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Archer Fine Transfers

Do you wear progressive lens eyeglasses?

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I've been struggling with my eyesight for years and finally had cataract surgery which was a life altering event as far as I'm concerned. I opted for distance vision to be sharp and figured I'd just keep using reading glasses for close-up work, but what a PITA that is so I decided to get eyeglasses with progressive lenses.

 

When I had my eye exam the optometrist asked me how far I hold things when I read and prescribed lenses to that specification - +2 diopter. WRONG! I still needed reading glasses for close up work and the best for me is +3.25 diopter so I took my glasses back and told the optometrist that I wanted my near vision prescription changed from the +2 to +3.25. Despite her objections she changed the prescription. Now I never have to change eyeglasses for any reason, my closeup vision is good enough for any detail work.

 

CONCLUSION: If you wear progressive lenses insist that your near vision prescription matches the strength of the reading glasses or magnifier you use for modeling. 

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I've tried them twice, and either they mis-measured me, or I'm made weird (a distinct possibility), or something else was wrong.  Both times I was able to see fine with either eye closed, but when I opened both of them, I saw everything double.  They told me you have to get used to the progressive lenses, despite the fact that the first time around was my first go-around with bifocals, and that's supposed to make it easier.  I tried them for ten days, and had a headache the whole time, so I made them re-do them with regular lined lenses.  Same thing when I moved to trifocals.  I've decided I'm not that vain, and I don't care if anyone sees the lines in my lenses.  I can see fine with them like that.

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12 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

I've tried them twice, and either they mis-measured me, or I'm made weird (a distinct possibility), or something else was wrong.  Both times I was able to see fine with either eye closed, but when I opened both of them, I saw everything double.  They told me you have to get used to the progressive lenses, despite the fact that the first time around was my first go-around with bifocals, and that's supposed to make it easier.  I tried them for ten days, and had a headache the whole time, so I made them re-do them with regular lined lenses.  Same thing when I moved to trifocals.  I've decided I'm not that vain, and I don't care if anyone sees the lines in my lenses.  I can see fine with them like that.

 

Yea, the first time I wore progressives I almost fell down the stairs leaving the optometrist office. Suddenly my legs were a foot longer.

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I’m assuming progressives are the same as varifocals?  I wear them. Good for modelling and watching tv , but I preferred my single visions for driving.

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My primary care physician told me that the chance of misjudgment of distance or elevation is increased wearing bi or tri-focal lenses. Thus increasing the chance of falling. I have been using progressive lens glasses for a long period of time with no issues. 

Jager

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As I sit in front of a computer all day at work, I wear progressive "computer" glasses with two different magnifying powers. My eyes are not bad enough for Rx yet,  so these are just magnifiers and blue filters. I was getting headaches from not being able to focus on close up stuff. Works great for models, too!

 

Tim

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I need a pair of progressive lenses glasses or else I will need 2 pairs of glasses.

 

I am kind of creeped out by the idea of the progressive lenses and having to look through small portions of the lens for different tasks.

 

I'm glad to hear folks here have the progressive and have gotten used to them.

 

 

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I've worn them for 2-3 years now, and I have to confess that I'm still not really used to them, and don't really like them very much (technically, mine are progressive line-free multi-focals). The narrow band of specific focus means I'm constantly moving my head up and down to find the sharpest version of the thing I'm looking at, while most things remain slightly out-of-focus most of the time. I was told I'd get used to them very quickly, but that's not really the case for me, unfortunately. It's true that I don't notice them most of the time, and I have little useful close vision without them, but I never mastered them to the point of having them feel natural.

 

Kev

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18 hours ago, LSP_Kevin said:

I've worn them for 2-3 years now, and I have to confess that I'm still not really used to them, and don't really like them very much (technically, mine are progressive line-free multi-focals). The narrow band of specific focus means I'm constantly moving my head up and down to find the sharpest version of the thing I'm looking at, while most things remain slightly out-of-focus most of the time. I was told I'd get used to them very quickly, but that's not really the case for me, unfortunately. It's true that I don't notice them most of the time, and I have little useful close vision without them, but I never mastered them to the point of having them feel natural.

 

Kev

Hmm.  Well you've nicely laid out my worst fears! 

 

I have a pair that is set now for good long distance viewing, like driving or watching something at a theatre, etc.

 

I may get a different prescription for reading specifically.  If things at a distance get a little blurry, that's OK.

 

I spend most of my time during the day looking at a computer not too far in front of me, or building models with the same sort of vision requirements.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 7/14/2019 at 3:26 PM, Archer Fine Transfers said:

I've been struggling with my eyesight for years and finally had cataract surgery which was a life altering event as far as I'm concerned. I opted for distance vision to be sharp and figured I'd just keep using reading glasses for close-up work, but what a PITA that is so I decided to get eyeglasses with progressive lenses.

 

When I had my eye exam the optometrist asked me how far I hold things when I read and prescribed lenses to that specification - +2 diopter. WRONG! I still needed reading glasses for close up work and the best for me is +3.25 diopter so I took my glasses back and told the optometrist that I wanted my near vision prescription changed from the +2 to +3.25. Despite her objections she changed the prescription. Now I never have to change eyeglasses for any reason, my closeup vision is good enough for any detail work.

 

CONCLUSION: If you wear progressive lenses insist that your near vision prescription matches the strength of the reading glasses or magnifier you use for modeling. 

 

That is good advice.

 

I wear them (trifocals) and find myself using +4 readers for modeling work.

Edited by Ryan

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I had the same trouble as some of you with progressive lenses. There is only one small area that is actually in focus and your head has to move instead of moving your eyes. I couldn't do it and have gone to three sets of glasses.... one for distance, another bifocal for computer and close up work and a third set of distance prescription sunglasses to protect my eyes from damage whenever I am outside, as recommended by my eye doctor.

 

Another reason I hated progressive lenses was the fact that I couldn't use a telescope or microscope with them since almost nothing was in focus. I like astronomy and use a microscope to solder almost weekly if not daily at work. A good stereo microscope works wonders for small model parts as well.

 

No fun to get old,

 

Tnarg

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Posted (edited)

Well I suppose being qualified as an Optician, I should chime in.

 

Progressives, Varifocal's or PAL's etc have their place (I wear them myself)....however there are lots of variables as to why a progressive lens might not work.

 

1. Obviously if the lens hasnt been set up correctly on your face, then your eyes will never really be looking through the correct part of the lens. These lenses are set up at your pupil centre at your long distance prescription. The power of the lens increases as the prescription converges to shorten up your focal length for near at the bottom of the lens.  If the measurements are incorrect and/or they are sitting in the wrong place they will never be right and your brain will struggle to work binocularly etc.

 

2. New digital/Freeform technology works on 'as worn' measurements.  The lens is designed and calculated to 'work back' on where your eye rotates.  So if you sit your progressives on the end of your nose then you will never have good vision.

 

3. There are ALL SORTS of lens designs and technology, and some are more task specific if required. There are a lot of old, and poor designs out there in the market. At the very least you want to ask for new Freeform technology if you are considering getting some new lenses.  Not all progressives are the same as you can start to see.  Lots of companies design lenses, but few are good at actually producing good algorithms to  correct vision nicely.  My recommendation would be to ask your Optometrist/Optician the brand of lens you are getting.  Stick with the brands like Nikon, Hoya, Varilux, Zeiss etc.  These guys invest heavily into R&D (I know as I was trained by some R&D guys and spent time in Japan at an R&D lab).

 

I dont want to bore ya'll too much so I will stop there.  But remember that Progressives are a 'Jack of all trades' and even I have a set at my model desk for close work only.  One trick an old lens guy told me once was he sticks a pair of ready readers over the front of his progs near the end of his nose. His good lenses correct astigmatism etc, but because the progs have a smaller near part at the bottom, the RR boosts his workspace up....I tried it (it looks silly but it worked well)but I never said that LOL! 

 

I will say that Progressives are terrible for when I am working on my plane!!!  Trying to look up the top of my lens (because I cant move my head back 180 deg) at something close is a nightmare... Hence, I took them off, put my near glasses on, did the job.  When I stepped back to admire my work I stood on my frame and snapped the arm off GAH!!!

 

Good technology, set up well and you will never look back!  But never say never, in my experience some people just cant wear them, but they are few and are between.

 

HTH

Cheers

Anthony 

Edited by Anthony in NZ

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