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Cheetah11

Galland's Bf 109 E-4

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I am looking at doing a 1/48 Hasegawa 109 E-4 and in Galland's markings during Sept 1940.(Can't find a 1/32 kit for the group build in the time left)

 

The kit instructions and some other sources give the colors as 74,75 and 65. Surely at the time it would have been 02, 71 and 65 or did he have an experimental cammo scheme?

 

Thanks

 

Nick

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Galland had two machines , W. Nr. 5819 and W. Nr. 6714, at the time.  Both machines carried the same markings.  Galland was asked at a seminar about the colors but stated that he did not remember.  His former chief mechanic was also present and advised that Galland's aircraft were camouflaged with gray paint but did not elaborate.

Edited by RBrown

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Hi Nick, it is possible, though highly unlikely the either of Galland's aircraft that he used during the Battle of Britain had the 74,75, 65 scheme.  Official instructions to change to that exterior camo scheme were not issued by the Luftwaffe administration until Nov 41.  Again, it is possible that RLM 74 and 75 were being experimented with during the BoB timeframe, but it is unlikely that is so.  A plausible explanation for the Hasegawa color scheme is that RLM 74 can look a lot like RLM 71 depending on such factors as how the light is striking the painted surface, the amount of wear the painted surface has had and where a particular RLM color was mixed; all of which can effect the color tone.  There is nothing absolutely definitive when it comes to RLM colors and how/when they were applied however; so you could justifiably use 74/75 and explain it as one of Galland's innovations along with the forward canopy mounted telescope and ashtray in the cockpit!

 

Ernest   

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21 hours ago, RBrown said:

Galland had two machines , W. Nr. 5819 and W. Nr. 6714, at the time.  Both machines carried the same markings.  Galland was asked at a seminar about the colors but stated that he did not remember.  His former chief mechanic was also present and advised that Galland's aircraft were camouflaged with gray paint but did not elaborate.

 

And it is proven scientific fact that the human memory is almost completely incapable of remembering color, or subtleties of color, even when someone actively *tries* to remember color.  Numerous studies have proven it.

 

Which is why I laugh when people say “Yeah, but the crew chief said it was...”   The aircraft I soloed in in 1980 was a 1978 Cessna 172N, registered N128ER.  Ask me precisely what color it was inside or out.  Not a clue.  I know the ERAU fleet scheme was basic white with blue trim, but that’s all I can tell you.

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Posted (edited)

 

Thanks for the photos gentleman.

 

There is a lot of information I can use which is a little different from the accepted modeling practices.  Maybe more time for cleaning and maintenance during the early war years. 

 

The nose cowl is a lot dirtier than I would have expected yet the wings are covered with tarpaulins  during cleaning and maintenance leading to most likely very little scuff marks in that area.

 

The fitter seems to be cleaning the side of the fuselage and little exhaust residue is visible.

 

Panel lines and rivets are fairly subdued and the markings are not nearly as crisp and defined as modern decals would portray.

 

The canopy frame is also interesting. As Mike has observed maybe 66 or maybe 70.

 

Thanks again for the info.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Cheetah11
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1 hour ago, Mark P said:

Be aware the last color photo in this thread is colorized. 

 

Mark Proulx

 

 

Correct.  You can draw absolutely no conclusions on the colors of the real thing from that picture.    Still a nice job, nonetheless. 

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Another thing to remember when constructing an aircraft flown by Galland, or any other leading ace for that matter, is that his/their aircraft very likely received more tender loving care than a fighter flown by Joe Nobody meaning it, again generally, looked a bit less beat up.  During the BoB timeframe, and for a couple of months afterwards, German JG operated from forward base, very often from grass fields with little to no permanent maintenance structures; and several of the JG had gotten very little break after the Battle of France was completed.  So their aircraft were more worn than say later in the war when the JG in the west mostly operated from established airfields.  Gives us modelers a lot of latitude when it come to weathering.

 

Ernest

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Jerry Crandall has asked Galland  about it back in their meetings,  he said  that he order himself to paint  his aircraft in the grey scheme because he spent more time over the Channel, Jerry is  a member of this forum  would be great to hear his account,  I made a comparison with my 74/75//6 relics and the only color picture of Galland's aircrafts can see clearly a 75 grey violet on the fuselage, cheers

Screenshot-3479.png

 

73257864-2393143450924570-27872916116865

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