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David Mooney

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About David Mooney

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    LSP Junkie

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    Male
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    Dalry

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  1. Loving that, superb outcome indeed. Well done.
  2. Thanks again for the kind comments, I think I will now try and dirty up my next builds to get them looking a bit more used. As some have said, they look nice and clean, so the next step is to get them looking more realistic and used. Thanks again.
  3. Thanks everyone for the kind comments. The dio is something I'm working on to display my tanks and planes on for scene settings. Once it's done, it will be a repair/servicing base. Thanks again for the comments :-)
  4. Second one completed of 2019 is the Focke-Wulf Fw190 A5 from Hasegawa, this again (same as the Bf-109 G10) is a great kit, with no issues at all. Painted with Mr Colour paints and thinners (amazing products in my opinion). My choice of aircraft was quite easy as the Stab/Jagd-Erganzungsgruppe aircraft of Ost, Maj Herman Graf was so colourful and different, this was based in France 1943. If anyone can enlighten me on the markings, id be very grateful of the knowledge.
  5. This is a Hasegawa 1/32 Bf-109 G-10 and it proved a very easy build, no major fit issues at all (a nice change). I have painted it using MrColour paints to represent an aircraft from 2./JG300 Feldwebel Ederhard Gzik based in Germany, October 1944. I added some photo etch seat belt from Eduard to set the cockpit off, I hope you like 'Rita', I am quite happy with the results.
  6. Now that's something different and really well done. Great colours and love the way the orange has come out, it looks really realistic.
  7. You will love this kit then, the possibilities for scratch building are quite endless. I do agree wholeheartedly about the cowlings, the ones I had in my two kits, the detail wasn't as good as the aircraft plastic. The issue really comes when you need to panel wash the cowlings as the detail wasn't deep enough to accept a wash, so some of these panels needed a light re-scribe to open them up. None the less though, a good kit.
  8. Awwww matron, so cheeky 'Kenneth Williams' lol! They are great kits, maybe a little to over detailed (causing a few minor fit issues) if you're not 'opening' her up to see the extra detailing. But, a kit I'd certainly recommend.
  9. After completing the second of the two P-47D, I couldnt help myself with the title of this post :-) This aircraft is 42-75242 which was flown by Capt Michael Quirk flying for 62nd FS/56th FG, Halesworth. Now the two Jug's together...... Jug #2 can be seen @ Thanks for looking at me Jugs
  10. Certainly a great start to your stay here, well done
  11. Well I was build two at once....so I hope to have a good couple of jugs :-) soon. Thank you for your kind comments
  12. Happy new year to the modelling world and builders!! This is my 1/32 Trumpeter P-47D Razorback with the Kits-world War Birds decals used. This kit went together well, even though there a few minor instruction issues, but nothing major to overcome. Painted with MRP paints...……….which are highly recommended! Built out of the box other than the decals. A bit about the man:- 2Lt Paul Ellison who was shot down by flak on 17th July 1944 while flying "Tipsy". After taking off from Picauville he was hit by flak just after bombing the bridge at Conde-sur-Vire. Bits of the wing started to fall away and Ellison bailed out at about 1000ft. He evaded capture and returned to military control on 2nd August. Now the machine......well, my version of it :-) Hope you like it, id like some feedback on the prop as I tried for the first time, the salt weathering technique it simulate some weathering on the prop. Thanks for looking, all comment are welcome
  13. Yes, I tried not to over do the weathering, which is pretty tricky to 'get it right'. Thanks for everyone's kind comments :-)
  14. If the cat don't knock them off lol! Thanks for the comments :-)
  15. This is my Spitfire Vb built from the Hobbyboss kit, I know many complain about it for a few reasons, but to me it looks like a Spitfire...…...and that's good enough for me lol! Its was built out of the box and MRP paints were used. Hope you like it, but here is a bit about the man in the machine first. Squadron Leader 'Buck' Casson, who has died aged 88, escaped from France in May 1940 to fly Spitfires over south-eastern England during the Battle of Britain; later he was a flight commander in Wing Commander Douglas Bader's "Tangmere Wing" before being shot down over northern France in August 1941. Casson was one of the original three trainee pilots to join the newly formed 616 (South Yorkshire) Auxiliary Air Force Squadron at Doncaster in early 1939. Training at weekends and during the annual summer camps, he qualified as a pilot in early 1940 before being sent to France as a reinforcement to 501 Squadron. But, before he could join them, the train on which he was travelling was bombed outside Amiens and he lost all his belongings. Casson managed to escape by boat back to England from Cherbourg. After a brief spell flying Hurricanes with 79 Squadron at Biggin Hill, he rejoined 616 at Leconfield, Yorkshire, just as the Battle of Britain gathered momentum. At lunchtime on August 15, the fighter squadrons based in north-east England were scrambled to face the Luftwaffe's most concentrated attack against industrial targets in Scotland and the north of England. Casson flew one of the 12 Spitfires which met the enemy as they crossed the Yorkshire coast. Within minutes, 616 Squadron had accounted for six of the unescorted bombers, with similar results achieved by other northern-based squadrons. A few days later, 616 flew south to Kenley where the squadron was involved in some of the fiercest fighting of the battle as part of Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park's No 11 Group. Once 616 became fully operational again in early 1941, it was transferred and came under the command of the new Wing Leader, the legless pilot Douglas Bader, at Tangmere. The squadron boasted a glittering array of outstanding pilots, including "Johnnie" Johnson and "Cocky" Dundas. With his steadying and mature influence, allied to the experience gained during the hectic summer days of 1940, Casson became a section leader. On May 5, he shared in the destruction of a Junkers 88, but was hit by return fire, and was forced to bale out over Chichester harbour. On August 9, the "Bader" Wing took off for another sweep over France. During a hectic fight in which German fighters surprised them from above, Bader was shot down, and the Wing was forced to scatter. Casson had accounted for an Me 109 when he went to the aid of a lone Spitfire, but before he could join up he was engaged by a German fighter. Cannon shells damaged his aircraft's engine, forcing him to crash near St Omer, where he was captured. Shortly after his arrival at Stalag Luft III at Sagan, it was announced that Casson had been awarded the DFC. (The Telegraph)
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