflict my ugly mug on you but you can see that it is a massive model with yours truly holding it! My model represents a Sunderland MkII of 201 Squadron during 1942 in the lovely temperate sea scheme. Painting white gives me nightmares (especially something of this size) so I took the easier option. W4001 (ZM-V) was only on strength between February to October 1942, before hitting an underwater rock and being written off, thankfully with no loss of life. Thanks for those who took an interest along the way - I'm off for a long lay down in a darkened room to contemplate the next project! Best wishes to all, Tom
    74 points
  2. Hi All This is the 1/32 Trumpeter MiG-29C built as a Ukrainian Air Force MiG-29S (9-13). It is loaded for a CAS mission inspired by a photograph I found online. It is impossible not to feel the impact of a war in Europe, in what feels like my own backyard - and like so many on these forums I also felt the urge to show my support. I tried to incorporate as much aftermarket stuff produced in Ukraine as I could. The Rocket Pods and Wheels are from ResKit. The paint masks are both from Foxbot and DN Models. The seat is from Quickboost and the pitot tube to replace the telegraph pole included in the kit is from Master. The exhausts are from Zacto model. The decals are a story of their own - I screwed up the first paintjob using the Foxbot masks I already had so I had to start over While waiting for the brand new released masking set to arrive from DN Models, Foxbot also announced a brand new set of decals for a digital camo MiG-29. I wrote Oleg from Foxbot if I could somehow get a set and he happily sent me one straight from Kyiv in the middle of an active warzone. That kinda makes this model special for me.. I painted the model entirely using paints from MRP - the second time also in the right order . Below in order from Dark to Light: MRP-034 Tank Grey (MRP-405 seems to be too light for the MiG-29) MRP-403 Grey MRP-402 Light Grey MRP-246 Light Arctic Grey The underside is painted with MRP 405 Blue Grey Hope you like it Niels Click the images and they will open in a larger version
    55 points
  3. Plm

    Jetmads /32 JA37 VIGGEN

    Hello, Second kit of the year after the HPH Helldiver, once more a resin kit. Lot of sanding but that's modelling. Hope you like it.
    42 points
  4. My rendition of Major Edward Giller's "The Millie G" is now complete. This was by far my most involved project with extra detailing for the engine, cockpit, landing gear bays and the MG bays. Here's a link to the build thread in the Works in Progress section: https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/92956-132-tamiya-p-51d-15-na-mustang-the-millie-g/ Thanks for all the comments and suggestions during the build. In summary, here were the aftermarket additions to the kit: Barracuda cockpit upgrade Barracuda instrument panel Barracuda cockpit sidewalls HGW seatbelts Eduard guy bay kit (late) Barracuda P-51D tires Eduard P-51 exterior detail kit Barracuda decals + placards Eduard canopy masks Eduard engine detail kit The main paints used were Mr. Color lacquers. Now for the final photos. All of the main markings were painted except the stars and bars and tactical lettering, which were decals. The stencils from the Barracuda decals were used instead of the kit stencils. The ailerons and elevators were glued in place. The rudder and flaps are movable and do a pretty good job of staying in place. The Eduard gun bay doors is an excellent upgrade over the kit doors. The ammo belts are from the Tamiya kit. The engine covers are all removable and fit reasonably well with Tamiya's magnet system. The starboard panel just under the exhaust is a little fiddly. The weathering was a combination of oils, airbrushed Tamiya acrylics (heavily thinned) used for local effects and with sponge chipping and spatter templates. Colored pencils and pastels were also used for various effects. Mr. Color GX100 was used for gloss coats and GX114 for flat coats. Great stuff. I used Mr. Color C330 RAF Dark Green for the fuselage. And a slightly darker version for the nose checks and spinner green. The NMF paints are Mr. Color Super Metallics. The checks on the nose were painted. The drop tank fuel and pressure lines were created from 0.5mm wire. I kept the weathering on the drop tanks relatively light since often they were single use items. All of the fastener holes in the engine panel frames were drilled out. Light colored oils were used on the NMF surfaces to depict varying amounts of oxidation on the panels. Eduard's engine upgrade contains PE hose clamps for all of the main hoses and piping in the engine. They are a pain to attach and paint but look pretty snappy when complete. Also, the edges of the gunsight glass were painted Tamiya clear green to simulate the look of the thick glass plate. The aluminum paint on the wings was rendered with a combination of the Mr. Color Silver and light gray. Mr. Surfacer was used to fill the rivets and panel lines on the forward 40% of the wings. Grime and wear was depicted using a combination of Tamiya acrylics, oil paints and colored pencils. Some wear is down to the primer and some is down to the base metal. The primer toward the back of the wing is ZCY and the primer toward the front is dark gray putty colored, based on the construction process. The Eduard gun bay doors really add a lot compared to the kit doors. The Eduard doors come with a hinge at the bottom of the door for gluing it permanently in place. I wanted to be able to remove them, so I made tabs similar to the kit doors and glued them onto the Eduard doors. I also added a support rod made out of 0.3mm wire. I really like the iconic 343 FS, 55th FG markings. Chipping around the panels and doors was done with acrylic paints and colored pencils. The cockpit detail from the Barracuda kit is quite good (details are on the build thread). One note was that I changed the wiring from the radio box behind the pilot seat because the cable harness would interfere with the canopy support bracket. So I converted to a strand of speaker wire and painted it black. Thanks for following along! Comments and critiques are more than welcome. Thanks again.
    41 points
  5. 1/32 Tamiya model, Barracuda wheels, HGW wet transfers 232903, All colours MRP
    36 points
  6. I present to you the relatively new 32ari kit of italeri painted in the anniversary variant presented by RAF at Marham air base in 2019 but with extra the armament of the 6 brimstone, the one gbu-12 and the litening. I did use the following matterials: Decal:Xtra Decal 32070 Seat:Quickboost Wheels:Eduard P.E:Eduard Mask:Eduard Pitot:Master ASRAAM:Eduard Brimstone:Eduard Boz-107:Eduard Sky Shadow"Eduard I hope you like it! Comments and remarks welcome !!!
    35 points
  7. MikeMaben

    Me109D

    A combination of Dragon's E-3 and Cutting Edge D-1 conversion. A long and frustrating journey involving eye surgery and a nasty case of excema on the back of my hands, it's finally finished. I was shooting for a newly constructed pre-war a/c recently delivered to a field for (secret) combat training. I just went with whatever struck my fancy but tried to keep it within the confines of what existed at that time (late '38 early '39). Critique welcome ... onward and upward. WIPlink
    35 points
  8. Hello all; As many of you know, my beloved husband and life's partner Jerry Crandall passed away due to Covid-19 on 12 June 2022, only 4 days after diagnosis. He begged to come home and not die in the hospital so I worked with Hospice to bring him home on Saturday. He was so happy to be home. The Hospice RN gave us pain management and oxygen. He was home at 4:30 Saturday afternoon and passed at 2:50 on Sunday a.m. He is now with the Lord. I will continue Eagle Editions, we have several project in the pipeline. We have EagleCals and Wings of the Black Cross projects lined up. Thinking about phasing out some of our resins as they are becoming too expensive to cast. We started our business in 1974 with western art and prints, expanded into books and hobby decals/resins in 1997 and plan to continue forward. Thanks for your support in the past and we look forward to working with you in the future. We have a selection of Bf 109 G-14 and G-6 decals available for the new ZM kit. I'll be sending out a mailer this week. And don't forget our 1:24 Spitfire EagleCals that are just around the corner!!!! Happy modelling, Judy
    34 points
  9. Hello LSP community! I just wrapped up the Tempest build and also have a Fw190D-9 build in its beginning stages. But having worked on the D-9 kit so many times in the past, I have an itch to get my hands on some new plastic so I'm going to start something new. This is the Hasegawa 1/32 Ki-61-1 Hei model kit. The Ki-61 was Japan's only operational fighter aircraft in WW2 to utilize a liquid-cooled inline engine. Many have compared it to the Bf109 since the engine utilized was a license-built Daimler Benz DB 601 but the Hien was an independent design by Kawasaki. The model kit is a typical modern Hasegawa large scale release... maybe not as much internal detail and frills compared to Zoukei Mura and Tamiya but nicely done nonetheless. I've got a relatively small amount of aftermarket stuff that I'm going to include with this build that I will get into more detail later. The kit is molded in typical Hasegawa fashion... very fine details in neutral grey plastic. The exterior features finely recessed panel lines and delicate rivets along the panel lines. Because of the latter, I am thinking of NOT adding any additional rivet detail on this build. This kit is comprised of five sprues of grey parts and one clear. In typical Hasegawa fashion, all of the grey trees are encased in a single bag so a careful check of scuffing and/or broken parts is recommended. Surprisingly, the simple rendition of the main tire has a flat spot and subtle bulge to portray a pneumatic tire under a weight load. It is very rare to see a weighted tire in a mainstream kit. The molding quality is excellent and again, breaking tradition from most other manufacturers, Hasegawa elects to offer a pilot figure. I can't paint figures for beans so this feature will not be utilized but I can't help but admire the nice molding of the pilot. Although I am a fan of most of Hasegawa's choices, I do not like how they represent the instrument panel. While impressively detailed, I don't think you can get a good result trying to paint the individual gauge markings. And the raised detail will only distort the supplied instrument panel decal. It would be much better, in my opinion, to provide smooth circular instrument bezels so that the decals can lay flat. It's a shame that Hasegawa does not appear to be producing any new 1/32 aircraft models. I rather like Hasegawa's approach of not offering unnecessary and unseen details that can get in the way of overall fit. The wing assembly is somewhat unique in that the wing bottoms are separated just like the wing tops, which means, from a practical perspective, more glue seams to deal with. Hasegawa took a similar approach with the Bf109 kits and I didn't have any significant fit issues with their Bf109 K-4. The wheel wells are molded integrally into the wing bottom parts and look a bit simplistic without any opportunity to add details like wiring. If this is how the real wheel wells look, that is a good thing! The clear parts include two sets of canopies, one to pose open and one to pose closed. I typically avoid using the decals from Hasegawa and Tamiya kits. From a color and resolution perspective, they look good but I've found decal material to be noticeably thicker than from other decal makers such as Eagle Editions and Cartograph. The hinomarus and major markings will be painted using custom cut masks. I also have a set of Ki-61 decals by Wolfpack (printed by Cartograf) that I can utilize for the data stencils. The kit-supplied cockpit looks to be fairly well populated with 20+ parts but I opted to include the Aires resin cockpit for this build since I felt the instrument panel, at a minimum, needed to be replaced. The Aires set comes with a fret of photoetched details including an instrument panel face that will utilize a printed sheet of acetate for the dial details. I think this method yields excellent results although I wish Aires would've included some separate instrument bezels to "stack" on the panel to give the panel more 3-D relief. I know that Aires often carries a negative reputation of their parts not fitting but I've had mostly positive experiences with Aires stuff. From a detail perspective, they are excellent, especially if you compare the wiring detail to resin sets from Eagle Editions or MDC. The other major aftermarket item that I'm adding is this resin nose by Wolf Pack. The Hasegawa kit represents the earliest variant of the Hien (Hei), with 12.7 Ho-103 cannons above the engine. The Tei variant upgraded those guns to 20mm Ho-5 cannon and required a lengthening of the nose. This resin upgrade offers the lengthened nose as well as some other bits that differentiated the Tei from the Hei. Next, I'll jump into Wolfpack set in more detail.
    33 points
  10. My Corsair Number 15. 1/32 Tamiya model, Barracuda wheels, Quinta studio 3D cockpit decals, HGW wet transfers 232903, All colours MRP.
    33 points
  11. The following photos are of my recently completed build of the 1/32 Special Hobby Hawker Tempest Mk. V "Hi-Tech2" kit. This edition includes a bunch of resin and photoetch enhancements, most notably a very detailed resin depiction of the Napier Sabre engine. I also added the Eduard photoetch brass flaps and used HGW dry transfer for the data stencils. All of the other markings were painted using custom cut masks. The aircraft depicted is JJ+F flown by David C. Fairbanks, an American credited with 15 kills, 14 of which were flying the Tempest. The complete build can be found at:
    32 points
  12. Here is my finished Lightning F2a XN776 (Charlie) serving with 19 Squadron, RAF Gutersloh, posed pre-flight. The model is a 1/32 scale Trumpeter Lightning with extensive modifications. These modifications include stretching the fuselage by 5mm, correcting the profile and extending the length of the fuel tank, correcting the profile of the dorsal spine, correcting the ‘pinched’ area to the rear of the fuselage, correcting the stance by modifying the undercarriage, modifying the fuselage sides around the cockpit area and extending the canopy framing, scratch building an in-flight refuelling probe and modifying the fins on the fuel tank. There are numerous additions to the cockpit but you should be able to spot these in the photos. The modifications required considerable ‘surgery’ on the original kit and took me around two years to complete (on and off build!)
    31 points
  13. My recently completed Swordfish. Built pretty much out of the box but with some Eduard pe to augment the kit parts. I had great difficulty trying to use the kit's rigging and gave up in the end and resorted to using steel wire. I decided quite early into the build that I would display the model with the wings folded, primarily to save space.
    30 points
  14. Thanks Dennis! Jumping right into the Wolf Pack resin set, I'm going to start off to see how the exhausts fit. The resin nose is supposed to come with a a set of exhausts. I was missing the exhausts on mine and I contacted the seller and was able to get the exhausts shipped to me eventually. They are hollowed out on the ends to that tedious process can be avoided on this build. The exhausts were separated from their casting blocks. And then I noticed something... the parts were identical. They SHOULD be mirror images of each other since the openings into which they fit are also mirror images. Not the most positive way to start a build but... a fix shouldn't be too difficult. I built up the problem area with sheet styrene and CA glue. And then re-shaped with a sanding stick and sandpaper. Please note the last "corner" piece of sheet styrene that I had to add because I wrongly thought that corner was angled but was not! I applied a coat of Mr Primer Surfacer on the rebuilt area and checked the fit. This is the repaired side. This is the "good" side.
    30 points
  15. AIMS 1/32 Spitfire 1G conversion with Barracuda details update Hi everyone enjoyed doing a little plumbing but now I am near blind. A little more wiring to add still but I am not looking for perfection - just enjoying making this budget model into as nice a Spitfire as possible. once what I have done has been painted I can attach the dashboard frame to the right sidewall and plumb in the Barracuda undercarriage control. Please note that I had to remove my pilot's head armour and make the early style set up. I might be wrong but I do not think you can fill up the 29 gal tank with such armour in place and as I had no photo of a PR IV with the head armour and the only clear photo of the PR 1G head location in the Ventura publication also showing it without the armour I went ahead and removed mine and fixed the resulting chaos as well as making the lightening holes etc. Hope you like J
    29 points
  16. I can see the finish line coming up soon on this one! With the salt weathering stage done, I felt safe about removing most of the masks, including the clear windscreen. No major surprises but there was a fair amount of dust collecting on the interior side of the windscreen that I'll have to clean off. The masks from the sliding canopy were removed with no issues. It stays in place without glue and can be posed either open or closed but it tends to pop out from the rails if you play with it too much. The resin wheels are now glued into place. 2-part JB Kwik Weld epoxy was used to give me time to position the flat spots correctly. After ten minutes, the epoxy has cured enough to place the Tempest upright on her own feet. Stance check... The tail gear and doors have been glued into place. The tail wheel still rotates freely so the flat spot can rotate to the correct orientation after the main wheels are glued into place and the stance of the aircraft finalized. Only the inner flaps will be glued into place. The outer flaps can be held in place by friction and it will be easier to secure the wings without the outer flaps when it is time to transport the model. She's just about done with only a few more things to add.
    29 points
  17. Thanks Zac! Ok.. so the cockpit is pretty much complete now that I've made those last revisions. But I alluded to the resin nose, which still has not been fitted yet. It probably would've been smarter to have addressed the surgery required to fit the resin nose at the beginning before doing all of the cockpit painting. But sometimes we get lucky with the order and, now, looking back in hindsight, I think I dodged a few bullets. Here is the Wolfpack resin nose to convert the Hien from a Hei to a Tei. It's slightly longer than the kit nose but not as long as Ki-61 II nose, which I think is the sleekest of all Hiens. Not having made any decision regarding riveting, it has not been worked on except to smooth out the mold joint along the bottom. I decided to attack the cutting of the kit fuselage in several stages instead of trying get the stair-step cuts in one try. The first one would go completely through the fuselage, well away from the final edge so I opted to use the big blade. The ultimate cut line is marked in pencil and the big blade cut so nicely, I continued to use it. I've still left some wriggle room between the cut edge and the ultimate edge and that will be taken care of by careful sanding. The initial test fit of the resin nose was very positive. Looks great! The cockpit is re-inserted back into the fuselage for the next test fit. Looks like trouble. That extended deck in front is NOT going to fit! You can see here the mistake I made in not test fitting the resin cockpit components with the resin nose much earlier. Compared to the kit part, the front deck forward of the bulkhead needs to be removed. It would've been quite simple prior to painting and assembly but now it becomes a very delicate operation. The guns are temporarily removed but the IP stays put because it is glued on solidly. Before re-mounting the guns, the four tabs on the side of the bulkhead were scraped off. Very lucky to have performed the removal without even knocking off one of the delicate reflector glass pieces! The cockpit now has a much better chance to fit. Crossing my fingers that the gun bodies will clear. Success! Even the canopy seems to fit ok!
    28 points
  18. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    Thanks chaps & good evening todays fun and games is making this... ..a couple of oleo struts for the gear - as is normally the case, there are a number of diameters and features to be allowed for. I started with drawings and was going to try to turn them on my mini lathe, but in the end opted for brass tube.. ..here the main legs have had one minor profile change put in them, there are some ali tube inserts to reduce the diameter to take the oleo strut and I cut a number of rings that are seen which also bracket a collar with the retracting struts.. ..also seen are the lower legs which were assembled from turned bits and include the axle & tie down ring... ...I later realised there are two kinds of torsion links & I had modelled the later one so the attachment bracket was remade.. ..the rings were glued square on the tube by using another telescopic bit of tube to level them, plus the ali tube insert has been fitted.. ..the early torsion links were made using my proxxon mini mill and grinding to shape - they still need some casting features adding. The strut is stainess steel rod.. ..the close up doesn't do my lathe skills any favours but this is the lower leg & axle which is quite a complicated little assembly with many shapes - unfortunately solder over ran into some of the edges, but it is what it is.. ..the kit of parts.. ..and a completed strut dry fitted so all the bolts & assembly are loose so it can be disassembled for painting.. ..times two... ..and they will sit on a brass spigot & mounting plate that makes the correct rake and inward cant to allow for dihedral - there is no leg wheel well to speak of, the legs have a complex gear assembly to twist them that sits on the wing surface - still got all that to make... ..thats it for a while - off to Tuscany tomorrow (if my flight is not cancelled..) to give away my daughter at her wedding on Friday TTFN Peter
    28 points
  19. Got the dark brown splinter shade on, for the most part: Vertical stabs are just dry-fitted: Note tight wing/glove seal on pic below... that took a lot of work. I think it's possible to build an excellent Tomcat with the Tamiya kit, but you'll have to invest a huge amount of time in basic model building to get you there. Cheers, Marcel
    28 points
  20. Here is my Kitty hawk 1/35 SH-60B much of the interior has been done with fusion 360 and 3D printed and of course the same with the exterior. The wheels and rotor head and tail rotor came from Reskit. The markings came from the kit I did create a mask set and was able to paint on most of them.
    27 points
  21. Thanks Kevin! Thanks Matt! I does make it look more like a purposeful machine. Now I have to work up the motivation to rivet the rest of the aircraft! Thanks for checking in Dennis! Appreciate it! Thanks Chris! Thank you Alex! Thank you! Thanks Peter... almost embarrassed to have you step into my humble build! Thank you so much for the comment! After fixing and riveting the nose, I decided to thin the edge of the baffles above the exhausts. Ignore the elongated shapes of the rivets... that's just the result of the sanding process. Time to start closing up the cockpit. In order to orient the oxygen hose and mask, I have glued the starboard sidewall onto the cockpit floor first. The front and rear bulkheads were put into place temporarily as a fitting template for the sidewall. The oxygen hose has been roughly cut to length and posed to fit the mask, which will be placed on the right edge of the seat. I've added straps to the mask made of strips of aluminum foil and the mask was spot-glued to the right edge of the seat. The rear bulkhead with the seat was then glued into place onto the cockpit floor. It took some wriggling to get the oxygen hose connected to the mask. Once that was done, I glued the front bulkhead/instrument panel into place. The Aires cockpit fits very well together with consistent contact around all of the edges. I simply held each part in place with my fingers and seeped thin CA glue into the joints. The port sidewall is glued in last. The cockpit is complete! Now I want to check the fit of the resin cockpit into the fuselage. I can now confirm that the Aires resin cockpit for this kit is a drop-in fit without any need for adjustments to the fuselage parts. The forward gun deck of the resin cockpit DOES need to be removed in order for it to work with the Wolfpack resin Tei nose. The Wolfpack resin nose is then slipped into place, again confirming the previous dry-fit assessments of a good fit. I have not decided whether to pose the canopy open or closed. Here is a check of the fit of the open canopy parts.
    27 points
  22. Marc, Nighthawk thank you guys for your comments! i appreciate it! now some more masking and painting.. Black RV band painted, also the code numbers , first the black 2 from montex masks, and then the yellow 1 on top.. next will be the vertical yellow bar and then i will move to the front cowling.. i have also re -painted both wingc camouflage as i wasn't thrilled with the previous result i am still learning .. thanks! S
    27 points
  23. One thing the F-4 was noted for was the absolutely filthy undersides. I started weathering this area previously but had to wait until I had all 200 or so decals in place before I could continue. Decals are now in place, so I went back to work with a few shades of Flory Washes, some AK Used Oil and good old thinned black enamel. Here's a good example of the real deal (although if I tried hard, I could find others that were even dirtier): Here is where I'm currently at. Pre-weathering picture of the outer wing. Got a bit of overspray to deal with on the leading edge areas but I'm pretty content with the way things turned out. That's it for now, thanks for checking in lads!
    27 points
  24. 1/32 Trumpeter A-6A INTRUDER “505 DEVIL LEADER” This is the trumpeter kit, and with all its faults, it somehow comes together pretty well. This build is from the “flight of the intruder film” and depicts 505 devil leader cool hand Luke and Cole Virgil Cole getting ready for a strike. The only addons I used are the Quinta studios cockpit detail, and the Readoak figures, it is painted with HATAKA acrylic paints. Instead of having the wings fully opened, or folded in the parking position, I decided to have the wings being unfolded, as no one builds them this way, it’s a simple bent metal tube that holds the wings in place. I used the AMMO night blue cement, as it shows where you have glued, great stuff, but if you use AMMO gloss varnish, it reactivates the blue in the glue and it all shows through where you have glued, so be careful, if you use this stuff. Enjoy Mike
    26 points
  25. I'm more than conscious that I have been somewhat absent from the forums recently but rest assured i have been building albeit at a very slow pace. Anyhow, my latest one off the production line, as it were is the Jetmads Viggen, built pretty much out of the box. I didn't post a work in progress thread as Aigore had that more than covered with his superlative build so I quietly carried on in the background. Not absolutely perfect but I think she will stand up to the 3 ft rule if you squint. She will be making an appearance at Telford all being well. The eagle eyed amongst you will have noticed the absence of the antenna immediately behind the cockpit which is now ready to go on together with the boarding ladder and exquisite tow bar. So there you go. A great kit all told but not without its issues. some of the 3d printed parts are extremely fragile but respond well to careful handling when removing them from the printing blocks. The main gear door supports are to long and as a result they foul the Skyflash missiles when they are in position. I deliberately left the sidewinders off as I personally don't like the bright green colour the Swedish airforce painted them so I went with just the Skyflash. I may add them in future although i'm not sure at the moment. The canopy is removable as Iv'e added a small magnet to keep it in place. I tried to do the same with the main tank but its just a little too heavy / magnets were too small. Feedback is more than welcome.
    26 points
  26. Finally there - just a couple of lights to add this evening. Hawker Hurricane Mk.1 YB-E, P3673, flown by Sgt (later Sqn Ldr) Desmond Fopp of 17 Squadron, summer 1940 - built for his grandson, who's a best buddy of mine and I've shared a fair few aviation adventures with... Build log here. Colours have gone a little squiffy in some images - don't have time to correct today. Have fun! Iain
    25 points
  27. Thank Kevin! One of the drawbacks to working on simultaneous projects, especially when they are in similar stages. I really should've done the nose surgery at the very beginning of the build but like you said, I luckily avoided the snookery. Thanks! Happy it worked out this time. Thanks Mark! Thanks Dennis! Hope to see your build soon! Thank you Lutz! No loss since the front deck serves no purpose on this build and would not be visible. Thanks Matt! Looks like the nose should fit without any major issues, which is a good thing. Yup! Happy and relieved to be able to move on! Thanks Mike! Thank you! Last time, I was able to confirm that the resin nose would fit onto the surgically altered fuselage pretty well. I spent some more time cleaning up the resin nose including tidying up this circular hatch and mismatched panel line on the bottom. After the adjustments were made, I sprayed the entire nose with Mr Primer Surfacer 1000. After some deliberation, I've decided to apply rivets onto this model. Using drawings from an older, Japanese-language publication, I sketched the rivet lines onto the resin nose with a soft (4B) leaded pencil. After the lines are sketched, a rotary rivet tool (Galaxy Tools) is used to puncture rows of small holes into the resin nose to simulate rivets. Unlike plastic, the riveting process on the primered resin does not create as big a mound of material around each hole but I still recommend sanding afterwards. After sanding, I applied a temporary pastel wash to highlight the riveting and other corrective work on the nose. Some of the nose bits like the spinner, the exhausts, the supercharger intake and gun barrels were added temporarily for these photos. I'm happy with the decision to rivet the Ki-61. I think the nose looks pretty bada$$ now.
    25 points
  28. Hello all, I managed to pick this kit up from a bootfair so i was expecting some issues with bit missing....and it turned out the most of the engine was missing, which wasnt a major drama but it would have been nice to be able to have this opened up. I used Tamiya paints for this one with MLT and they worked like a dream, then used Mr Colour varnishes to finish it off. It was straight out of the box with no additions. All comments are welcome but of note is there is no wire aerial attached due to travelling issues i.e. keep falling off :-)
    25 points
  29. Thanks for the comments guys! Using a rocket from an eggplane kit, I fashioned a pair of replacement bulges for the wing gun covers. Not an exact match but close enough! The bulges on the kit gun cover were sanded away. I cannot replicate the exact shape of the hand hole behind the bulge but I can do an oval hole by chain drilling. Here is what the modified kit gun covers look like. The previous post's photos didn't show it but the resin covers were not only too short but not wide enough. I think going this route will get me the best fit with the least amount of fill work. There is also a panel line on the upper wing that needs to be filled, which I've done with black CA glue. Time to remove the casting block from the resin nose. I used the big razor saw to get me to this point. It's always better to remove too little than too much. I scraped and sanded the excess. A quick check to make sure the spinner/backplate sit flush on the nose. There are some noticeable gaps and sloppy panel lines on the resin nose that I want to address before it is attached so I'm going to first fill the visible gaps with white Milliput.
    25 points
  30. Thanks guys! Great tips coming for the gun cover bulges. I've put it aside for now. I've jumped over to the Aires resin cockpit to check things out. The major pieces have been sawed from their casting bases. A comparison of the resin versus the kit plastic is not exactly fair since the plastic rendition has separate parts that have not been added. But what I find more striking than the differences are the similarities between the two. It's obvious that Aires has copied the major components of the Hasegawa cockpit in shape and fit. Even the backs of the resin sidewalls have the same locating pins as their plastic counterparts suggesting a drop-in fit, even though the instructions state that fuselage trimming is necessary. I taped the resin cockpit together. Fit is surprisingly good despite a lack of attachment pins. Here is the inside of the fuselage without any cutting or trimming. You can see the locating holes for the sidewalls. Surprise, surprise... even with the interference from the masking tape, the cockpit fits without any alterations to the fuselage. I was able to tape the fuselage sides together flush without any major pressure. Although it is very preliminary, I'm going to say that the Aires resin cockpit is a drop-in fit for the Hasegawa Ki-61 kit.
    25 points
  31. Took a look at the initial fit of the wings, flaps, and ailerons- pretty psyched- cheers P
    25 points
  32. Thanks guys! The manufacturer of the stand is JH Models and it was purchased from UMM-USA, which is a US hobby retailer. Not sure if they provide shipping to the UK. I did some salt weathering on top. An interesting technique that's hard (for me) to get right. The idea is to use salt crystals as a mask to create either paint chipping or spotty weather stains. I find it easiest to work with a flat finish so the salt weathering is usually the last painted effect that I will perform. Water is spread over the surface of the model and rock salt crystals are sprinkled on. Once it is dry, a very watered down contrasting color is misted over the model. In this case I used Tamiya Buff. After the buff is dry, I use a spray bottle of water and a clean cloth to remove the salt crystals and hopefully leave random spot stains. I want a very subtle effect but in this case, it is hardly noticeable. Which is better than overdoing it. I let the model sit for a couple of days. I had some other things to take care of but also wanted to give some time for any pesky residual pockets of salt to dry up and flare as white frost. I spattered some dark brown pastel wash on the bottom and wiped it off, leaving another layer of dirt on the bottom. Considering the weathering on the bottom complete, I removed some of the masking and started to install the landing gear legs. Checking the forward rake of the landing gear legs. As a rough visual reference, I want the bottom edge of the landing gear legs to be parallel to the alignment of the exhaust pipes on the fuselage. After I'm satisfied with the position of the landing gear legs, I glued into place all of the auxiliary struts and landing gear doors. The radiator exit flap was also attached at this time. The landing gear legs have been attached with Tamiya Extra Thin cement so I am want to let the glue cure completely before attaching the wheels but here's a sneak peak at the Tempest on her own legs. Here's a view of the port wing that shows the salt weathering effects a little better. I've worked a little bit more on the exhaust stains. Looking at the archive photo of this aircraft, I am guessing that the JJ+F codes were scrubbed clean of the exhaust stains and although I couldn't replicate the exact effect, I tried to show something similar on the port side. A similar but less severe effect was attempted on the starboard side.
    25 points
  33. I'm not doing very well with keeping this WIP going... but I am making good progress on the Cat, it's a huge amount of work but I happen to have a lot of time on my hands right now. Here's an overview of the underside: I made good use of the various Archer raised details, in this case the latches: Archer micro-welds used on the Tamiya external tanks: Before masking them, I did the carbon fibre engine shrouds by mixing Vallejo metallic colors with Tamiya acrylics and working with a screen to get the textured look... then a thick coat of satin varnish to get a plastic-like look (ignore the white dust particles): Here's what the top looks like now: Getting ahead with the dark brown splinter. Note "washed off" leading edges. Cheers, Marcel
    25 points
  34. Thanks Bill! I like to document the work that will be eventually hidden so I usually take a lot of photos of the cockpit. Thanks Andy! Appreciate you looking in! I've learned to live with the need to build up certain colors like yellow with multiple coats. It helps to have a good sable brush. Unlike the Fw190A, the Dora had an open wheel well that allowed part of the Jumo 213 engine to be visible. Hasegawa provides a partial representation of the engine. Assembled, it provides a reasonable representation of the bottom rear of the engine including some ducts and also the ammo cannisters for the MG131 cannon mounted above the engine. I am going to add some more wiring in this area. Not going for accuracy here but I want to make it more believably busy, if that makes sense. Notice that the chutes coming out of the ammo cannisters have solid ends. The Eduard exterior set that I have includes brass replacements for the chutes. In order to make use of these hollow chutes, the openings on the bottom of the wings need to be opened up first. The plastic chutes are cut off and the replacement brass chutes are glued into the interior side of the wing bottom piece. Before the next round of dry-fitting, I glued the backings for the exhausts into place. Here is what the engine area looks like with the brass ammo chutes added.
    24 points
  35. Here is the three-part instrument panel consisting of the photoetched face, the clear acetate with printed gauge details and the instrument panel backing in resin. The photoetch face and resin backing are painted in a very dark grey. Arguably, these should be black but I wanted a little bit of contrast on the instrument panel. The back of the acetate is sprayed white to bring out the instrument details. Here are the three painted components before assembly. The photoetch face has some details highlighted... black instrument faces and blue, yellow and red instrument rings on the bottom row. And here is the panel after it has been assembled. I attached the acetate to the photoetch face using Future. This was then attached to the resin backing using PVA card glue. I'm going into a slight holding pattern now as I'm waiting for some paints to arrive. Most modelers opt to paint the interior of the Ki-61 as a sandy brown but I am going use a grey-green (Mr Hobby Aqueous H-62 IJA Grey) instead upon the recommendation of Nick Millman, who runs the Aviation of Japan blog site and seems pretty knowledgeable.
    24 points
  36. Wing skinning - I felt (still do) that if I can get good aluminum skin panels on the forward gull wing portion of the wing, then the rest will be easier. And if it failed miserably, then I'd pull them off and do a plan "B" (currently undefined). These panels: Here is a shot from the Vulture's Row birdcage resto: Can you believe the amount of fastening???? So I started out on the LH wing. The challenges: 1. Match the contour with the adjacent LE intake panel (no step) 2. The severe compound curvature, especially the upper panel 3. Good butt join at the leading edge 4. Do not break off the gear strut or gear door One of the biggest excuses I had for not skinning the wings is the LE intake panel. It's impossible to skin, so I knew that adjacent aluminum skins would create a step around its periphery. Peter had suggested repeatedly to build up the edges of the intake panel using P-38 or the like. A good idea except not in my skill set. Instead I sought to sand and grind down the edges of the adjacent surfaces about .005 inch, to negate that step. That was very hard work, but that is what I did. So far so good - these two panels, and some others, will butt up against that LE intake panel. The compound curvature made it tough to get the panel periphery trims right. You cannot just lay down masking tape and trace the edges. The tape wrinkles, of course, when you lay it down on the wing, and makes the edges inaccurate when you flatten it out on a piece of aluminum sheet stock. Took two tries on the bottom panel, and one on the top panel, but just shear time and determination finally gave me good edges, including the very tricky curved butt join on the leading edge splice line. The other big excuse for not skinning the wing was possible damage to the landing gear and gear doors. Well I have decided to take that risk. The gear strut got nudged repeatedly, but held firm. The struts are pretty strong. The outboard gear door, on the other hand, has a nicely fractured forward gooseneck hinge, fractured right at the gooseneck. It is somewhat repairable, but will be a bit unsightly if you look for it. Oh well - that is a casualty that I knew would happen. It will be OK. I'm not going to fix it until I finish the wing skinning effort. OK, drum roll please...... I had to use annealed aluminum, which shows every possible imperfection of the underlying surface, including the adhesive. Also, for the upper panel, I was unable to create the fastener patterns on the flat panel on the bench (I use a glass pane for hardness), and had to do it on the wing. Once that wild contouring was done, no way was I going to flatten it back out to do the fasteners. That makes accuracy harder, and the depressions are a bit deeper because the underlying surface is not as hard. You be the judge, but I attempted to duplicate all those hundreds of fastener heads you see on the real thing. It's a little "lumpier" than I want; the only way to have improved that would have been to further thin down the adhesive before bonding down the panel. The shininess accentuates any imperfection; I am expecting a flat final top coat will make it look OK. I should have taken a picture of the upper panel at the point where I pushed it into that double-curved concave reverse gull wing shape. The middle just collapsed into an ugly bunch of wrinkles, worse than the "test panel" I tried last week. This modeler's hair caught on fire for a moment. But amazingly after lots and lots of burnishing with balsa sticks, it smoothed out. Same for the lower panel LE trim - it wrinkled badly at first, but it also burnished out. The leading edge butt splice took hours of trim/fit/trim/fit/trim fit. I am very happy with it though. This was pressure packed work, and took a few days to get through it - now I have to do it again on the RH wing. Next post I'll show the RH wing, plus a bunch of other panels. Not sure how far I will go - will I skin the flaps, will I tear off the flap doors underneath and redo using aluminum....all TBD at the moment. See ya' next time!
    24 points
  37. It's time for the flat coat! I use Model Master Acryl Clear Flat thinned with 90% iso alcohol. First I do the bottom... After the bottom is dry, I flip the model over and do the top. The separate engine cowlings have been painted and were taped together and placed in position to check the camo demarcations and exhaust stains. I wanted to see what the flaps looked like in place... I still have some weathering steps to perform before I can remove all of the masking.
    24 points
  38. The Australian Model Expo is a 3-day event normally held in Melbourne on the Queen's Birthday long weekend. This year, however, it got bumped back a week by a horse race (it's held at the Sandown Racecourse), and rescheduled from a Sat-Mon event to a Fri-Sun one. Thanks to the pandemic, the event was cancelled the previous two years, so this is the first time it has run since 2019. I attended yesterday, and despite also living in Melbourne, the venue is still a 90-minute drive from where I live - I could fly to Sydney in that time! It was great to catch up with friends and fellow modellers from around Australia, many of whom I hadn't seen in all that time. I'll be back on Sunday (tomorrow), but in the meantime, here are some photos of the LSP entries into the competition: And here was my own token entry into the show - non-LSP ironically! I also recorded a brief interview with Dave from the On the Bench podcast, but apparently he lost the audio file! Perhaps we can have another go when I'm back there tomorrow. Kev
    23 points
  39. It turns out that my right wrist and middle finger got a little worn out with all that awl pressing for hundreds of fastener heads. I do not want to risk carpal tunnel or some such thing and/or a blistered finger. Alot more skinning to do! So I decided to take a break from skinning for a week or so and do something else while my wrist and finger recover. Next post, I will report on more skinning. The next project after skinning is the engine cowls and cowl flap linkage. I don't know about you, but that is exciting to me. That engine front section has been sitting there for literally years waiting for me to do something with it (the aft section went into the now complete engine accessories compartment, as you know). Here is a shot from the engine cowl installation drawing from Aircorps Library: Note how the nose cowl and cowl flap ring attach to the engine cylinder heads. Originally I planned to start with the nose cowl. But I thought better of it and decided to instead start with the cowl flap ring. As shown, each engine cylinder intake and exhaust lobe has a flange or tab on it specially designed to accept support structure or linkage for cowlings and cowl flaps, regardless of which airplane. Here is a close-up of a typical attachment of the cowl flap ring to the engine cylinder head lobes for Corsair: You see a channel section cowl flap ring, with a cowl flap linkage fixed support fitting bolted to it - it slips into the inside of the channel. What you see is typical 18 places (two per aft cylinder). That cowl ring is also the aft support for the all important engine cowl panels, which have the all important skull & crossbones emblem. So VERY important that it be exactly located. So my challenge was to fit that thing onto the engine with good concentricity to the centerline of the engine, and accuracy fore/aft. To do that I made a fixture: The cowl ring was made from .1 inch wide Evergreen plastic channel section. I used the fixture to assure it is the right diameter. Then I place the ring on the raised portion of the fixture, and drop the engine down into it (the .75 inch hole in the middle fixes the location of the engine). Here: The idea of course is to have the engine and cowl flap ring properly oriented to one another, which the fixture does hopefully well, and then somehow insert and install 18 cowl flap linkage fixed fittings and their 4 each links. And that's the hard part. Here are some of the little tiny fixed fittings, 3D printed (18 total required): And here are the (ridiculously) small links (four per support): .09 inch long, .04 inch wide (and that is too large really), with cut-off .8 mm Meng nuts. 18 x 4 = 72 required. After getting three supports done, I was able to extract the assembly from the fixture, and the cowl ring stayed in place, although very flimsy: See the splice? As each support is built, using the fixture to assure proper location, the ring gets stouter and stouter. Here is what the supports look like up close and personal (four of them): So I have done 12 out of 18 supports so far: Tomorrow I will do some more - it is microscopic work with magnification goggles and readers. With all 18 supports, the ring will be very stout. It's fun to work on the engine again after all this time. Once I get the cowl flap ring completely secure, I will go back to wing skinning. Stay tuned!
    23 points
  40. Thank you Mark! I appreciate the comments, as always! Thank you very much! Thanks Troy! Finally got some fishing dates for July!!! Thanks Lutz! That detail is about to get sucked into the black hole once the cockpit is assembled! Thank you Bill! I elected not to pre-shade this cockpit with black since the RLM 66 is so dark. So all of the essential visual impact is going to come from the detail painting. And yes, I'm thinking about an open canopy on this one. Moving on with the cockpit construction, I am ready to put together the HGW seatbelts. You'll notice the packaging says Me262B... I like to buy Luftwaffe seat harnesses for the two seater because you get two sets of belts instead of one for a similar price. Most Luftwaffe fighters used the same type of harnesses. The mask set? Well, that's all they had in stock. HGW uses some sort of microfiber paper for the belt material and photoetched metal for the buckles. Some people report leaving the buckles on the photoetch frame for easier handling but I like to cut the buckles off and carefully trim off sprue attachment stubs. Remember to take off the backing from the harnesses! Per HGW recommendations, I like to crumple the harnesses before using. It helps loosen the material up a bit and also introduces some random folds and wrinkles. These effects are most noticeable on the longer pieces and sometimes I don't bother crumpling the shorter sections. I use PVA glue to secure the harness folds that hold the buckles in place. You could also use CA glue but the PVA allows better alignment of the folds. The sticky side of a Post-It is convenient for holding the crinkled harnesses down flat to verify consistent lengths and buckle spacing. After the shoulder straps are measured against the seat, they are finalized. The lap belts are constructed next. I've left off the attachment tabs on the seat end because (a) they can't bee seen anyway and (b) they would likely interfere with the already tight fit of the seat into the cockpit tub. The lap belts are glued into place onto the seat using CA glue. The shoulder belts are temporarily affixed to a Post-It. One interesting aspect about the HGW fabric material is that there is some subtle stitching details that have been depressed into the fabric. They are not as consistent as rivets on plastic but additional detail can be highlighted with a wash. So I am giving the belts a gloss coat (Alclad Aqua Gloss) and then a pastel wash of dark brown. Be advised that the crumpling step CAN mar the surface of the fabric so that the pastel wash can leave permanent stains. I'm ok with this. I can now start assembling the cockpit. The seat and control stick are glued into place using CA glue. I've added an oxygen tube per the directions on the Eagle Editions cockpit. The sidewalls and rear cockpit sill are next to be glued into place, again using CA glue. The foot pedals are glued into the roof, which is left completely unpainted because it will not be visible at all. The roof holding the foot pedals cap off the cockpit tub. Remember all of the careful painting including the bright yellow electrical wiring? Most of it disappears after the boxing in of the cockpit. The main instrument panel is glued into the front cockpit hood, along with the shelf for the Revi 16B gun sight. The cockpit stage is complete and we can verify the fit of the resin cockpit into the fuselage sides.
    23 points
  41. So a year in the making, not quite as I wanted and plenty of mistakes along the way. Hope you like it, I know I can do better. Photography needs to improve too.
    23 points
  42. Thanks Matt! I've learned a lot here at LSP and hope to keep growing as a modeler. No matter how good we think we are, there is always someone doing it better. Thanks Kevin! I do hope that this build thread is useful for people building this kit. Thanks Jay! I appreciate the input sincerely! We all have different strengths and weaknesses and I don't think my choices resonate with everyone. But we do what we are compelled to do, right? I admire your build abilities immensely so I am gratified to hear such positive comments from a model of your caliber. A sincere thank you, Chuck! Exactly! That's what makes this hobby so fun and interesting. I referred to many different builds of this kit and even of this specific aircraft and they all look a little different. I make no claims of authenticity or quality but simply present this as my personal take on this cool WW2 fighter aircraft. Ok guys... this one is a wrap! I removed the mask around the engine and added all of the rest of bits and pieces. Here's a preview while I post all of the finished pics over at the Completed Builds board... The photos of the finished model can be found at:
    23 points
  43. I'm still spending a lot of time in the different wards at the hospital. But I'm finally picking up speed, it has been a long journey... The landing gear has been mounted, and a scratched access ladder. The scratched flaps and some of the decals have been applied. Cheers: Kent
    23 points
  44. Dandiego

    Vigilante

    I have been working on getting the cockpits squared away. I installed some thin sheet raised consoles, painted them black and then glossed them. Because this is just a prototype build I decided to use decals for the instruments. I have purchased a set of F-4 Phantom 3d decals but will wait to use them on my second build. Still lots to do, but you can see how it is shaping up. Ejection seats are still pretty basic, I will be working on them next. Dan
    23 points
  45. Thanks guys! Jumping back onto the D-9 build for a bit... I thought I'd get the upper wing riveting out of the way. Riveting takes some time effort and I need to be motivated to actually put in the hours so when the inclination bubbled up this afternoon, I took advantage of it. The first and most tedious step is to draw the rivet patterns on the model parts. Lots of rivets on the upper wings! Once the rivet patterns are drawn, a wheeled rivet tool is used to punch tiny holes in a linear row. The wings are then sanded to get rid of the raised plastic around each rivet hole. A temporary pastel wash is used to check the results. You can see that the wing surface is nice and smooth now compared to the pic prior to sanding. Both upper wings have been riveted. Circular fasteners along the leading edge of the wing that are added using a beading tool.
    22 points
  46. I received the Special Hobby Grand Giveaway promotion kit late last year. And the build has been underway for six month's. I wanted to build something small to get me back in the ´saddle´ again, in fact I think it's the smallest kit in scale 1/32? It has been quite the journey, in the beginning I struggled a lot, and I had to take some breaks from modelling, waiting for some recuperation. But the last month I'm starting to feel like my self again. I am able to spend whole days at the bench now! Luckily I have almost no long term effect from my brain damage, other than some speaking difficulties and that will absolutely not deter me from modelling. The subject has been the A.186 of one Toné Hippolyte Paul Bayetto, of which there are some great photo's on IWM. The Vignette: The build: Many 'upgrades and a lot of scratched details, too many! But it involved a completely rebuild cockpit and an engine out of the spares box etc. A Tommy's war officers figurine has been adapted to look like 'Hippolyte'. It did the trick, and I'm up and running again Cheers: Kent
    22 points
  47. Thanks Damian! Thanks John! Well, I'm guilty most of the time then because I usually prefer my builds all buttoned up, including canopy. That Tempest build with the exposed engine must've set a precedent. Thanks Michael! Ha ha... I'm quite familiar with this kit so I knew what was going to happen. The yellow wiring was Tamiya X-8 Lemon Yellow. I find Tamiya primary colors (red, yellow, blue, green) to be difficult to apply, whether by airbrush or paintbrush due to their lack opacity. When brush painting, I use the lid of the paint jar as my palette and add a couple of drops of 90% iso alcohol to act as a retarder. It seems to help the paint flow off the brush better. With the yellow, I had to build up the color using multiple strokes. The cockpit seems to fit into the fuselage without issue. I have some work to do before I can think of gluing the fuselage halves together.
    22 points
  48. Dandiego

    Vigilante

    Seats with homemade belts. And some ribbing inside the rear canopy. Later, Dan
    22 points
  49. So after finishing my Tamiya Corsair which had sat quietly on the SOD for about a year my attention has now turned to the F-8 again and much like th Corsair doesn't actually need much to get it over the line, so here we go again and hopefully get White 48 over the line this time! Regards. Andy
    22 points
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