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D Bellis

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D Bellis last won the day on May 28 2015

D Bellis had the most liked content!

About D Bellis

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    SE CT, USA
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    Way too many to list here!

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  1. Nope. There's no way to collect that data accurately. Even data for extremely rare, highly desirable, big dollar cars rely on their owners entering their car's information into databases known as "registries", and even then only about a third or less of the cars that are still registered or in museums end up in the database. A starting point would be that there were just over 33,000 Darts produced in 1969. Four-doors would make up the lion's share of that number, with the rarest being the 640 M-Code 440 Dart GTS models that were built. D
  2. Production number, yes. But not an accurate number of cars still in existence. With the push-button shifter, those were very likely "poly" 318s that had nothing in common with the later LA 318 engines (other than displacement). The push-button thing went away (1965?) around the same time period that the LA engines were introduced (1967 for the LA 318). D
  3. In that case, my advice would be to preserve it, as-is, from the carb right down to the hubcaps. Any alterations would only degrade its value and the appreciation of fellow enthusiasts. JMHO, D
  4. Speaking from 1st hand experience, the value of a 4-door is $0, except for parts (V8 K Member, entire front clip, some of the interior, deck lid, etc.). Although, there's niche market with college kids that just want to be seen in old cars. My two Darts (both 340 cars)... 1968 GTS: 1970 Swinger: I still have the '70 that I bought back in 1995. The '68 was sold a few years ago to help pay for my '69 Super Bee restoration. Good luck with the '69. D
  5. Brass shim-stock sheet is available down to .0005" (.013mm) thick. It's easy to work with and cuts with regular scissors, yet is fairly strong considering the thickness. HTH, D
  6. An English language review of this sander: D
  7. I believe Troy is referring to the fact that both of 909's pilots were in their '70s at the time of the crash. HTH, D
  8. Jerry Rutman produced an SBD kit? D
  9. After perusing the Smith & Creek volumes, I did not find a definitive answer. For photographed aircraft in the 170xxx range, I found that 170071, 170083 and 170120 had the early, fared-over position light at the base of the rudder. However, 170070 (earlier than the other three) had the later teardrop position light. If I were to draw a conclusion, I would think that the change took place haphazardly early in the 170xxx production block, and/or early aircraft were fitted with later rudders in the field (possibly as replacement parts?). As always, refer to photos of the actual machine in question. HTH, D
  10. To eliminate the need to go on an Easter Egg Hunt looking elsewhere for what has been mentioned in this thread thus far: And from the Hartford Courant: https://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-news-faa-says-collings-foundation-cannot-carry-passengers-20200325-twq2alj7i5gztllf6h4p22mjyi-story.html D
  11. The standard rudders were metal. Only some very late rudders were wood (along with the entire tail section), which was identifiable by the unique, hard-edge squiggle camo as commonly seen on the Kommando Nowotny Me 262s. No Me 262 control surfaces were open-frame with fabric covering. I'll have to dig through the Smith & Creek volumes for the W.Nr. or production block when the light changed. Hopefully, someone will beat me to it... HTH, D
  12. There used to be a Black Box cockpit available for the Trumpeter SBD kits. But, it really wasn't needed, and apparently wasn't popular enough to keep it in production. Being a Trumpeter kit, the tires are that vinyl material which (IMHO) need to be replaced. The only option there are the Master Casters wheels, which are sometimes difficult to find due to sporadic/unreliable production. HTH, D
  13. D Bellis

    Boxart

    This is my all-time favorite: Although, I'm also quite fond of Revell's original P-51B artwork in Gentile's markings, and of course their Snake Stuka. D
  14. Agent K said it best: No matter what the latest general public trend happens to be, it can always be explained by that statement. D
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