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curiouslysophie

Radar antenna arrangement on He-219

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2 hours ago, John1 said:

Yep but a simple coat of green would have sufficed.  Instead, Germans being Germans, they opted for time consuming, multicolor schemes that put additional strain on their failing supply and production capabilities.   Same applies to their armor.   They dutiful applied zimmerrit to all their tanks for a couple of years despite their being no magnetic mine threat.  Why?   Because it was in the specifications!   

 

 

Most camo was done at group or unit level so they could apply camo that worked with their location. That is why there is so much variation. Factories only did the basics. See the 262 thread with the pic of an unpainted 262 in delivery markings. Germans were way ahead of the Allies in camo theory.

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I think this discussion is straying a bit into clichés and memes. The reality of the fact, whether you like it or not, whether you believe it or not, continues to be that aircraft  were painted this way. They did not do this to annoy you. It was the fastest and most efficient way. Wanna lose your mind over this kind of stuff? Take the P-51 D Mustang. The wing was coated with the now-famous "putty and metalised lacquer" coating before the wing was attached to the fuselage. The fairings blending the wing to the fuselage were applied OVER this already painted wing. So, the Americans did the same thing as the Germans, i.e. they painted something that would never be seen. Why? Because it is the simplest, fastest and most efficient way to do it. 

Radu

Edited by Radub

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Here is a photo of the P-40. 

image015-721803.jpg

Note how the wing and fuselage were painted separately. Look at the fuselage in the area where the fuselage meets the wings. It is painted. After the wing and fuselage are joined, a fairing is bolted OVER the already painted area. So, the Germans were not the only ones who did that. 

Radu

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On 9/9/2019 at 2:03 PM, nmayhew said:

Rick Kranias is a member on here and he works at the museum in the US where they have the only He219 still in one piece (they are actually putting it together as we speak)

 

9947h.jpg?itok=L3NbWrNz

 

 

 

 

Having seen the plane myself up close, I most definitely agree with the light pattern over the darker surface. It is so painfully obvious. Running the paint job down the length of the fuselage rather than waste time masking off hidden areas makes sense as well up to a point.

 

I can't wait to see what you do with this build, and I can't wait to get back to D.C. sometime when the 1:1 is all assembled.

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4 hours ago, Padubon said:

This is quite funny. All of this yapping about who’s measuring stick was longer when the initial question is about a radar antena.

 

 

Haha, it did drift quite a way off! So much so I wandered off and started actually building some of my stash :P 

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17 hours ago, Gazzas said:

 

 

You can stop your ethnic bashing anytime.

Now that’s funny.  I’m part German.   I’ll be sure to self-loath if it makes amends for my insensitivity.  

 

Nowhere did I saw that obsessive attention to minute details was necessary a bad thing (except maybe during wartime I guess) and last time I checked, German car companies were using this trait in their ads to demonstrate their obsessive commitment to quality (I hope that’s not racial stereotyping, if so, please take it up with VW, BMW, etc).  

 

To further make amends, I’ll be sure to apologize to the first German I meet when I’m in Munich next month.   

 

We good now?  

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There is a photograph I remember seeing of a DH Mosquito production line with the entire wing assembly painted in camouflage before it had been installed on the fuselage.  As pointed out, not just Germany was at it.

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To get this thread back on track: for those interested, Chandos Publications has announced a new in-depth publication on the He 219 for late 2020, which is being billed as the 'ultimate' work on the type:

 

https://www.chandospublications.co.uk/heinkel-he-219-book-confirmed-for-late-2020/

 

Also, in addition to the titles mentioned earlier, there's Roland Remp's book:

 

Remp, R. 2000. Heinkel He 219: An Illustrated History of Germany's Premier Nightfighter. 160 pp. Schiffer Publishing, Atglen, PA.

Edited by pvanroy
Typo

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16 hours ago, Wegener said:

There is a photograph I remember seeing of a DH Mosquito production line with the entire wing assembly painted in camouflage before it had been installed on the fuselage.  As pointed out, not just Germany was at it.

 

The Mossie's airframe parts were coated in Madapolam cotton and then painted to make it taught, so painting added to the monocoque strength and assisted with keeping the weather and insects out. (Though Hatfield used formaldehyde glue as well.) 

 

I have the Revell '219 in the stash and eagerly await more pics from the recent full size splice in America, to better gauge the relative engine nacelle and fuselage datum lines.

 

The light paint squiggles over dark does look a daunting paint task. I'd be inclined to spray a mottle through a stencil and call it done. Looking at pics of late WW2 German aircraft, some mottling — whether commonplace or not — appears to be dabbed on with a sponge(s).

 

Tony

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25 minutes ago, pvanroy said:

To get this thread back on track: for those interested, Chandos Publications has announced a new in-depth publication on the He 219 for late 2020, which is being billed as the 'ultimate' work on the type:

 

https://www.chandospublications.co.uk/heinkel-he-219-book-confirmed-for-late-2020/

 

Also, in addition to the titles mentioned earlier, there's Roland Remp's book:

 

Remp, R. 2000. Heinkel He 219: An Illustrated History of Germany's Premier Nightfighter. 160 pp. Schiffer Publishing, Atglen, PA.

 

Thank you! The one for next year looks interesting. I’ll have to pick it up. The second one you mentioned is on my list of wanted books

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6 hours ago, esarmstrong said:

Anyone want to start a wish list?

 

Actually, sure....

 

The number one thing on my wish list...no more wish lists...

 

Mark Proulx

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On 9/10/2019 at 11:42 AM, bdthoresen said:

Sophie-

 

It was rumored that NJG3 (?) towards the end of hostilities had assembled four or five airframes from spares to keep the fight going. These few airplanes were unique in that they had no factory assigned Werk numbers, but they purportedly saw combat in the closing months of the war. Bit of Frankenstein’s monsters in a way. They were also field painted, and being that there is no known photos of them, it would be plausible to build one of these “ghost” aircraft. This was mentioned in more than one reference source.....I am away from my books at the mo......I have to have a gander when I get home, see what else I can dig up.

 

THOR    :ph34r:

 

THAT is hugely interesting. I helped pick the danish 219 out of the water some years ago, but noone has been able to establish a wnr for it. All of the machines listed in the LW documents are accounted for, so it had been speculated if it was a Heinkel test bird, also because it did not have a full armament aboard... perhaps it's one of those ?

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