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WINGNUT WINGS LANCASTER!!!!!!!!!

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1 minute ago, 19squadron said:

I rekonit will totally eclipse Tamiya, who will be left looking like yesterdays  game.

I refer the right honourable gentleman to my previous statement.

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55 minutes ago, 19squadron said:

I rekonit will totally eclipse Tamiya, who will be left looking like yesterdays  game.

If WNW wanted to Eclipse Tamiya in the world of 1/32 airplanes they could.  I don’t think they will choose to do so though.  Their is no indication that this is anything more than a dalliance with WWII and they will stay with WWI.  They are also not going to venture into the other things Tamiya does.  

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Can you imagine if all of these guys who build 1/32 4-engined bombers bring their creations into competition at the same time...  You might fit only 3 on a standard 8-foot table.  You wouldn't want any overhang lest a clumsy person drift too near and catch a wingtip with a shirttail and bring them all crashing to the floor.

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11 hours ago, 19squadron said:

Well said

 

 

- I would not be at all surprised however that when numerous WNW kits are built and stand alongside the HK version for direct comparison, the scale of what WNW have done will become overwhelmingly apparent -[to most]!

I'll find out when the WnW kit comes out. My HK lanc should be done by then. :punk:

 

lanc_zps8fv7t4om.jpg

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4 hours ago, Gazzas said:

Can you imagine if all of these guys who build 1/32 4-engined bombers bring their creations into competition at the same time...  You might fit only 3 on a standard 8-foot table.  You wouldn't want any overhang lest a clumsy person drift too near and catch a wingtip with a shirttail and bring them all crashing to the floor.

That would be an awesome sight, hopefully it will happen somewhere and pictures of it will be posted. The models not the klutz that is, lol.

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The WNW kit may not come into the world blazing a trail of glory, heralding a new age but I don’t think they will need to throw in a free mermaid to impress the bejesuz out of us either. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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With the discussion about so called “oil canning” on aircraft structures and whether it should or should not be visible on model aircraft a little light bulb went on and harked back to an aeronautical engineering degree participated in, sometime during the last century. What we are talking about here is called a Wagner Tension Field ....

 

Tension field theory describes the highly buckled (wrinkled) state of membranes or very thin plates whose boundaries are subjected to certain planar displacements well in excess of those necessary to initiate buckling. The present interest in tension field theory is because lightweight structures with stretched membrane components have potential applications in space. In addition, membrane structures which are pretensioned by internal pressure have application to lightweight portable bridges, protective coverings and various air cushion devices. The theory was conceived by Wagner (1929) [1] whose primary concern was to explain the behaviour of thin metal webs in beams and spars carrying a shear load well in excess of the initial buckling value. Such webs offer little resistance to the compressive strain component of the shear and the spar flanges must be held apart by struts to prevent collapse. In the simple case of rigid spar flanges and rigid perpendicular struts the stress field in the web in the highly buckled state is primarily that of tension at 45°. As the shear load increases so does the magnitude of this tensile stress field and, just as a taut string resists a kinking action, so too does this tensile stress field resist the out-of-plane displacements engendered by the buckling action of the compressive stresses; these opposing actions result in a decreasing wavelength along the compressive buckles which form at right angles to the tension field. Strictly speaking such problems are non-linear and their exact analysis presents formidable difficulties. However, within the framework of large-deflexion plate theory it may be shown that for large values of the ratio (applied shear strain)/(shear strain at initial buckling) the relation between applied loads and planar displacements and stresses again approaches linearity, and it is this asymptotic regime for which tension field theory is applicable. In this regime the flexural stresses and the planar compressive (post-buckling) stresses are negligible compared with the tensile stresses; the assumption that their magnitude is zero is physically equivalent to the assumption of zero flexural membrane stiffness, and it is this which characterises tension field theory: the membrane is envisaged as being finely wrinkled at right angles to the lines of tension. In general these “tension rays” are not necessarily parallel and the boundary conditions need not be those of pure shear, as in our previous example, but shear must play a dominant role in the boundary deformation because of the requirement that the principal strains at any point are of opposite sign. This requirement will be considered in greater detail later but it is clear that if the principal strains are both positive so too are the principal stresses, and if the principal strains are both negative the membrane is ineffective in carrying load.

 

Having been around aircraft all of my professional life, I have seen enough to commend any kit manufacturer to simulate this effect on a model. Bring it on.

 

Any WW2 large aircraft in service for a short while would begin to show these effects.

 

Standing by for incoming rounds.

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I think, if I understand the theory correctly, we are a little beyond WWII engineering. I think what that theory concerns is pretressing the membrane so it stays taught at higher stresses, allowing higher resistance with thinner materials and less weight. Think of fabric covered flaps where they stretch it tight. You don't usually see oilcanning on these surfaces unless the fabric is really stretched. The valleys a lot of models have are incorrect. For WWII, oil-canning happens when the skinning across the framework expands ( or the distance between frames for some reason shrinks) the sheet metal makes up for the difference by oil canning. If the sheeting gets over-stressed, by either racking or stretching of the framework due to high loads, it can reach the plastic limit of the sheet metal, causing it to stretch beyond the metal's ability to snap back to its original dimension. So when unloaded the sheet will show wrinkles or waves in one direction or the other, or possibly in a diagonal direction. They sort of touch on that in your theory, but they are talking about a pre-stressed situation which is different. Of course, my engineering background is structures, not aerodynamics.

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4 hours ago, Radub said:

There are hundreds of photos showing that the skin was uneven! That was the reality, the kit is replicating it. What is there to talk about? 

Radu

I think it's about how much better than Tamiya WNW's are going to be, and whether they will bother eliminating world poverty, hunger and war, or just make a BE.2.

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6 minutes ago, Pup7309 said:

Who cares? If you like it buy it. If not there’s $600 you can spend on something else

$600 buys you an entire squadron of Revell Spitfires. 

 

For $600, I'm expecting my WNW Lanc to not only look 100% real, I'm expecting it to bring me coffee in the morning, mow the lawn twice a week and walk the dogs.

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30 minutes ago, Pup7309 said:

Who cares? If you like it buy it. If not there’s $600 you can spend on something else

 

Whoa there! No one said it would be that much. This is supposed to be a "relaxing hobby". For that kind of money I can have a very relaxing holiday with no paint fumes, no sander dust and no carpet monsters to chase around the floor. :D

Radu 

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16 minutes ago, DeanKB said:

$600 buys you an entire squadron of Revell Spitfires. 

 

For $600, I'm expecting my WNW Lanc to not only look 100% real, I'm expecting it to bring me coffee in the morning, mow the lawn twice a week and walk the dogs.

:thumbsup:  After it’s release and much scrutiny we’ll find out if it is all this and more. 

 

Apologies for any flippancy. Some of the detailed arguments are interesting up to a point.

 

The standard of witty replies here are great though...:bow:

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