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THE SHARK HAS LANDED! Curtiss Tomahawk 112sqn RAF


quang

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55 minutes ago, Neo said:

Cant believe that the wings and fuselage where painter before assembly!!! The camo matches up great and there are no seam, glue marks or anything :o

 

Since extra thin doesn't like painted surfaces what did you use to glue the wing on? How do you avoid seeping glue and marks on the paint? 

 

Your build looks amazing

My fellow modellers always make fun of me when I say that the first thing I do even before cutting off the sprues is to put a quick coat of Gunze Surfacer 1200 overall.

Many reasons to that:

1- I hate touching bare plastic 

2- the coat of primer covers the translucence of the styrene and reveals the true quality (and flaws) of the mouldings.

3- while protecting the styrene from one’s sweaty handling, the cellulose-based primer allows the styrene cement (thin and thick) to get through and take effect. Furthermore the styrene cement doesn’t have much effect on the primer and leaves no trace IF you leave it untouched, so lesser risk of seeping glue.


Another tip is HOW you apply the extra-thin glue. Don’t follow the seams with the application brush but touch just one spot on the seam and let the cement take its course.

One more thing: lately I re-discovered the humble TUBE CEMENT. It takes longer to harden and gives you more time to adjust, especially when you’re dealing with large assemblies like fuselage halves or wing's.
As a matter of fact, I rarely glue a large assembly in one go. I divide the long seam into smaller segments and do it step by step, segment after segment.

I never use clamps or rubber bands to hold the parts together. I do it with my fingers so that I could control the pressure between the parts.


<Cant believe that the wings and fuselage where painter before assembly!!!>
Give the credit to GWH engineering and moulding.
In fact the kit is designed as in the actual assembly line at the Buffalo plant where the aircraft was built in sections, each section finished, painted and crated and shipped to the front. Hence the mismatch between the camouflage patterns found on several contemporary photographs.

On the model, I did try to create such a mismatch on some areas like the rudder and elevators.

 

Thank you all for your interest,

Cheers,

Quang

 

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Posted (edited)

Just one more thing before the Curtiss experts scold me.

 

A long-time IPMS friend gave me an OOP Barracudals sheet about the 112sqn Tomahawk.
While I have no use for it, I found the Curtiss logo on the propeller blade rather engaging while missing in the GWH boxing. I added them to my build but cannot prevent an uneasy feeling.

Until a while ago, I decided to check: there was NO Curtiss logo on the export H81s. So I quickly removed them.

 

SAVED BY THE BELL!

 

Before…

321838-FE-0-D2-E-4-A26-A108-12-D9244-BC9

 

 

After…
DAD956-B9-4939-41-C4-B4-F6-9-B1-BE5-A2-F

 

Cheers,

Quang

Edited by quang
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Thank you @Madmax for the kind words.

Curiously this is the very first time in my modelling ‘career’ that I have patience enough to deal with weathering.
All my other builds stopped short after the model is painted and decaled mostly because I spent so much time correcting and adding details that I got fed up at the end.

In this case here with the GWH kit verging on perfection, I thought I’d push the envelop a bit further … and so far I like it very much! :innocent:
Thank you all for your interest,

Cheers,

Quang

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a small mistake, on H81/P40 the blade markings were stenciled in white

on the blade and not yellow as later and the text is left justified only

 

great job as I have rarely seen

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Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, waroff said:

a small mistake, on H81/P40 the blade markings were stenciled in white

on the blade and not yellow as later and the text is left justified only

 

great job as I have rarely seen

I knew it. I just thought hoped you won’t :P

Edited by quang
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10 hours ago, Kaeone57 said:

GWH seems to have done a great job on their kit and I can see you are enjoying it, Quang.

Indeed Alfonso. I rarely had so much fun with a model kit and it’s NOT over yet! :P
 

Some more progress with the EXHAUST STAINS

Note that they come in 2 distinct types:

1- heat stains shown by paint discolouration next to the exhaust pipes

2- smoke trails which are generally subjected to propeller wash. Characteristically they are not the same on RH and LH sides. Furthermore on the early Hawks, they don’t coincide with the whitish heat stains.

 

73-B2837-D-4455-499-D-BC59-BFA978-FFD633


480564-C8-973-E-4-CFE-9-DD0-9-F2-B56-DCF


Note how the smoke trail on the LEFT side is pointing upwards …
8-D63659-B-CE5-E-4-ECD-AA05-E427-D6-B343

 

… while it’s going down on the RIGHT side. This effect is caused by the wind created by the propeller turning in one direction (prop wash).
D0257945-137-D-4777-86-F6-2-BEA6-AF834-B


When one thinks ‘exhaust stains’, we automatically think ‘airbrush’. In fact it’s much easier to replicate with a paint brush because we have more control.. This is how I did it.

 

This is my oils palette for the whole build. For the exhaust trails, I only used sepia, ochre and a bit of Payne’s Gray. 

0340-EBCE-CA0-A-460-F-BBDA-0867-EBD472-B
 

Sepia and ochre are applied in tiny dots along the trail
D2-C780-A0-9-A9-C-4-E46-9-E3-B-70-FE93-B


Blend with a flat soft brush in up-and-down strokes
EA9-C1-CF4-7293-481-F-908-B-92486-AADACE


More blending with a softer brush 
4-B4-C7294-23-F7-40-C1-A51-C-DF58-E05-BA

 

Add more dots to deepen the effect
C79685-F2-0-F75-4-B44-82-DC-66-E564-C459

 

The result

93-F9-B975-8-F43-4054-B524-991-F81-BFEFB

 

Time to call it a day.

Any questions, comments etc…

Have a glorious Sunday,

Cheers

Quang

 

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56 minutes ago, Neo said:

when your blending do you use thinners on your brush? Is yes what time and how wet? 

As you can see on the first picture, I put a dab of oil paint on a piece of paper, wait a few minutes for the extra oil to ooze out and it’s ready to use.
It should have the consistency of melted butter. Use it like you would butter a slice of bread, with a spreading motion, The further you spread, the thinner and more transparent the oil paint will be. 
Drying time depends on the thickness of the paint coat. Thicker coats dry longer.  For the exhaust stains, leave it overnight after which you can add another coat.
As a rule thinner like turpentine will break down the molecular structure of the oil paint making it ‘weaker’ and desaturated. Use thinner only to wash your brushes after use.

HTH

Q

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I appreciate your photos and description of the exhaust staining, I really like the effects you have achieved with your method.  I will be trying this one out as I love using oils for weathering effects whenever possible.

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31 minutes ago, quang said:

As you can see on the first picture, I put a dab of oil paint on a piece of paper, wait a few minutes for the extra oil to ooze out and it’s ready to use.
It should have the consistency of melted butter. Use it like you would butter a slice of bread, with a spreading motion, The further you spread, the thinner and more transparent the oil paint will be. 
Drying time depends on the thickness of the paint coat. Thicker coats dry longer.  For the exhaust stains, leave it overnight after which you can add another coat.
As a rule thinner like turpentine will break down the molecular structure of the oil paint making it ‘weaker’ and desaturated. Use thinner only to wash your brushes after use.

HTH

Q

Are there any concerns with the oil paint reacting with the base colors?   Will this work with all paints?  

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38 minutes ago, John1 said:

Are there any concerns with the oil paint reacting with the base colors?   Will this work with all paints?  

No problem with water-base paints (Vallejo, Tamiya,…).

I used oils over AK Real Color and Gunze Mr Color in my current build, so no concern whatsoever with lacquers.
There can be some issue with enamels if you use THINNED oils because the turpentine can lift the enamel base.

 

In any case, you can protect your base with an ever thin coat of gloss or matt varnish.

Furthermore it will help you choose the adherence of your base support. Some prefer a matt base because it ‘grips’ the oils better. Others like a gloss base because they like their oils to flow. Myself for some reason, I never could get a real gloss coat. The best I can achieve is satin. So I guess I’m middle-ground :P
 

1 hour ago, Daywalker said:

I appreciate your photos and description of the exhaust staining, I really like the effects you have achieved with your method.  I will be trying this one out as I love using oils for weathering effects whenever possible.

Glad I could help. Let us know how it turns out.

 

Cheers,

Quang

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  • quang changed the title to THE SHARK HAS LANDED! Curtiss Tomahawk 112sqn RAF

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