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mark31

vac form help needed

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im thinking to go for a vac form again

but i whant to do i difrent then what i have done with my E-2c

 

I know i need a lot of info about what to build but that is coverd

now what do you use to mesure the curves for the bulkhaeds in the fuselage?

 

Do you make them in one piece?

 

Any info will be good

 

thanks Mark

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9 hours ago, mark31 said:

now what do you use to mesure the curves for the bulkhaeds in the fuselage?

The quickest, easiest and cheapest way to accurately duplicate the curves for bulkheads is to use a Contour Gauge:

https://www.amazon.com/Tile-Solutions-2542-Contour-Gauge/dp/B0011UH03S

 

The one at the link is just an expedient example. You should be able to find one locally. 

 

As far as one or two piece bulkheads, that's entirely up to you and what you think would work best for each individual bulkhead.

 

HTH,

D

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A couple of tricks to consider for cross section shapes:

use your contour gauge but transfer the shape to graph paper with 0.1 inch grid.  Work to make the center line of the shape parallel to a line on the paper.  Fold the graph paper and cut the shape.  Both sides will be symmetrical.  Use the paper "doll" to test fit quickly.  Refine as necessary by tracing the first attempt on graph paper again.  The eye will have a reference point so you can sketch the improved shape.  Fold and cut.  Glue the pattern to sheet plastic with water soluable glue.   Remove the paper before gluing (or not).

 

To help to ensure that the bulkhead is straight, glue a a narrow strip perpendicular to the flat surface, around the circumference of the part.  Essentially this makes a dish increasing the surface area available to glue the part. The part is more likely remain perpendicular to the fuselage at the glue point for example.    I also do this to avoid super glue on styrene kits.  There is more surface area.

 

Rick

 

 

 

 

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Look at this build thread...

http://www.ipmsdeutschland.de/Flugzeuge/Gaeste/Wolf_Catalina.html

Halfway down the page is a reference drawing of how the guy does his bulkheads.

 

As each half of the model may not be symmetrical, he does the same process to each side.  I have done this a few times myself, but never for a full model.   After drawing your location reference line on the inside of the fuselage, begin tacking the little tiles of plastic with elmers style white glue, or other strong alphatic type craft glue.  Water soluble.   Modge Podge is very thick and tacky. As the tiles overlap, glue those to each other with CA or liquid cement etc.  Just be careful not to glue them to the fuselage.  Once your chain of tiles is glued together and dry, simply wet the white glue to release it from the fuselage.  Now you have a very accurate interior gauge outline taht will require very little trimming and sanding to snug.

 

Tip... cutting the tiles longer makes them easier to handle and glue together.  On tight curves, you will want narrower tiles to keep the curve accurate.  

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5 hours ago, Shawn M said:

Im thinking about pouring plaster into the fuse halves to get accurate shape. Then cutting the plaster where I need to make a bulkhead

 

I've heard about that technique being used. If you try it out, please report back!

 

Kev

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The concept sound great and quite straightforward, Kevin. The reality for me was that once you have the plaster plug, you need to mark the exact location of the bulkhead on it, then saw/sand in the proper plane. Once you have that done, it's a simple matter to glue a piece or styrene sheet to it. If the interior surface doesn't change "diameter", it's not too bad.  It was just a PITA for my ham fists. It was a long time ago too. I'd like to think my skills have improved since then.

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I've been using a profile gauge for many years and with great success. It's pretty fool-proof to be honest, and once the bulkhead is cut out, only requires very minor trimming or sanding to get a nice snug fit. The problems start when the fuselages are not moulded symmetrically, which is often the case with the lesser-quality vacforms... Combat Models... :blink:

 

Tom 

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2 hours ago, tomprobert said:

I've been using a profile gauge for many years and with great success. It's pretty fool-proof to be honest, and once the bulkhead is cut out, only requires very minor trimming or sanding to get a nice snug fit. The problems start when the fuselages are not moulded symmetrically, which is often the case with the lesser-quality vacforms... Combat Models... :blink:

 

Tom 

Oh dear, my Anson and Cornell are both Combat Models.  The most obvious "poor quality" aspect of them is the rudimentary undercarriage legs, but I've not yet joined either one's fuselages.  There could be trouble ahead.......

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I've got the Combat Models 1/48 PBM, itching to dive into it too.

 

Paul Budznik did a great video on how to make bulk heads using plaster.

Let me see if I can find it...

 

nope, maybe it wasn't Paul

Edited by Shawn M

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