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Pup7309

WNW is nowhere near the end of its run...!

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Most people, even modelers have no idea how many different kinds of airplanes flew in WW1. The aircraft industry was so new that in such a short time they had to keep reinventing airplanes. They didn’t go from the flimsy first Prewar A types to the Fokker D.Vlls or Bristol Brisfits building only a dozen or so experimental planes. It took hundreds and the only real way they could be tested was in combat. This did prove effective even if costly in men and machines.

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On 3/9/2019 at 9:17 PM, Pup7309 said:

Seems like Hobbycraft have died:

https://forum.largescaleplanes.com/index.php?/topic/79826-is-hobbycraft-still-active/

 

Thought this might be WNWs opportunity to kit some SPADs. Googled it - Roden has already done them. Darn. Dr1 too. 

Roden has only done SPAD Vlls. There are the Xl, Xll, Xlll, etc...

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6 hours ago, Fred Jack said:

Roden has only done SPAD Vlls. There are the Xl, Xll, Xlll, etc...

Well that's good news! So I wonder why they haven't done a xii/xiii? Could do a U.S. and other nationalities boxing, would sell like hotcakes!

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22 hours ago, Out2gtcha said:

 

Id take either for SURE, but a baby on floats would be outstanding

 

29628417434_7ec436bba4_b.jpg

 

 

 

 

Im actually hoping their Lanc sets a precedent, and they expand into more WWII stuff. Other than the Lanc, which does not interest me much,  Im not sure I could resist  much of anything WWII that WnW would put out. 

A Sopwith Baby with fireworks should be released at some stage! Would get one. Not going to get the Lanc. or the HP  (but they do look awesome!) I would be happy to see a Spit and a German nightfighter, but the WW1 market is still waiting/hoping for their future releases!

Edited by Pup7309

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On 3/23/2019 at 3:18 PM, esarmstrong said:

Mongo just pawn in game of life...

 

Alex shall forever be remembered for his role in Mel Brooks's 1974 film Blazing Saddles, in which he played a hulking, dim-witted creature with an indisposition toward equine stand-ins, and one great line: "Mongo only pawn in game of life."

 

For those unfamiliar with the Mel Brooks film "Blazing Saddles", Mongo was a character played by former National Football League Detroit Lions lineman Alex Karras. He was a brutish sort who cold-cocked a horse(not really) in one scene. Not much of a part, but the name Mongo still refers to his character. On another note his eyesight was one step above that of a bat. He wore very thick glasses in regular day to day life, but not on the playing field - he would key off the player next to him to make tackles. He was an excellent player and quite a character.

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18 hours ago, Fred Jack said:

Most people, even modelers have no idea how many different kinds of airplanes flew in WW1. The aircraft industry was so new that in such a short time they had to keep reinventing airplanes. They didn’t go from the flimsy first Prewar A types to the Fokker D.Vlls or Bristol Brisfits building only a dozen or so experimental planes. It took hundreds and the only real way they could be tested was in combat. This did prove effective even if costly in men and machines.

Yes the recent  Gothas are a good example. They had slipped under my radar. When I saw them it was like, wow, something I didn’t know much about, that’s interesting! Will I get one, maybe. Will I make it? Really want to but that rigging and size makes me think twice. Anyways it was a time when many fascinating flying machines were invented and aviation really ‘took off’ (sorry, bad pun!) 

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17 hours ago, Pup7309 said:

Yes the recent  Gothas are a good example. They had slipped under my radar. When I saw them it was like, wow, something I didn’t know much about, that’s interesting! Will I get one, maybe. Will I make it? Really want to but that rigging and size makes me think twice. Anyways it was a time when many fascinating flying machines were invented and aviation really ‘took off’ (sorry, bad pun!) 

Having stood in your shoes at one point in time with regard to the rigging, I am here to say it can be done, and I actually found it enjoyable.  The key is understanding the process before you start, getting organized, having everything all set up properly, and then being patient.  Just do as much work per session as your patience can handle.  If that means you only do 2 runs of rigging in a sitting, so be it!  It's not a race!

 

My only other piece of advice is that although it adds complexity to the process, I have found that using turnbuckles, hollow tubing, and fishing line is actually a lot easier in the long run than going with WNW's suggestion of simply gluing EZ line into some holes.

 

EZ line can be annoying and tricky to work with and it is an unforgiving material; I thought exactly the opposite when I first tried rigging myself.

 

Rigging adds so much to the presentation of a WWI aircraft and it can be enjoyable!  Give it a try! 

 

 

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8 hours ago, ringleheim said:

Having stood in your shoes at one point in time with regard to the rigging, I am here to say it can be done, and I actually found it enjoyable.  The key is understanding the process before you start, getting organized, having everything all set up properly, and then being patient.  Just do as much work per session as your patience can handle.  If that means you only do 2 runs of rigging in a sitting, so be it!  It's not a race!

 

My only other piece of advice is that although it adds complexity to the process, I have found that using turnbuckles, hollow tubing, and fishing line is actually a lot easier in the long run than going with WNW's suggestion of simply gluing EZ line into some holes.

 

EZ line can be annoying and tricky to work with and it is an unforgiving material; I thought exactly the opposite when I first tried rigging myself.

 

Rigging adds so much to the presentation of a WWI aircraft and it can be enjoyable!  Give it a try! 

 

 

So fishing line - any type in particular?

 

Yes rigging makes the model...just noticed they have completed the G1...

 

http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/productdetail?productid=3198&cat=5

 

Brilliant! Such a weird and wonderful beast!

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On 3/29/2019 at 6:21 PM, Pup7309 said:

So fishing line - any type in particular?

 

Yes rigging makes the model...just noticed they have completed the G1...

 

http://www.wingnutwings.com/ww/productdetail?productid=3198&cat=5

 

Brilliant! Such a weird and wonderful beast!

I never would have guessed WnWs would come out with two versions of a G-1. it’s amazing when you think that the first two production contracts for the G-1 were classified as fighters, it wasn’t until the release of the Eindecker 1 that the Germans decided to take this slow ineffective fighter and do something else to it like adding bombs. I probably won’t get one, but it is a nice looking plane, I guess????!!!???

Edited by Fred Jack

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