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  1. Hello all, This is my ICM 1H-1G (early) Cobra with Quinta Cockpit. I used a mix of Model Master and AK paints. I also used the Microdesign exterior photoetch set. This aircraft represents the Executioner of the 235th flown by Capt Lou Bouault out of Daub Ting Vietnam 1969. This was my first ICM kit and I have to say it was pretty good! I used the kits decals which went on fantastic. All photos were taken with my Iphone. As you can see by the indoor pics I am no photographer! The base was built and Designed by Master base maker Tony Quartaro. Thanks for looking. Rod
    36 points
  2. I remember a topic a while back discussing pilot's certificates, and someone told me to be sure to shout out when I earned my certificate. I earned it this past Thursday, and honestly I can't remember being so excited since my first solo last year. It's been a long road, but I have never before felt such a sense of accomplishment. It's been my dream to be a pilot since I was 5 years old, and now at 52 I can finally say when people ask me if I am a pilot: YES, I AM. Thanks! Frank
    27 points
  3. Before I glued the resin instrument panel coaming, I decided to remove some of the internal ribbing that is not needed and might get in the way. I secured this piece by wicking thin CA glue into the joints while the part was held in place with my fingers. All of the new joints will be inspected and cleaned up as necessary. Here are some views into the cockpit area with the new parts glued into place. Checking the fit of the clear parts and a good review of the Dora fuselage with the re-shaped gun and radiator cowlings. The pilot armored head rest has been painted. There is a glue blob that needs to be carefully fixed and re-painted. Finally... a disc cut from a piece of stiff paper is used to as a removable mask for the opening of the radiator cowling.
    25 points
  4. airscale

    1/18 Curtiss P40C

    thanks chaps - very kind still adding skins to the wings, so here is where it's at.. along the spar on the upper wing is this long pair of panels which includes two access doors to the guns.. this is then added with a tape hinge & contact cement.. the panel above the aileron has already been added with a cutout for the inspection hatch.. ..hatch added with scored ali tube for a hinge.. ..tape used to derive the shape of the leading edge panel - a pencil is used with tape to determine the rivet lines and once this is removed represents the real world shape that is needed to skin this area.. ..the tape is carefully removed and used to create the wraparound panels.. ..that panel is then added to both wings.. ..more panels & hatches added to the top wings.. ..same for the bottoms, the panel around the U/C fairing is the precursor to the compound panels that will cover it, plus the ammo doors have been added.. ..its getting close to the point where the wings are added to be able to skin the U/C areas so I may move onto fuselage skins at the tail & nose while they are seperate parts as they are easier to handle - the upshot is I want to get as much skin on as I can without putting it in danger areas for filling / sanding etc until next time TTFN Peter
    24 points
  5. When I lived in Miami in the 80s a USMC WWII Corsair pilot and I became friends. His name was Jim Wilkens and he shared his memories, his log book and a few small photos of himself while he was flying out of Espiritu Santo with VMF 225. As a result of that friendship I built the old Revel Corsair as a tribute to his service. No big deal but I did add a couple upgrades like a scratch built seat, belts, gun sight, exhaust and a scratch built bomb rack. I also printed my own dry transfer markings. Back then this kind of extreme weathering was unheard of, but I didn't know the "rules" I just tried to replicate the condition of these birds based on the photos that were available at that time. Needless to say the IPMS judges were not impressed. I always hoped that someone would release a better 1/32 Corsair but when Tamiya did I just did not have the time or a workspace to build one. Running a business has a way of sucking the life out of you and keeping you from enjoying hobbies. Then a few years ago I realized that time wasn’t on my side so I jumped back into the hobby with the goal of building enough skills to tackle my dream build, my friend’s F4U-1A. So after some research and viewing the entries in Jim’s log book, here I am hoping my eyes and hands hold out long enough (I’ll be 76 in December ’22) to accomplish what appears to be a daunting task. And so it begins:
    23 points
  6. Finally got a few days of glorious weather, it was time to get back to starting the paint-job on the Hurri! Using some different mottling/stain masks I had lying around, put down some shades of greys and browns over the silver base (with some chipping fluid sprayed on first) Staying away from pure blacks, but using base tones of either AK Interactive NATO Black, or Blue Black, mixed with some drops of Royal Blue, or IJN Green, Buff, etc - just to vary the tones of the coats, which were applied very thinly. I then proceeded to lightly chip the frame, and lightly sanded the raised detail to bring out the silver layer below. Here you can see that underlying tonality showing through the topcoat, and the result of the light sanding of the raised detail. The different tones, etc, are much more visible with the naked eye... Port side zoomed in a bit - the tones are more evident in this shot - further weathering plus the addition (in contrast) of the national insignia will tone things down a little.
    22 points
  7. Thanks Mike! Thank you Kevin! Thanks Sasha! Thanks Jay! I hope I'm not making everyone dizzy by jumping between these two builds. I bought the big saw for larger resin pieces and it works really well for that. Tamiya #74024 Thin blade modeling razor saw. I've gone ahead and given the brass flaps a coat of primer... Mr Primer Surfacer 1000, thinned with Mr Leveling Thinner, and shot through the airbrush. Based on my experience with the Special Hobby Tempest build, I'm not going to paint the flap bays until after the camo painting. This will save on some time as it is much easier to mask the rectangular opening for painting rather than trying to mask and protect the painted flap bays in place. Another new product to introduce... 1ManArmy's stencil masks! I saw a review on The Modeling News website and when I learned that they had a set available for the Hasegawa Fw190D-9 kit, I thought I'd given them a try. They are essentially paint masks for aircraft data stenciling to replace decals. I guess this is the next logical step in my progression from using decals to buying Montex masks for the larger insignias and then buying a Silhouette Portrait craft cutter to create my own masks. Data stencils on 1/32 aircraft are beyond the resolution of the knife-based craft cutter and 1ManArmy employs some sort of laser-cutting process to make these incredibly fine masks. A complete set of data stencils is provided as well as a few generic larger markings with a detailed set of placement instructions. I am going to test these masks on the landing gear covers, which I've painted in RLM 74 Dark Grey. But before the data stencils, I'm going to paint the Brown 4 using custom masks from my cutter. I used a 1:1:1:1 mix of Tamiya White, Orange, Red Brown and Red to match the color on the Eagle Editions decal sheet. The laser process seems to have burned away most of the smaller, free-floating pieces of the mask, which is a very good thing. On a similar mask from the craft cutter, you'd have to manually pick away these bits from the mask, which can be tedious. One drawback to these masks is accurate placement. It can be tricky to do since the yellow masking material is opaque and not see-through. Additional masking is another drawback... you have to protect the areas outside of the small masks from overspray. But the result is impressive! It's difficult to make out the black from the dark grey background but the masks work as advertised. However, I made the mistake of spraying gloss thinned with Mr Leveling Thinner to seal the paint job on the gear covers. DON'T use MLT over an area treated with hairspray or else you may get the weird spider-web effect that I got on my gear covers. I'm not sure I liked how the hairspray chipping worked out anyway so I'll probably be wiping these clean and doing it all over again. And I'm going to test the idea of re-using the 1ManArmy masks as I've carefully saved the ones I've used.
    22 points
  8. A-7D Corsair II 120th, Colorado ANG. Trumpeter model 1:32 Painted with Hataka Hobby Red. A-7D Corsair II Trumpeter 1:32
    21 points
  9. Sorry but I'm going to postpone my other builds for a bit. I was asked by Special Hobby if I would do another build for their Blog. And of course I said yes, I couldn't pass this opportunity to collaborate on this build and share my experiences with them. So this is going to my first ever Japanese build and a on top of that an old one . The Mitsubishi A5M4 Claude "Hi-Tech" 1/32 I didn't have any knowledge of this airplane, but the more I read about it the more intriguing it became. I've decided to recreate the first aircraft of Matsuo Hagiri. A legend by Japanese standards... And if nothing else, because of his moustache Matsuo Hagiri first saw combat in china september 1940, piloting a zero fighter his squadron annihilated any chinese fighter encountered with no losses, in October 1940 Hagiri and tree other zero fighter pilots landed on a chinese airfield for a sabotage mission destroying several fuel tanks, they managed to escape under heavy chinese machine gun fire, he then recieved a china incident war medal for his actions and returned to japan as a pilot instructor, in july 1943 he is sent to the solomons islands On September 23, 1943, 27 planes of a Zero fighter Group are sent to intercept an Allied raid against the base. hagiri destroyed tree Corsair fighters but was wounded by machine gun fire, in 1944 he returned to japan for the defence of tokyo against the B-29 he destroyed two b-29 bombers before being wounded by machine gun fire, during his career he won 15 air victories, he died in 1997. Here he is aboard the Japanese Carrier 'Soryu'. You can see him in the middle, sitting down, with the moustache! The decals of the Special Hobby doesn't cover this type of markings... So I had to get the the Berna Decals set too.. A friend of mine was able to decode the meaning of these Japanese letters on the A5M4. The first line "報国-266/Houkoku-266" denotes "The 266th IJN aircraft donated to the IJN", Then the second line "岩井號/Iwata-Gou" denotes the donator's name "岩井/Iwata". So there it is, No. 261 + I've got my story about Matsuo Hagiri and even a photo of him and his A5M4, what can go wrong? Cheers: Kent
    20 points
  10. Jumping temporarily over to the Hien build as I wait for some products to arrive on the Dora build. A fuel regulator was fashioned from a piece of sprue, a strip of brass sheeting and couple of Anyz line connectors. Not knowing what color it was, I decided on red to match the cartoon drawing of the Hien I posted earlier. Here's the regulator in place. After the regulator was glued into place, I placed some copper wiring to to replicate the two fuel lines.
    20 points
  11. Hey all- here is the ballast fairing unique to the AT-38B. Typical of scratch building, there are three not perfect/destroyed ones at the trash end of my bench- The basic shape was built up with sheet styrene and then skinned- cheers P
    19 points
  12. Something different, everything is digitally created. The "Dave" was modeled in Modo and textured in Substance Painter. The back plates were created in Terragen. I'm planning on working toward altering the modeling to be able to 3D print a 1/32 "Dave". #4 aircraft from Haruna at Midway. (At least my interpretation of the markings.) "Dave"s over China. Dave
    18 points
  13. Part Two of painting the exterior of the landing gear covers. A base coat of Tamiya AS-12 decanted into the airbrush was treated with hairspray and covered with RLM 74 Dark Grey (Mr Hobby Aqueous). A stiff paint brush dipped in water was used to disrupt the RLM 74 and cause chipping, mostly around the edges of the covers. I changed up the order and painted the data stencils next. Compared to a US nickel and penny, you can get a sense of how incredibly fine the text is. The stencil masks have a lost a bit of their adhesiveness but retained enough to still work well. The custom recipe for the brown was mixed and used to paint the "4" via custom cut masks. The landing gear cover attachment bolts were often in need of repair and many Doras have visible primer applications around these bolts. I replicated this by brush painting rough circles around a few random bolts using RLM 76 Light Blue (Mr Hobby Aqueous). The covers were then sprayed with Alclad Aqua Gloss thinned with 91% iso alcohol instead of Mr Leveling Thinner. A black pastel wash was used to highlight the rivets and panel lines and the gear covers were given a flat coat (Model Master Clear Flat Acryl) to seal the painting.
    18 points
  14. Thanks guys! I've made some progress on this build that I'd like to share. First of all, here is the first set of Archer control surface decals under a coat of primer. It's a pretty subtle effect and I have to take care not to cover it with too much paint. I'm jumping over to the fuselage now and will be attaching the Eagle Editions resin cockpit. The cockpit tub slides into place from the opening in the fuselage bottom. Since the contact surfaces are inaccessible, I like to use a two-part epoxy, which is nice and thick and will give me about five minutes to set the position of the cockpit correctly before the epoxy starts to harden. The front edge of the cockpit butts up against the engine bulkhead, which gives solid reference point in the attachment. Instead of the thin brass part that the Eagle Editions cockpit set provides, I like to use the rear deck, cut from the kit part as the fit is more positive. Now that the cockpit is glued into place, I will now start attaching the front cowling pieces. Before I do that, I've prepainted the interior ring on the fuselage front in RLM02. The exhaust recesses have also been painted black. The gun barrels above the engine are glued into place. I'm using the kit parts here with the ends hollowed out. When mounted, they are standing proud of the surrounding gun troughs so they'll be easy to paint afterwards. The gun cowling is now glued into place using Tamiya Extra Thin cement. Fit is excellent here. The radiator flaps are glued in next. Remember that the actuating rods were installed and interior of the flaps painted earlier. The radiator face is glued onto the cowling flaps. One thing that's always puzzled me is why Hasegawa chose to have this attachment via vinyl poly caps as if this part were meant to be removable. I see no reason to detach the radiator cowling??? Also visible in the photo is the black mounting block for the Henri Daehne prop shaft that I mentioned previously. Since the radiator face butts up directly against the cowling flap part, I've run a bead of Tamiya Extra Thin cement around the circumference to permanently attach the radiator face. Here's a peak from underneath showing the installed Eagle Editions cockpit tub. The radiator cowling is glued into place, finishing off the front end. As you recall, one of the first things I did on this build was to re-shape this part.
    18 points
  15. Hi Jay- pretty sure it’s a big hunk of steel. It’s necessary because the AT-38B has a fixed centerline pylon; and frequently hung either a 7.62 mini gun or SUU-20 bomb dispenser. The ballast is to correct the center of gravity when stores are carried on the centerline.. but even without the stores the weight was never removed..giving it a slightly aft CG, which was not bad for air to air training. heres the basic shape of the ballast counterweight - just need to true up the corners a bit..and reduce its width..it’s pooching the sides of the container out- cheers P
    17 points
  16. I continued with the 190. Painted the glider in 74, 75, stained it.
    17 points
  17. This is Revell's 1/32 scale 1983 boxing of the Phantom :-) Done to the new IPMS Basic Kit Build rules. Beyond the paint scheme I thinned the trailing edges, drilled out the fuel vents and other miscellaneous vents on the aircraft, painted in some vents as well, and made everything that I could work just the way Revell wanted it to be for the kids who originally built these...just like me, a big kid now :-) You can check out the full build by following the link in my sig if interested In memory of Jason - USMC Herc. Semper Fi
    16 points
  18. Wayne Beattie

    1/48 OA-4M

    Hasegawa 1/48 scale TA-4J converted to an OA-4M using Phase Hanger resin set and Furball decals. Painted with Vallejo products.
    15 points
  19. The office is now complete. I used the kit tub as the foundation and used the Aires seat, Aires pedals, HGW seatbelts and Yahu instrument panel as upgrades. I didn't think the Aires tub was worth the work since it didn't add much detail compared to the kit part. The Aires seat, however, looked much better than the kit version. It has a nifty leather pad for lumbar support. The kit tub doesn't reflect the false bulkhead on either side of the seat, but I think it looks reasonable overall. I added a scratch O2 regulator to the starboard side of the seat. I used Mr. Color paints with some dark brown and black pastel washes for weathering as well as colored pencils for chips and scratches. To reflect the canopy slide rail, which isn't represented at all by the kit parts or the Aires upgrade, I added sections of stretched sprue to either side of the cockpit sill and painted them metallic grey with some silver highlights. (See the first photo also.) I applied some Airscale Luftwaffe cockpit placards to the side panels for some added detail. I think they really dress up the panels. I used the hi-res Smithsonian cockpit photo as the reference for the placards and labels. Some artistic license was also in play. I also added a leather strap for the map case on the starboard side. The Yahu instrument panel comes as a simple set of panels without a support structure. To mount them I filed off the detail from the kit IP and attached the Yahu panels using CA glue. It's a fun build so far. I'm following some of the other build threads on the forum for ideas and watch-outs and am also using the "tweak list" from Thierry Laurent as a punch list reference. Thanks for looking. Comments and critiques are always welcome.
    14 points
  20. Thanks guys! Here's a look at few more fabric-covered control surfaces per Archer's decals covered with primer. Now that the control surfaces are done, I can move forward toward completing the wings. The Quickboost resin cannon barrels are glued into the wheel well. The attachment for the landing gear is molded into the wing bottom so don't forget to paint that to match the rest of the wheel wells. The wheel well insert is then glued into the wing bottoms using Tamiya Extra Thin cement. While the glue dries, I've jumped over to the landing gear legs to finish those off. The brake lines, made of copper wire and painted black, are glued into place. The interior of the landing gear covers were painted in RLM 02 Grey (Mr Hobby Aqueous). The SOW composite legs are glued using CA glue. The wheels will not be mounted until after the plane can sit on her own legs so that I can properly orient the flat spots. But here is what the completed landing gear legs look like with the wheels on.
    14 points
  21. The Hi Tech parts of the kit. Resin and PE. Kit parts for cockpit walls and floor. First I have thinned out the cockpit pieces as well as the fuselage, to avoid the 'double' layer in the cockpit area. Drawings and a photo providing some info as to the layout of the cockpit. I've put some stringers in the back, I don't know if they are going to show, probably not, but better safe than sorry.. Works on the right side of the Cockpit, adding some extra details, cables etc. Same on the left side of the cockpit. Details of the cockpit. The resin Instrument panel is very nice in the 'high tech'. The floor has been converted as per drawings. Resin seat and the cockpit wall behind the seat. Cheers: Kent
    14 points
  22. So I decided it would be best to get the MER loaded and installed at this stage of the build. I'm trying to get as much done underneath as possible, as long as whatever I'm gluing on won't be at high risk for being broken during routine handling while I wrap the kit up. Prior to, I repainted the sway brace bolts, the previous black was just too "black". I've been using Modelmaster Jet Exhaust for some detail work like this, it comes across as a nice, dark-ish grey metallic color. Perfect for hardware like bolts, etc. The resin M117's went on pretty easily with just some patience and a dab of superglue. The hardest part was making sure all 4 bombs were properly aligned. I'm pretty happy with the end result. I also did some additional work on the underside, installing the tailhook and cover at it's base and touching up some gaps near the engine exhausts. For final weapons configuration, I'm trying to replicate this loadout (generally, I get it that the bombs in the picture didn't have fuse extenders). What I'm not sure on is whether I'll add the last M117 on the rear centerline station on the MER (where I think it is present in the picture above) or maybe do a "slant 2" configuration on the TER. Oh well, I've got a bit of time to work through that. One think I really like - those M117's just look bad-assed, especially compared to the "skinny" Mk82's that you often see on later-war F-4's. The other thing is now that I'm putting bombs on my F-4, I am realizing what an absolute beast the Phantom was. Just a massive, powerful, war machine. It could also take a punch or two and get it's crews home. So here are a few pics of my progress so far. Looks like i still have a bit of cleanup to do on that exhaust shroud. No biggie. Also, note the upward angle on the white camouflage right before the exhaust. Just a minor deviation from the normal pattern, 589 appears to be the only jet that had this minute change. Fundekals caught it during their research, and I've incorporated it into my build. That's for today, thanks for checking in.
    14 points
  23. I am glad that I took the trouble to fab up a couple of "proof of concept" panels. It paid off. Lessons learned from that, plus verification that the concept was viable (hybrid panel with magnets), allowed me to produce four virtually error-free engine cowl panels: Note also the dog-bone shaped splice plates at the joints. The all important view from the front: A rear view showing how well (or poorly) the panels lay down on the cowl flap ring: It'll do! I tell you - back to back magnets (as I used at the nose cowl) works great. The panels just snap into place. Magnets and stainless steel sheet, where the magnets are underneath a thin layer of plastic (I used this at the cowl flap ring), doesn't work nearly as well. The attraction is a little weak. I had to do that way. So I had to fiddle around a whole lot with the panel contours to get them to lay down decently. The insides - supposed to be painted either gray or white - I chose gray, and then got them nice and dirty: You might wonder how I am to properly clock four cowl panels, where there is nothing for any of them to butt up against. This is how I did it: First I installed a small "alignment pin" on the bottom of the nose cowl: That pin engages a slot on the inside of either bottom panel: Installed it looks like this: Once one panel is located, then the other three are easily located. This shot shows that without a doubt, a panel (or all of them) can be removed to show the engine - a goal of mine since I started this build: Lastly, for the "it's beginning to look like a Corsair" file, this shot: I have sent off a 3D print order, and the parts will be in my hot hands in a week or two. Included in that order are corrected cowl flap details, and once I have them I can proceed on the very difficult cowl flaps. In the mean time - I dunno, I suppose I will finish skinning the wing upper surfaces..... Thanks for looking in folks.
    14 points
  24. I did some design work and have this to hand for the 1/24 Airfix Bf109E i need to tweak it still to thin the end section frames and some other refinements, but was thinking I could add it to our range? It's quite a big fret so would need to retail for £21.95 so still undecided any love? works with kit parts, or as here can be easily glazed.. Peter
    13 points
  25. Some more work on Brown 4. I've replaced the wing camera opening with a ring punched from sheet styrene to make it more uniformly circular. Next, I decided to paint the exhaust pipes. I'm using the kit pieces that I've modified by hollowing out the ends with an x-acto blade. The exhausts are given a base coat of black. This is followed with a coat of Alclad Steel. Next is a light coat of Alclad Exhaust Manifold, which gives the exhausts a bronze tint. I mix up a rusty brown color using Brown, Red and Yellow. This is dry-brushed onto the exhausts. It's back to the airbrush for the last step. I spray a thin mix of black into the openings of the exhaust, isolating each individual pipe with a small Post-It. And the exhausts are finished. I'm sure there are other, better ways to paint exhausts but this method is relatively simple and repeatable and yields decent results. Here's a look at how the exhausts look mounted in the fuselage.
    13 points
  26. Thanks for the tip, can't keep anything secret these days my MO (modus operandi) is showing - Well of course I have planned to make a little vignette with a piece of the carrier deck of Soryu. And I'm already ahead of you. While I was waiting for the kit to arrive, I used the time to work on some pilots of the 'Soryu Kokutai'. Notice the middle figure with the moustache! Cheers: Kent
    13 points
  27. Work continues on Brown 4... I've augmented the coolant and oil overflow ports with brass tubing. Here is a look at the rudder with the Archer control surface decal applied. This one took the most time and effort since the Ta152H tail is slightly different than the standard 190 and the decal had to be custom cut to fit. The upper wings have been glued onto the wing bottom. I'll take some time inspecting the glue seam and cleaning it up. The brass flap bays have been glued into place using CA glue. I'm going to run a bead of black CA glue along the trailing edge since it is both a glued joint and a PE folding edge. This oval panel just outboard of the landing gear attachment has been filled with black CA glue. From my understanding, this panel indicates a conversion from a 190A, which had an outer wing gun position. Since not D-9's were converted from earlier A-series airframes, this panel is not present on all Doras. I have a decent view of the leading edge of Brown 4's wing and based on that photo, I am removing this panel. This might be related to the panel that I've removed from the upper wing. My guess is that it is related to a conversion from an 190A wing. Again, I have a reference photo that happens to show that area of the wing and I can see no indication of the panel so it too has been filled with black CA glue. Let's a take a look at the kit prop compared to the resin prop from Henri Daehne. Beyond the subtle shape differences, the resin spinner has a nicely defined panel line around the middle with a row of rivets. The openings for the prop blades is noticeably larger on the HD version as well. The larger opening is necessary to accommodate the well-detailed prop blade attachment rings, complete with counterweights.. The prop blades shapes are similar but the HD's is "curvier" with a noticeable hump at the base of prop blade. The prop hub and backplate... no comparison between the two! Please note the that I've already modified the hub cover and embedded a tiny magnet within. This matches another magnet that I've glued into the spinner cap, allowing the removal of the spinner cap to show the detail underneath. I always procrastinate with the painting of nice resin parts and HD's resin props are probably the nicest resin I've run across so it might be awhile before I work up enough nerve to throw paint on these.
    12 points
  28. Painted the hood, stylized wings, fuselage stripe, "worm". With the lettering on the bottom of course the question, but in many pictures of this car it is. Photo of the original is not the best quality, at least better not found, it is not visible whether it is there or not. In general, many other things are also not very visible and raises a number of questions.
    12 points
  29. Have been busy with life (which seems to still get in the way a lot!) so progress has been slow. Finally got the engine done (hardly a technical challenge, LOL) but I did play around with a wash, which I have very little experience with. The result is nowhere near the level of some of the incredible work I've seen here, but I'm satisfied with it. The wash really enhances the detail on the cylinders!
    12 points
  30. Renegade

    1/32 Mirage F.1C

    Hi Guys, The flaps and aileron cut out. The flap slots were a pain to get the curves and angles. After some primer, I can see that I sanded away a little uneven on some spots, but will get it right. A quick mock up to see what they look like, but will get a better idea later when their brackets and rails are in place. Cheers, John
    11 points
  31. Hello! I finished this about one year ago. I used the Trumpeter kit, Eduard PE and Quickboost exhausts (as far as I remember). The figures are slightly converted ICM figures, backdated to 1941 (no shoulder straps in the soviet army till 1943) and equipped with resin heads. The crows are from Preiser. This project was big fun and there were no issues with the kit as far a I remember. The markings were sprayed using Montex masks. I hope you like it! Best regards, Andreas
    11 points
  32. The smaller tanks were made look like the british. As far as I have seen they had rivets on it. These were made using resin rivets from ARCHER in different sizes. Some more details were made using again sheet and bolts made by a puch&die set. After painting I used the kit decals which were horrible to put on. Even softener hardly didn´t work. I think, the base kit was one of the first release from the 90ies. The tanks still need some weathering, The Phimat chaff dispenser pods had to be made by scratch. Different rods, tubes and the front ends from 1/35 grenades needed only some sanding. The fins are made of thin sheet, cut to size using a NWSL `The Chopper II`. To put them later very easy to their stations, I put in two copper wires. A BIG thank you to my friend Alex who let me his 1/48 Eduard Phimats to use them as a master. As with the tanks: some homemade decals and weathering need to be done. The wings had to be cut to add the PARAGON set for separate slats and flaps. Not a big match, cleaning takes most of the time. As with the MLG earlier - no photos from a later stage yet. The outer openings for the pylons needed to be closed. Again, a 1/35 grenade was helpful.
    11 points
  33. Progress. A mixture of Eduard, Resin2Detail and scrap plastic/wiring etc. This looks a lot like the work I did on the long, lost 24J a few years back, but being a D in the Pacific there will be some differences. The smaller radio is an extra B-17 radio I had from somewhere with an Eduard face...much more to come, as soon as I can photograph it
    11 points
  34. Renegade

    1/32 Mirage F.1C

    Hi Guys, Next step, the combat flaps. The PLA filament broke up into so many pieces when I cut the combat flap out, that it was like a 3D puzzle to re assemble with lots of CA and filler... Sprayed some primer to do a quick mock up to check the drop angle and slat overlap. Thanks for looking. Cheers
    11 points
  35. canopy test fit https://www.facebook.com/infinitymodels.cz/
    11 points
  36. chrish

    HK Models Lancaster

    I will attempt (please dont expect too much) this beast; some update stuff; Canadian decals; resin flight deck bits and Master gun barrels...somewhere in this mess
    10 points
  37. thanks again guys! Mike, i just. saw your post... and i spent so much time to figure out how to create the extra fabric ayer on the leading edge... i finally. did it , but now too much trouble for nothing i guess :)))
    10 points
  38. Added some thingees to the seat: Seat belts follow after painting. Regards - dutik
    10 points
  39. As written before, the front landing gear needs to be wired to get the taxi lighted. Beside that, I improved the FLG omitting one scissor and refining the front scissor to look more like the real thing. Adding some copper wire and repositioning the wheels let the FLG look not that bad. it works Bringing the electricity into the model is carried out by wires going to one wheels of the main landing gear and from there nearly invisible in one leg into the fuselage. Sorry, no photos yet. when putting the model to the base - connectors are used later
    10 points
  40. To complete the fuselage, there is the same problem I faced when putting the engine insert to the kit part: the conversion part is slightly to small in diameter. Again, the insert after the cockpit is too small. After puttying/sanding (to get a smoother surface) I used leadfoil to enlarge the upper part of the insert. Doing this using leadfoil was easier for me than trying sheet On the fuselage sides I used very thin sheet that was `melted` using MEK (I have no idea what this really is, but I bought mine from a hobby shop in Germany as a plastic glue. A friend of mine works as a aircraft mechanic and he uses this when cleaning parts when repairing aircraft). When dry, you have plastic that needs some sanding - and that´s all. You can engrave it as the kit parts with no difference. Let´s see how big this kit will be! On the right hand side you can see two wires for lighting the model up later Next stop: the wing gloves. During taxiing the wings are swept forward. The kit parts are built to have the wings swept back, so there is a big gap to be filled. In my view, the kit parts are not that bad at all when removing the lips leaving just the frame. I engraved a piece of lead foil representing these lips, bend it and made four parts in the end. Then two parts were glued to the frame of the kit part. When closing the fuselage at a later stage, these lips are glued and then one can carefully bend the lead foil into shape looking much better then. One note: I tried wing gloves from Two Mikes and Paragon. Sorry to say, both can´t match with these lead foil lips.
    10 points
  41. Checking the front fuselage parts. Beside some sink holes, there are a lot of panel lines to be filled and some panels to be moved forward/downward, i. e. the AoA sensors The gun opening on the port side had been filled filling the holes using heated/streched sprue one of the first critical moments: to cut behind the cockpit section. There are some more things to do: engrave the panel lines, i. e. the panel for the refuelling boom or to reposition the emergency canopy release handle the forward missile bay in a rarely seen colour. Reminds me on all the Smileys Beside the friendly looking yellow, I had to putty and sand at least 6-7 times to make the surface smooth. During the putty-sessions, I diluted the putty using a brush and acetone - it did a smooth surface and hardened faster than the putty normally does without acetone as you can see the parts can´t deny their origin - a 3-D-printer. Nothing that can´t be dealt with! nearly every part needs this treatment, here the nose cone. Having enough putty at hand, all you need just a little time... the engine insert needed more treatment, since it´s slightly smaller in diameter than the kit part. Beside that I cut off the rectangular openings of the unused kit parts and inserted them to the new part. The round openings are made of rod. Don´t forget to do the opening for the last tip of the arrestor hook. My first challenge was then the engraving/rivetting of this insert. Since the material acts different to the usual plastic, I recommend to paint the part white or light grey and do carefully engrave or rivet. To hard and the lines of the printed plastic break all to fast. the intakes look good but show rough surface in- and outside caused during the printing process. At first, I tried to sand them down inside which is nearly impossible. Next I took a brush and took some white wall paint inside. After sanding I repeated this some 3-4 times and finished it by spraying white from Gunze. It is much smoother now inside, but not perfect at all. But - who will ever recognize.... As Tornados had their auxiliary air intakes (sorry it this the wrong term) open, I had to open them as well. But, when the auxiliary air intakes are opened, the part of the conversion set stands in the way. Ok, let´s cut/shorten the part. There was some sanding to bring these parts together. I will blend the conversion part to the kit parts later using lead foil and even more puttying and sanding - it´s a little time consuming but it works, so no one will see the edge later when looking into the intakes
    10 points
  42. some more progress.; detail on the landing gears number 6 masked and painted.. wooden blade propeller from eagle parts.. (i am not sure about this, but as far as i am aware late war FW A8 had wooden blades instead of hollow metal.? ) and starting the weathering , first with some aluminum chipping effect on the wings . thank you!
    10 points
  43. denders

    Oooooold Revell P-51B

    Another update, wings and tail.
    10 points
  44. Across the line... Well finally the beastie is finished! it was an epic build and my first all resin kit. Jetmads did a piece of wonder there even though it shows that they still have kinks to work out. For a resin kit it was humanely priced at $190 for a preorder. They kept the price down with using 3D printing technology and that was a mixed blessing. Even though it got cheaper it demanded more work to remove printlines, I suppose you have to reach compromise of speed and resolution when you have to fill hundreds of orders. Though I think they could have done things a bit better by aligning the parts as to minimize the printlines. For example the cockpit and it's parts suffers greatly from printlines and they are hard to remove. It was actually so bad that the printlines in many cases ruined the fantastic details they put into the model. I found that the best way to remove lines was to brutally scrape with scraping tool or knife. This meant in turn that details on the fuselage had to be removed to asure the best surface treatment. The hardest part was the joining of the fuselage and main wings, it ate lots of putty and was hindered by the hot air exhausts on the fuselage as they were always in the way and got damaged in the blending process. They would have benefitted from being separate parts. The next thing I didn't like that much was the decals, The big sheets were good quality and printed by Cartograf, though they skipped a lot of stencils! As a nerd I frown upon such short cuts! But the air wing insignias were terible, I had a friend print new ones for me that truly made them justice. The resin pitot tubes and probes was another headache...they snapped as fast I looked at them, I finally managed to replace them with brass from Masters 1/32 Gripen set It sounds like I bash Jetmads but I don't really, their product is fantastic and with a wee bit of extra tinkering it would be absolutely, incredebly awesome! My suggestions for improvement is as follows: New instruments, preferably 3D printed acrylic ones like Red Fox or Quickboost. Metal parts for pitot tubes and probes And add the fuselage hot air exhausts as separate parts instead of molded on to the fuselage. Improve the decal sheet These are the big things....all the small things you just have to deal with as a model builder Finally, I truly enjoyed the build and I learnt a lot about working in this media and in the end I got pretty close to what I wanted to achieve.... This is NOT my last Gigant Viggen! Cheers and thanks for all the support during the build!
    9 points
  45. some progress here too.. landing gears on , and i will start the underside weathering
    9 points
  46. Just come across some really great photos during a flight sim search. The plane in question is an Erla built G-6 that was on display at this years EAA Oshkosh air show. The plane is said to be very accurately restored over a ten year period, and there's lots of photos that will be very useful to modellers, starting at post #5. Erla built Bf-109G-6 Cheers, Michael
    9 points
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