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Quinta Studio - 3D printed interior for NEW P-51D, Su-25, F-16C


Jan_G
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4 hours ago, vince14 said:

So I'm assuming you've never, ever used a single aftermarket item on a kit?

 

Well, there are quite a few threads in the "Works in Progress" forums proving your assumption is wrong; what about you? Have you ever used aftermarket parts? Many if not most of them require more skills than just assembling a kit from the box. 

 

3 hours ago, thierry laurent said:

True Ben but I think the same can be said about 3D printing or any aftermarket set! In the current case, it is simply impossible to get a similar result with painting whatever are the modeller's skills. 

 

Disagree - fitting and painting aftermarket parts requires skills as does CAD drawing and 3D printing. Peeling off ready-to-use-parts from a backing paper doesn't. 

 

Just to clarify again - that stuff looks great but it's not the fun I'm after when building a model. 

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On 8/25/2020 at 12:47 PM, Jan_G said:

posted on modelofrum.cz

 F-16C cockpit in progress

qd32003_cover.jpg?1596566238

 

Funny, I was just looking at a decal sheet in my stash this exact jet is one of the options.I hope the decals will be a good Block 32 match.

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1 hour ago, Starfighter said:

 

Disagree - fitting and painting aftermarket parts requires skills as does CAD drawing and 3D printing. Peeling off ready-to-use-parts from a backing paper doesn't. 

 

Just to clarify again - that stuff looks great but it's not the fun I'm after when building a model. 

 

Well, each of us is using what he wants but I think stating that this requires no skill is a quick shortcut! I know tons of people who have issues with decals and as I wrote, whatever may be your skills, it is simply impossible to get similar results with painting, even in combination with Anyz decals. Moreover, some nice pit parts will not make a full model. So, wait and see.

 

Do not get me wrong, I fully got you point but as others have written, what about using wood propellers? Relying on aftermaket sets is typically asking for skills ONLY because many of those sets are simply not a drop-fit! When a modeller is using a wood propeller or a 3D-designed resin cockpit that is a drop fit, is he "cheating"? In that logic, we should say yes as he did not detail or rebuild the components himself! Another example: adding Flighpath photoetched PW exhausts on a 1/32 F-15 is a total nightmare few modellers went through whereas now we have drop fit gorgeous one part 3D-printed exhausts. This is just technical evolution and this will obviously decrease the amount of personal effort we must invest in building a model.

 

When I mentioned 3D printing, some may also consider this is somewhat "cheating" for the same reason. Indeed, this is asking for noticeable skills and experience but mainly for CAD skills and they are very far from traditional modelling ones! However, again, CAD and 3D printing allows to reproduce twenty times the same feature on a part whereas doing that manually is VERY difficult. So, they are a godsend and I'm always flabbergasted when I'm looking at what you're producing with them.

 

If we want to go to the extreme, each of us who's building a plane model from a kit is maybe cheating as, indeed, we could create everything from a block of wood! And then we arrive at the conclusion: what is good or fun for a modeller is not for another one! This is also why in correct contests, a fully scratchbuilt kit cannot compete against an OOTB one.

 

I think that multiplying the options and choice of aftermarket items is finally quite positive. I'm sure we will see many new products based on this type of technology in the future as we won't go against that evolution. And, to me, as far as this is giving a level of detail we cannot get with human skills, I'm satisfied even if detailing cockpits is one of my favorite modelling activities!

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2 hours ago, Starfighter said:

Just to clarify again - that stuff looks great but it's not the fun I'm after when building a model. 

But isn't that the beauty of aftermarket parts and decals? If someone finds building cockpits to be less than enjoyable, then it's a positive for them. If you're happy to scratchbuild for hours and hours to make your cockpits more realistic, then that's fine too.

 

There really is no right or wrong here - just whatever suits the individual.

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17 hours ago, vince14 said:

But isn't that the beauty of aftermarket parts and decals? If someone finds building cockpits to be less than enjoyable, then it's a positive for them. If you're happy to scratchbuild for hours and hours to make your cockpits more realistic, then that's fine too.

 

There really is no right or wrong here - just whatever suits the individual.

 

And THIS actually is my point. :) 

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18 hours ago, thierry laurent said:

 

Well, each of us is using what he wants but I think stating that this requires no skill is a quick shortcut! I know tons of people who have issues with decals and as I wrote, whatever may be your skills, it is simply impossible to get similar results with painting, even in combination with Anyz decals. Moreover, some nice pit parts will not make a full model. So, wait and see.

 

Do not get me wrong, I fully got you point but as others have written, what about using wood propellers? Relying on aftermaket sets is typically asking for skills ONLY because many of those sets are simply not a drop-fit! When a modeller is using a wood propeller or a 3D-designed resin cockpit that is a drop fit, is he "cheating"? In that logic, we should say yes as he did not detail or rebuild the components himself! Another example: adding Flighpath photoetched PW exhausts on a 1/32 F-15 is a total nightmare few modellers went through whereas now we have drop fit gorgeous one part 3D-printed exhausts. This is just technical evolution and this will obviously decrease the amount of personal effort we must invest in building a model.

 

When I mentioned 3D printing, some may also consider this is somewhat "cheating" for the same reason. Indeed, this is asking for noticeable skills and experience but mainly for CAD skills and they are very far from traditional modelling ones! However, again, CAD and 3D printing allows to reproduce twenty times the same feature on a part whereas doing that manually is VERY difficult. So, they are a godsend and I'm always flabbergasted when I'm looking at what you're producing with them.

 

If we want to go to the extreme, each of us who's building a plane model from a kit is maybe cheating as, indeed, we could create everything from a block of wood! And then we arrive at the conclusion: what is good or fun for a modeller is not for another one! This is also why in correct contests, a fully scratchbuilt kit cannot compete against an OOTB one.

 

I think that multiplying the options and choice of aftermarket items is finally quite positive. I'm sure we will see many new products based on this type of technology in the future as we won't go against that evolution. And, to me, as far as this is giving a level of detail we cannot get with human skills, I'm satisfied even if detailing cockpits is one of my favorite modelling activities!

 

Injection-moulded models start as a 3D designs, just the same as a 3D-printed resin part, usually created in the same software. They are all 3D models, only the machine used to produce them is different. Using 3D-printed parts could be considered "cheating" only if you were scratch-building a model. You can use the same "cheating" argument on everything else, such as ready-mixed paints (you should mix your own paints starting with powder pigments and distil the suitable carrier), decals/masks (you should hand write every marking), adhesives (distil your own) and so on... :-) 

Radu 

 

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On 8/26/2020 at 1:19 AM, Starfighter said:

Looks really nice for sure, but we are getting to a point where modelling skills seem to be no longer needed... Researching and having fun painting a nicely detailed cockpit? Nah, just peel off the panels from their carrier film and stick them to the tub you've spent two minutes painting it grey. What's next? Pre-painted and weathered kit parts? 

 

Don't like it?  Don't use it. Problem solved. 

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Just a passing thought. I have always taken the view that unless you are crafting your parts from scratch from virgin plastic using original plans then you are an assembler not a modeller. So for the majority of us we simply choose to find ways to make our assembling more enjoyable, productive and pleasing to our eyes.

 

These look as if for many including me that they will raise the enjoyment level which is what a hobby is about.

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On 8/29/2020 at 12:02 PM, Jennings Heilig said:

Why do you need to act like that?  People can have opinions that differ from yours, and that’s okay.  No need to be a jerk about it.

I'm just pointing out that we all use different add-ons to improve our kits, but using them doesn't make you any less of a modeller. If you managed to read my follow-up post you would presumably have understood this.

 

 

 

Edited by LSP_Matt
Personal insults were removed
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On 8/26/2020 at 4:10 PM, thierry laurent said:

If we want to go to the extreme, each of us who's building a plane model from a kit is maybe cheating as, indeed, we could create everything from a block of wood!

Provocative debate, though I think Thierry got to the heart of the matter here. It's essentially a question of technological advances making models ever more realistic and detailed. Disallowing one technical advancement as too easy but accepting others  because they offer the same hyper-detail but are trickier to use just seems pretty arbitrary to me. 

 

No doubt when the first Revell and Airfix IM plastic kits were introduced there was the same reaction from wood kit modelers - - "it's too easy!" and "it's not real modeling!" Well today that's the benchmark, and we demand ever more accurate and well fitting kits (though I have seen some chivalrous modeling knights who scoff at demanding fit and accuracy as beneath them). 

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  • Jan_G changed the title to Quinta Studio - 3D printed interior for NEW P-51D, Su-25, F-16C

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