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TorbenD

Armoured glass WW2 Fighters - Colour tint conundrum

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To tint or not to tint?

 

I’m wondering if anyone can offer some thoughts on the colour of armoured/buttlet-proof glass used in WW2 aircraft. Specifically whether or not there is a natural aqua/green/turquoise tinge that comes from the overall thickness and type of glass lamination used.

 

NB All images below are for illustrative purposes and intended to be under fair use - I will remove any that that accidentally do not comply: 

 

There’s plenty online images of Modern Warplanes where this is quite prominent. I’m using Spitfires mainly to illustrate this here as there are plenty of examples restored and original but my query is also aimed at all allied and Axis aircraft where armoured glass is used.

 

345E5E2C00000578-3598540-Ceremonial_The_08es09_008-M.jpgDSC_0826-M.jpgDSC_0819-S.jpg

 

But this colour tint seems either much diminished or non-existent on contemporary colour imagery. I believe the following are (hopefully) original colour images not re-coloured B/W

 

3dc595035a7feabbb3276847464640bf-S.jpg500e7de18f52d7dd8f5e5a941ad96de2-S.jpg3c06980fa16df913faf9359cc7b9cb23-L.jpg

 

Another example pertinent to my current build - I believe the below Airacobras should have armoured glass inside the windscreen and in the frame behind the pilot’s head - no sign of tinting at all...  

 

3404078-S.jpg

 

Any guidance / further info or ref gratefully received... 

 

Cheers,

Torben

 

 

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Torben,

     I cannot say that I have ever seen or read anything about tinted glass used in WWII aircraft in all of my years of studying the subject.

 

Gaz 

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14 minutes ago, Jennings Heilig said:

It wasn’t tinted, it’s just what you see with thick glass. Build what you see.

 

Agreed. I've seen both green and smoke versions.

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Thanks guys - in case of any confusion, I agree it’s a natural tinge (not applied tint) to some kinds of thick/laminated glass  - just wondering why that colouring is strong on some and non-existent on others. Different type of glass? Perhaps more modern (toughened?) glass has more of this hue in it? Perhaps different thickness/lamination processes?

 

Torben

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Green, especially a very light one as found in glass, is one of the most difficult colors for color photographic film to capture accurately. In the commercial photo-separation process, it was always easier to work with a photograph that had an excess of green/yellow and remove that excess than to add green/yellow to the image. Not that strange to see "neutral" armor glass in period photos that have been through several photo and copy processes.

 

HTH

 

D.B.

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I think in part the green color is due to thickness of the glass, and refraction of the light. I am sure impurities in the glass magnifies this. I also think some glass will darken with age.

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When i was in the army our APC's (432) had a little window in the rear door which had 7 panes of glass and that was very green, sodium based glass is the one that is not green. Notz do a series of thin tinted plexiglass and one of them is a dead ringer for green 'tinted' glass I have often thought if i was doing a spit in 1:24 i would use that for the front screen.

Graham

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Same here with soviet style APCs. We had side windows/vision slits covered with bulletproof glass. 5-7 layers of thick glass sheets in a solid frame. The glass was never tinted, only thick clear glass, but showed a slight green tinting. Remember that armored glass is often a layer of uncoated glass sheets, so there is a good amount of refraction effects between each successive layer.

 

Regards

- dutik

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