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CO2 airbrushing dangers

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I know this has been discussed before, but I can't find it, but what dangers are there when airbrushing using CO2?

If you have a vented booth, will their still be the dangerous air everyone claims?

Is it safe to have a small electric heater on while airbrushing? If not, how long will you have to wait to turn it back on?

Thanks!

Tim

 

 

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Hi Tim,

 

I think you may have a slightly crossed wire. Carbon Dioxide is an asphyxiant (ie it displaces oxygen), but it is not flammable. Carbon Monoxide on the other hand is both toxic (it binds to the haemoglobin in your blood - it is a reversible reaction but the half life is quite long) and flammable. Carbon monoxide is generally made during poor combustion, but you have neither in what you describe.

 

As long as the space is well ventilated there is unlikely to be any issues with you using the CO2 for airbrushing, you should be fine. The heater will not be an issue.

 

As always, treat compressed gases with respect.

 

Brendan

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You won't be able to use enough volume of CO2 while airbrushing to pose a danger unless the room is hermetically sealed and you have a very large tank of it and leave it open. CO2 is the fizz in soda and an ingredient in fire extinguishers. With a vent fan? No worries whatsoever.

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Keep in mind that CO2 is the principal out-gas product of humans and mammals.  It sinks lower than O2 and as mentioned above in concentration will displace O2 - that's the danger but good ventilation will solve that issue.  I've used compressed CO2 for airbrushing for years and over time,  my friends have not noticed any abhorrent behavior in me (I do wonder about them sometimes).

 

---Thanks Astro32 for the correction - maybe too much co2 afterall!!!

Edited by Gene
mistake in outgas, thanks Astro32

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It's not the CO2 you need to worry about, it's the atomised paint particles getting into your lungs which cause the problems - that's why you should always wear a proper mask when airbrushing (and a helpful hint: if you can smell paint through your mask whilst airbrushing, your mask isn't stopping the paint particles).

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1 hour ago, Radub said:

Why use CO2? Airbrush compressors can be purchased at reasonable prices, often cheaper than some of the kits we build here. :-) 

Radu 

 

If you'd ever used it you wouldn't even have to ask that question.  I've wasted my last dollar on a compressor.  I'd never go back after converting to CO2.

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2 minutes ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

I've wasted my last dollar on a compressor.

 

I never wasted money on a compressor. I used to make my own compressors using fridge pumps. I only had two commercially-built compressors and they were worth their weight in gold. 

Radu 

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The only danger from a CO2 bottle tipping over is if you happened to knock the regulator off - which isn't easy.  Just turning it over onto its side does absolutely nothing.  It might make a lot of noise, but it's not dangerous.  If you *did* somehow manage to knock the regulator off,  you'd have a rocket jetting around your work room, which could be dangerous :)

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1 hour ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

If you'd ever used it you wouldn't even have to ask that question.  I've wasted my last dollar on a compressor.  I'd never go back after converting to CO2.

 

Same here. I've been using 20lb CO2 tanks for many years now, and will never buy another hobby compressor.

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26 minutes ago, LSP_Typhoonattack said:

 

Same here. I've been using 20lb CO2 tanks for many years now, and will never buy another hobby compressor.

 

I use a shop compressor.  It's a wee noisy and not overly expensive.  Hobby compressors are too weak.  I'd never buy another.  But I don't think I could fill my tires with a CO2 cylinder.

 

Gaz

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Thanks guys for all the comments. I don't get much time to model, so I bought a 4 pound tank. I built a tank mount bracket at work and secured it to my workbench leg. Just need to get a spray booth and vent it to my window. 

Colopaint-Airbrush-Brand-Portable-Hobby-

That's my next purchase.

 

Tim

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