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In COD we trust - Grumman C-2A Greyhound - scratchbuilt


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Cheers everyone! Since the Prowler is finished, I've been working on several projects in parallel. The carrier deck diorama is still in progress, I am working on my carrier deck vehicles, I am trying to finish Trumpeter's Super Hornet before the new Revell kit hits the market and the Hawkeye is back on the bench. The Viking has to wait until after Easter to get its milled wing center section.

 

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As I was planning to build the Hawkeye's closest relative since quite some time, I thought this could be the moment to start the Greyhound while finishing the E-2C. Thanks to my friend Thomas, I could get my hands on a Kinetic Greyhound to grab some dimensions and cross sections. I also have the old Warpaint drawings but I found these to be not as accurate as required. 

 

As usual, I made a skeleton in 3D and had the parts lasercut. Here is how the parts looked when I got them:

 

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And here is the assembled skeleton together with its brother. 

 

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I have already prepared quite a few parts for the Hawkeye which can be used on the C-2 as well such as seats, flaps and engine nacelles. I will buy another Tigger Models Hawkeye to get wings, fins and elevators. As usual, progress will be slow but hopefully steady.

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How do we bring a man on the Moon?

 

We break the whole issue down into a lot of small tasks and finish one job after another...

 

 

Go, Go, Go! :speak_cool:

 

 

BTW, how did you do the crossections and who made the lasercut?

 

Regards

- dutik

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Most of the cross sections come from the Kinetic kit as the Warpaint drawings were not convincing. I always have my parts cut by a shop in Aachen specialized in architectural modelling. This time, I have used 2mm cardboard as the parts are much more precise compared with PS parts (as the parts are laser cut, PS parts melt and have to reworked, resulting in slightly less precise parts). The skeleton you see in my first post has been assembled without glue.

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I know, I still owe you an RFI post for the Prowler - I initially wanted to wait until the deck is done but I might take a few photos within the next few weeks. I finished the model on time before the show in Belgium in mid December - I just need to add two more figurines.

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How do you transfer your crossections to the cutting process? Homemade CAD drawings? Paper templates? :hmmm:

 

And how much is it to get the parts for this build lasercut? Just to get an idea. :)

 

Regards

- dutik

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Cardboard...damn never thought of that one...how rigid is the frame comparable with styrene?? And when you say the cut styrene is off, could you not calculate that in with the start outlines? Or is that throwing it all too far off? Just asking how come you made the switch in medium....styrene sure worked well with your other projects thus far....

 

Going to look killer Ben

 

and by your title here's a little motivation LOL

 

 

Cheers

Frederick Jacobs

Edited by stusbke
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There are many ways to transfer the cross sections - it would be ideal to cut the kit into slices and scan each slice, but as it's not my kit, I have used a contour gauge and wire to transfer the cross sections. Having the parts cut costs around 20€. 

 

There is no way for me to calculate the deformation of PS under heat. In fact, I already used cardboard for the laser cut parts for my very first scratchbuilt model, the X-31 I have started years ago. After using PS for my Viking and Prowler, I'll give the cardboard another go.

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Thank you so far!

To be more precise: How did the lasercut shop get your data of "how to cut"? CAD file? Paper templates? Your own crosscut section drawings scanned by the shop and transferred into the lasercutter? :)

 

Contour gauges are great tools for modellers, indeed. I use wire too to get internal shapes like UC bays or the size of bulkheads.

 

Regards

- dutik

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