Jump to content

easixpedro

LSP_Members
  • Posts

    1,399
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    8

easixpedro last won the day on August 24

easixpedro had the most liked content!

3 Followers

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Omaha, NE

Recent Profile Visitors

3,826 profile views
  1. I don’t need a loony person to muck things up, I’m quite competent in that regard
  2. Thanks for the comments folks! Before I left for work yesterday, I mixed up some rubber molding agent and laid it across the windscreen. Call it insurance if I couldn't salvage the kit part, I could make a resin plug. (Also this particular rubber mold is pretty viscous and tends to ooze everywhere) Managed to get the clear bits off last night, no muss, no fuss. (Had my doubts for sure) The bit in front of the gunsight is from the armored glass...check out the glue smudges along the edge though. Thats how far the Tamiya extra thin seeped. Apparently pooled for a bit before drying - perhaps the angle it was at as it sat on the rod...? And here's the end result. I carved a large bit of gooey clear bits from the leading edge. It was almost like I'd used the old Testors tube glue. Glad I took it off when I did. Anyway, this is after one round of sanding and polishing. I'll give it another round, and then a dunk in future as insurance. (The gray you see peeking through is actually from the shroud, not the clear, so even clearer than the pic) So there we are. Not out of the woods yet. Still have to attach this danged thing, but the crisis (of my own making) has been narrowly averted. -Peter
  3. Sigh... Thought I'd have a super sweet update to share, but the Beast is living up to her nickname. First up is a pic of Infinity's rocket rails. I'm not sure you can even call these rails for the HVARs, as they're really just blobs. Here's my effort after about 10 minutes with some strip styrene. The blobs from Infinity are really attachment points for Canon Plugs for the rockets. Mine aren't 100% accurate yet, but a sight better than the kit offering. Will likely go back and trim the shapes a bit more though. Thought I'd wrapped up work in the forward cockpit and was gonna show you some sweet pics of our intrepid aviator... But if you look at rhe windscreen, I've fallen prey to some horrendous fogging! Annoying part is that I didn't even use super glue! I used Tamiya extra thin. There was a small gap, so I used a bit of sprue that I had thinned with a candle. Shoved it in and used the glue to melt it together. Hasn't produced that effect before, so I'm not sure what happened... Can't call it a minor setback, its a show-stipper if I don't figure it out. The windscreen will have to come off. I'll try and sand it, but it looks worse than any super glue fogging. Have already been trolling Ebay for clear sprues, and nothing is coming up. Maybe cast a resin plug and try smash molding. We'll see...lots to think about at the moment. -Peter
  4. So I’ve been following several SB2C restorations on FB. Fagen Fighters is getting ready to do the engine run on their almost complete -5. It’ll be sweet to see 2 in the air! Anywho, they posted some pics of their almost complete resto, and had this pic. Thought I’d share fore anyone using my ramblings as a reference for their own build. Waaaaaay back on page 3, I showed some of the different fuselage fuel tanks. There are differences between ‘em. The -5 had this square shaped one - and note there’s no roll cage either, they ostensibly used the gigantic armor plate (not installed in this pic) to protect the pilot from getting crushed. -Peter
  5. You aren't wrong... But the real problem was the US Navy and the requirements they put-on Curtiss. Had to be able to fit 2 on the carrier's elevator, carry the same load as an SBD, but internally. When all was said and done, I think Curtiss had to incorporate 800+ engineering changes - after production had already started! Enough to make any aero engineer's head pop. That's what gave it such a bad name. It wasn't until the -3 that it was powered properly. The -4 with perforated dive brakes perfected it. And by that point, the fleet realized they just needed for fighters on the flight deck. -Peter
  6. Kayso, stick with me here. Did a little research and discovered some things about the SB2C that I never knew. I mentioned that no manufacturer got the bomb displacement mechanism correct. It's because they all have the forward part of the bomb bay as a solid wall. It's not... let me 'splain. And enter Tommy Thomason's wonderful blog. BTW, you can read about it here. U.S. Navy Aircraft History: Pre-war Downward-Vision Windows (thanlont.blogspot.com) His article is actually about downward vision windows, but he's got some great shots! Take this picture of the window and mechanism on the SB2U Vindicator. Same concept. (Photo curtesy of Mr. Thomason) Apparently the Beast had a similar window?! Color me floored! Only on the earlier variants (-1 through -3), and covered by an access panel on the -4. Bottom line is Tommy's website and research broke the code for me. Back to this pick It's actually part of a series. You'll see this one on the web all the time. So a little deduction on my part, but basically the arms swing out with the bomb to clear the prop arc and snap back in place. On the SB2C, there's little doors to cover the slots the arms swing through. Have no idea how they work though. The SB2C could carry a single 1,000lb bomb or 2x 500lb bombs in the bomb bay. If it was the 2 bombs, you'd get the arm set up similar to what Revell gives you in their iconic 1/48th offering. In the pic above, the pilot is pickling a single 500 pounder, hence why you only see one arm swing down. It's a training squadron, so I'm guessing a training drop on a gigantic bullseye out in the FL scrub brush. IIRC the SB2C pilots trained in Opa Locka. Standard training SOP is 1 bomb per pass though, so makes sense (at least in my pea-sized noggin). As I was digging, I found pics of what it looked like on the SBD. (Life photo via Google, used for illustrative purposes). Check out how there's a piece attached to the bomb that has little nubs that nestle in the displacement mechanism. It's bolted on to the bomb casing. Obviously the bomb is held via the bomb rack, and the mechanism holds on to the bomb just enough to clear the fuselage and the prop arc. In the same series was this pic. Super motivational! Can you imagine hanging in the proverbial straps, heading straight down as the target throws up a bunch of AAA at you?! Yikes. How about the tail gunner's view as the roll into the dive?! And a similar pic, but with Helldivers vice SBDs. These are SB2C-5's on a training flight off SoCal in late 45-46. So here's the model, once I figured out what I needed to do. Make a couple of cuts to mimic the doors and recreate the access panel that had been obliterated by sanding. And the mechanism made out of styrene. It's kind of flimsy, but actually holds the bomb without glue. I tried making one out of brass rod, but that was an epic fail. Seriously, tried soldering, JB Weld and super glue. All failed. But it's just a simple cross-brace keeping the arms parallel, so a massive moment arm. So oddly the styrene with Tamiya extra thin that melts the plastic wins this round... Also looks like I'll be making another bomb bay door, if you look at this one. Appears as if my solvent based liquid sprue has caused some deformity on the outer surface of the door. I'd used it to help smooth the transitions on the inside of the door. Can't say @Woody V didn't warn me... So there we are: A really long post to describe a couple of simple cuts to make doors and a wonky swing arm contraption. But that's modeling and I thought it interesting enough to share. I've already shifted gears to the cockpits and figures. Need to get the pilot in and the windscreen so I can think about painting. More soon! -Peter
  7. So cool. Still boggles the mind that dudes strapped airplanes like this on and did flight tests. But that was Edwards in the 50s… can’t wait to see her built up!
  8. Quick update as I do some research on the “Bomb Displacement Mechanism.” That’s the gigantic contraption that swings the bomb/bombs down to clear the prop during a dive. Every kit manufacturer has this wrong. I finally found a pic of it in action though, so think I have enough of an understanding to make it. Here’s the pic, and essentially the look I’m going for, (but a moment before with the bomb still attached). Hope to get some time at the bench this weekend to get after it. Till then… -Peter
  9. Good point, and have already seen some of the shrinkage in action. And why I had stopped it back in the day. But I figured it was worth a shot, especially with the amount of sanding and rescribing I’ll be doing. Nice to have the same surface (vice having the blade jump across super glue and give you a super divot in soft plastic…) Figure this bottle will get tossed once the project is complete, cause I’m wary for the reasons you mention.
  10. Yes, the heat gun helped with the wing vane area. But here's how bad my wings are...it's like it's break dancing. Even the trailing edge is wavy. Maybe after the Helldiver, I'll jump back in.
  11. Couple of unexpected days off from work as I was wiped out from a stomach bug. Not much building, but finally feeling well enough to take some pics. Here’s the collapsing turtle back section to give the gunner a clear field of fire. There’s resin & PE aftermarket for this, but easy enough to use the kit bits if you’re careful whilst removing this section. I used the clear bit from the kit, and the fairing that meets the tail. The accordion sides were made with .015 sheet styrene. Couple of passes with the riveter to mimic the kit and it looks the part. And you can see I got the life raft stowage in, as well as the clear bits. Nothing fit here. Not even close. Had to drop the upper rack down a couple mm and still fought with it. The raft is just some lead foil folded over a bunch of times and painted yellow…(hope these feller’s won’t need it in the event of a water landing!) All in all, it looks pretty good! Of course a lot will be covered by the gunner once he goes in, but still. The kit is a good base - remember these are all kit parts I just cleaned up a bit. I was hesitant to show this pic, but worth it to show a) the gaps b) how badly I mangled the alignment on this clear portion! Yikes. That’ll be a do over… You can also see that I replaced the kit bits I’d so carefully cut out to make the windows for a -1 or -3. Also digging the liquid sprue I’d made. Super helpful as it welds itself to the kit plastic and you can’t really tell once sanded. Also used it to fill the gaping holes between the resin canvas shroud/headrest and the upper fuselage. Should clean up well enough when that time comes. Next up were the bomb bay doors. Here’s the ones I cut off the kit. Again, there’s a resin aftermarket set for the bomb bay that includes this. They’re out of stock everywhere and super expensive on EBay. Here’s my first effort (didn’t pass muster and was really a test). Essentially trace the kit bits onto .015 sheet, then made another layer that was slightly smaller. The smaller one gets all the holes drilled in etc. I used some .40 styrene rod to make it proud to mimic the stamped metal of the real bomb bay doors. Here they are after the initials coat of paint. Not bad for me just dorking around. And only 1 previous effort, so pleased with that! And the outside with a coat of GSB. Most of the rivets just disappear. You can barely make out the access panel too. Debating on when to mount these. Before or after painting? Before, I’ll likely knock ‘em off. After, and I think they’ll be just as fragile unless I go back and do an extra good job cleaning paint off the sections where I’m gluing… So that’s it, we’re all caught up. Still lots to go, but the major scratch building is done! Need to sort the cockpits and canopies before I start thinking about paint, but we’re getting closer. Thanks for following along and all the comments! -Peter
  12. Looking great! I started one a year ago and got to about this stage before I realized how badly the wings are warped. So now it sits mocking me…
  13. You know you're not messing around when you grab the BAF (Big A..File) and start going to town on clear bits! Love doing that and sometimes it's the only way to beat something into submission...
  14. Clever problem solving! Love it
×
×
  • Create New...