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1/32 MH-53E Sea Dragon - 3D printed / scratchbuilt

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10 minutes ago, Starfighter said:

 Pretty massive, I'd say... 

 

You can say that again :lol: It's a pitty your printer isn't up to the job. Good luck with the engines

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5 hours ago, Starfighter said:

Thanks for asking, Olivier! My little resin printer sadly cannot handle the sponsons properly, the parts are always slightly deformed - probably because they are too big. Tim aka Wunwinglow is so kind to print them for me on his Form 2, so (near) perfect parts will be available soon. In the meantime, I have made a little test with failed parts to see how it looks. Pretty massive, I'd say... 

 

61173156_2314002615284vkgq.jpg

 

The part is very dusty and the defects are obvious, but you get an idea of the surface detail. 

 

60753294_231400240528pbkuk.jpg

 

I am currently printing the engines; these are simple low res parts which will require a lot of work to obtain a perfect surface, but they should be a good base to work with. I will post a photo with the RH engine in place soon. 

So not only are you going to make a large scale stallion while you're at it opening up all the top panels....my kinda guy Keep m coming Ben...I can't wait to see this unfold...
Cheers Fred

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What panels do you mean, Fred? I'd like to open the center engine indeed but I am pretty sure this won't work with the rotor blades folded... Sea Dragon BTW! ;) 

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1 hour ago, Timmy! said:

 

Flew Ch-53E’s in the Marine Corps....whatcha got?

 

I was hoping you would answer! ;) I will definitely fold the rotor blades and tail but I would also like to open the no.2 engine bay. Because of the position of the rotor blades when folded, it seems to be rather improbable the engines - or at least #2 engine - is maintained with the blades folded. Am I right? Sadly, it is very difficult to find photos of folded MH-53E and even CH-53E with open panels (except the electronics compartment in the nose and below the cockpit). 

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Do any of these help Ben?

 

#2 engine change: https://www.dvidshub.net/image/2499263/vmm-162-replace-engine-ch-53e-super-stallion

engine maintenance: https://www.dvidshub.net/image/1325710/ch53e-super-stallion-engine-maintenance

 

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-us-marines-assigned-to-marine-heavy-helicopter-squadron-hmh-366-perform-129754722.html

 

https://www.alamy.com/150927-n-ug095-224-pacific-ocean-sept-27-2015-marines-conduct-maintenance-on-a-ch-53e-super-stallion-helicopter-attached-to-marine-heavy-helicopter-squadron-hmh-465-on-the-flight-deck-of-the-amphibious-assault-ship-uss-boxer-lhd-4-during-a-strait-transit-rehearsal-boxer-is-underway-off-the-coast-of-southern-california-conducting-routine-training-exercises-and-maintenance-in-preparation-for-its-upcoming-deployment-us-navy-photo-by-mass-communication-specialist-seaman-michael-t-eckelbeckerreleased-image215245687.html

 

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-pacific-ocean-calif-marines-conduct-maintenance-on-a-ch-53e-super-138371158.html?pv=1&stamp=2&imageid=DDABCFFF-C365-4E74-859C-64248BC487FD&p=370272&n=0&orientation=0&pn=1&searchtype=0&IsFromSearch=1&srch=foo%3dbar%26st%3d0%26pn%3d1%26ps%3d100%26sortby%3d2%26resultview%3dsortbyPopular%26npgs%3d0%26qt%3d15th%20marine%20expeditionaary%20unit%26qt_raw%3d15th%20marine%20expeditionaary%20unit%26lic%3d3%26mr%3d0%26pr%3d0%26ot%3d0%26creative%3d%26ag%3d0%26hc%3d0%26pc%3d%26blackwhite%3d%26cutout%3d%26tbar%3d1%26et%3d0x000000000000000000000%26vp%3d0%26loc%3d0%26imgt%3d0%26dtfr%3d%26dtto%3d%26size%3d0xFF%26archive%3d1%26groupid%3d%26pseudoid%3d%26a%3d%26cdid%3d%26cdsrt%3d%26name%3d%26qn%3d%26apalib%3d%26apalic%3d%26lightbox%3d%26gname%3d%26gtype%3d%26xstx%3d0%26simid%3d%26saveQry%3d%26editorial%3d1%26nu%3d%26t%3d%26edoptin%3d%26customgeoip%3d%26cap%3d1%26cbstore%3d1%26vd%3d0%26lb%3d%26fi%3d2%26edrf%3d%26ispremium%3d1%26flip%3d0%26pl%3d

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikorsky_CH-53E_Super_Stallion#/media/File:CH-53E_Engine_Details.jpg

 

195294-P-UOR35-506.jpg

 

170808-F-CN368-204.JPG

 

rotorhead06.jpg

 

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This answer is a usual case, there are exceptions.  There are two times the blades are folded, to fit in a hanger or to store in the 

“bone” (the parking area on a ship).  The folding operation is complicated in the sense that, there are a lot of things that can go wrong and can cause damage.  Folding the blades required many eyes watching the operation to ward off mistakes.  As a rule of thumb, because the 53 is so complicated, if operation is not necessary it’s not done to keep things from breaking.  Keep in mind the MH squadrons are shore based, they generally don’t deploy on ship, Marines however do, and can get very quick at folding up blades and tail, especially when on work ups or deploying on a ship.  Therefore, I suspect you’d see far fewer MH’s folded than CH’s.  Folding is most common on a ship and panels are definitely not left open in that environment.  On shore they are folded for storage and not left open either.  If the aircraft are in the hanger for heavy maintenance, the blades are very often removed entirely.  

 

It would be a rare case to see a bunch of panel open with the blades folded.  However, the #2 engine and oil cooler, platforms can be lowered, and the upper doors opened for pre-flight inspection.  You can open the dog house above the cockpit and the #1 and #3 engines no sweat.  As an aside, it was a true joy on preflight to walk the spine to inspect the tail rotor while the ship was underway and the tail hanging over the catwalks and water....not.

 

in general, thing aren’t left open unless active maintenance is going on. Although it was common for an aircraft to be on the line with all 3 engine compartments, dog house, oil cooler and #1 and #3 EAPS open by a motivated crew chief who has his aircraft ready for the pilots to conduct their preflight.  This courtesy was usually held for the CO or Maintenance Officer or pilots in good standing with the Flight-line shop.  Blades spread and untied of course.....

 

Hope that helps,

Timmy!

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Thanks a lot Mike and Timmy for the photos and detailed information! I already had most of the photos and indeed none of them shows engine #2 open with the blades folded. My guess would have been that engine maintenance would probably happen in the hangar deck when the aircraft is deployed which would mean folded or removed blades, just as described by Timmy. Then, I am pretty sure the #2 engine side door forming the platform when lowered would interfere with the folded blades.

 

Folded blades are mandatory for me because of several reasons - it's a typical feature of naval aircraft which I like to show, it adds a lot of interest and maybe even more obvious - it saves a lot of space.  

 

If I open panels, there will be carrier deck personnel and plane captains around and on the aircraft. The large electronics bays below the cockpit seem to be open on a regular basis when the aircraft is parked; the dog house would certainly add a lot of interest.

 

Then, another question - sorry to bother you with more... Are all three sand filters identical? After some research, I could't find any drawings - is there something available I could use to draw detailed sand filters in 3D? 

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6 hours ago, Starfighter said:

Then, another question - sorry to bother you with more... Are all three sand filters identical? After some research, I could't find any drawings - is there something available I could use to draw detailed sand filters in 3D? 

 

Those are called EAPS, Engine Air Particle Separator.   (Pronounced “eeps”). Yes all identical.  They unlatch at the rear and swing forward to allow engine intake inspection.

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The Picture of the mechanic sitting on the door and the milky substance flowing down the fuselage.....that is an engine flush, the milky stuff is called gas-path and cleans the the turbine blades and guide vanes inside the engine.  We did the same thing on our AH-1's.  Gas-path, if not washed off, will stain CARC paint.....it makes a heavy faded color, very light base color if you will.

 

Great pictures BTW, I can almost smell the sweet smell of hydraulic fluid, oil and JP-8........

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