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wunwinglow

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wunwinglow last won the day on August 19 2016

wunwinglow had the most liked content!

About wunwinglow

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 09/08/1958

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  • Website URL
    http://www.flyingstartmodels.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bristol, UK
  • Interests
    Modelmaking, Motorcycling, CAD, Rapid Prototyping, Archery, Military History,

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  1. wunwinglow

    F4K/M Phantom Conversion Thoughts

    Oh, another point. The actual production of 3d parts, the cost of the materials, even the costs of the printer, its maintenance, the training and so on, even with the highest of high end machines, pales into utter insignificance compared to the costs, time and effort needed to prepare the 3D data. So, if you REALLY want to get involved with 3D printing, forget printers, nozzles, filaments, resins, UV bulbs and so on. That comes later. MUCH, MUCH later. No, knuckle down and learn how to model in 3D CAD. Only then, Grasshoppers, will you be on the first rung of the ladder to Enlightenment.
  2. wunwinglow

    F4K/M Phantom Conversion Thoughts

    There are sooooooo many issues here...... Reedoak sell 3d printed figures. They are extraordinary, prepared from scans of real people wearing real clothing and equipment. So it is already being done. I myself have been spewing out assorted bits for a few friends on the FormLabs, but for numerous reasons, some technical, more to do do with my procrastination, and the unreliabilty of my printer, now happily fixed, and especially more to do with real life crowding into my limited hobby time, I am unlikely to 'commercialise' them. But I will post a list some time if anyone is interested in what I am interested, if only to spread the love for 3d printing. The possibilities are endless. But, at the moment, so are the limitations, which you MUST take into account if you are going to use the technology.
  3. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    ..AND quantity! They have produced more 1:32 kit types since they started, than all the other kits manufacturers combined in the same period! And they have certainly had more of my money than all the rest, and I only buy the Brit ones. Mostly.....
  4. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    Sorry, why on Earth do you think passion and business profitability are mutually exclusive? That's nonsensical. When they combine, they are a dream formula, surely!!!?
  5. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    To be fair, you do have fantastic beaches, though!!!!!
  6. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    I don't understand where folks think WNW kits are expensive!! I think they are priced extremely competitively, given the extraordinary quality of the product. Now, if I don't have the surplus income to buy as many as I would like, that is a different matter....
  7. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    ...and kits are essentially a consumable. OK, they don't all get built, but as far as the manufacturers are concerned, buying one doesn't prevent the customer buying another, in the same way buying a car or a house does. Otherwise, there would only be one P51 kit on the market, and one Bf 109, and one Tiger tank. 'New, Improved, different from the last' are the driving forces behind the sales, coupled with a desire of the customer to collect the whole series. Whatever the customer sees as a series!! What Hasegawa and WNW are doing is broadening the range of subjects, and generating new niches, by which they get 100% of their new niche, for a while. More power to their elbow...
  8. wunwinglow

    Is WNW nearing the end of its run?

    All interest segments of this hobby are niches. It is a hobby composed entirely of a million micro-niches. And I don't think there are any modellers around nowadays for whom WNW subjects were the delights of their childhood.... Jeez, I wasn't even born when the English Electric Lightning first flew, and I am nearly 61!!
  9. wunwinglow

    what block does the Hobbyboss B-24J represent?

    Yes Thierry, I know some of these things are difficult, but just moaning doesn't actually solve the problem, or make you, or anyone else, very happy. I use 'you' in the general sense, not you personally!! I just find the continual moaning really dispiriting, so much so I don't visit these, and other, forums anywhere near as often as I did. And I am extremely lucky to be in the same model club as Iain, so can witness his corrective work on this kit, and others, in person. I'd rather be inspired, in other words......
  10. wunwinglow

    what block does the Hobbyboss B-24J represent?

    Well, if they don't put the effort in, they never will have them, will they!!?? If folks who complain, put that effort and fury into acquiring the skills, instead of railing against an unfair World, they might end up better modellers, and, maybe, happier people? Just a thought....
  11. wunwinglow

    Hornet vs. Super Hornet?

    If the RAF had them, I'd already be the proud owner. Alas..... I have to draw a line somewhere!
  12. wunwinglow

    Hornet vs. Super Hornet?

    Revell one is my local model shop....
  13. wunwinglow

    3D Printing

    Possibly. I've been been making a few test bits and think it probably better to break the model up into several sections and build them so they taper inwards as they get taller. This gives a a really good finish, and a flat split plane so they mate together cleanly. a few strategicly placed pin holes for some dowels of styrene rod make a very secure joint. I am using HIPS sp easy to glue, fill, sand, prime, score, paint, glue to existing kit parts! Still a bit of a faff to do, but the potential is infinity. And beyond!
  14. Tony, I still have it, I'll drop it round to you!!!
  15. wunwinglow

    3D Printing

    Some other thoughts. You will nearly always need to edit the support locations, I use FormLabs and it does a good job with its suggested supports, but I have never yet been able to run it without moving some to better locations. You can also adjust the contact point size, so have larger, sturdy point where the break scar is going to be hidden, and smaller ones where they are still necessary, but will leave less of a mess to clean up. The software always plays safe, but with a bit of experience and understanding the process, and your own requirements for the part, you can always do better than the software!
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