Jump to content

Late War RLM usage of 81/82, etc.


Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...

Hint : Those interested in research on german paint industry during WW2 that can read german and have access to the Bundesarchivs should go there and search for the material regarding a company called "Deutsche Revisions- und Treuhand AG".

 

It will open a whole new world into german aircraft production and its sub contractors.

 

;)

 

Vincent

Edited by Vincent/MDC
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Vincent/MDC said:

Hint : Those interested in research on german paint industry during WW2 that can read german and have access to the Bundesarchivs should go there and search for the material regarding a company called "Deutsche Revisions- und Treuhand AG".

 

It will open a whole new world into german aircraft production and its sub contractors.

 

;)

 

Vincent

 

Werde es am WE mal angreifen... ;-)

 

Danke und Gruss

Uwe

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Don't know if you guys have seen this but it's an interesting article over on HS about paint used on the Do335.   According to the info in the article, when they made the transition from 70/71 to 81/82, it was specified that any remaining stocks of the older paints could be added to the new equivalents to maximize the inventories of these paints. 

 

worth a read...

 

http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/do335camomu_1.htm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Note that the paints were not mixed, i.e., blended  together, but  used in conjunction with one another; 71 could be substituted for 82 and 70 for 81. Thus the following combinations were permissible 70/82 and 71/81.

 

The RLM had directed that  stocks of RLM 70 and 71 to be used up before the new colors were employed, but recognized in some instances the manufacturer would be left with a residual stock of one of the two colors.   

Edited by RBrown
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

"Stocks" is a relative concept as the paint was more or less delivered on contract basis. Quite close to the "just in time" of today's industry.

 

So stocks would have probably not covered more than a dozen a/c (depending on the a/c size) at the time of transition

 

V

Edited by Vincent/MDC
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Guest DeanKB

It's funny how Germany was getting bombed into oblivion, squeezed from west, south, north and - especially - east, with food in short supply, deaths mounting, new pilots having a few hours training,  the country being inevitably overrun underneath the Soviet hordes - and yet the German bureaucracy still got arsey about what colour to paint the aircraft that were going to invariably be shot down in a matter of days.

 

I'm not sure it mattered much what colours were used. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, DeanKB said:

It's funny how Germany was getting bombed into oblivion, squeezed from west, south, north and - especially - east, with food in short supply, deaths mounting, new pilots having a few hours training,  the country being inevitably overrun underneath the Soviet hordes - and yet the German bureaucracy still got arsey about what colour to paint the aircraft that were going to invariably be shot down in a matter of days.

 

I'm not sure it mattered much what colours were used. 

 

This is called insight

 

But the bureaucracy was more important than ever at the end of the war because it meant that whoever was operating it wasn't facing the russians with a Panzerfaust.

 

It was something that puzzled me for a while and it was explained to me by a famous german pilot who surrendered to the allied in May 45. He basically said that as long as the LW existed, even on paper, the pilots and mechanics were not called to serve as infantry. So they took extreme measures to report activity to the HQ and request new a/c even when they had no pilots and fuel to fly them.

 

Because to them it had been clear for at least 6 months that the reich was finished and they were mainly concerned in staying alive and be captured by the allies

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Given that the Luftwaffe did fly missions to the very end, and that the personnel was transferred to the infantry... 

 

Total breakdown only occurs when you get no orders from the top. Until then machinery turns and work is done, regardless of the situation. A similar case is ceasefires. War continues up until the agreed point, strange as it seems. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...