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How to "unglue" Resin


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Hello, I recently purchased a "used" 1/32 Fisher F9F-5 Panther. Aside from the lack of assembly instructions and decal sheets, the only work done on the kit was glue the "chin" under the nose to try and turn the -5 to a -6. I apologize if this subject has been covered but I am looking for the best way to remove this "chin" piece and revert this back to a -5. So my question is, is there a safe way to unglue this resin piece from the resin body? Just too expensive a kit to destroy due to my lack of experience with resin.

 

Thanks for any help you can provide.

Edited by WarLycan
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Hot water, (boiling if you are brave) but be careful not to warp anything. However, all is not lost if you do warp something because hot water will allow you to put it back. I've used MEK to strip paint from resin in the past, and it has often released any superglued joints. However I always assumed that resin was inert to CA glue, but experience has shown that it's not always the case.

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Quite a few organic solvents will attack cyanoacrylate. Acetone normally works for softening cured CA, and nitromethane works even better. There are quite a few CA debonders commercially available, some gelified to prevent the debonder from running off and to make it less volatile.

 

Freezing works be breaking the CA polymer bonds, but since synthetic resins are also polymerized, there is in principle some risk that freezing may also make the resin brittle.

Edited by pvanroy
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When I first encountered super glue the stuff was mega-expensive that was way back, there was a de-bonder which was also very expensive on a couple of occasions we needed to remove the stuff we used "fresh" not tinned  pineapple juice not quick but it worked.

That was on the early mixes not used that technique for years.

 

 

Bob

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3 hours ago, pvanroy said:

Acetone normally works for softening cured CA...

Acetone is the active ingredient in CA "Debonders", and also plain old Nail Polish Remover. Nail Polish Removers also have various fillers and scents that dilute it enough to not attack plastic or resin while still easily removing CA. 

 

Straight Acetone definitely attacks plastic. While it might not attack some resins, I wouldn't want to find out that it does on an expensive kit. 

 

HTH,

D

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17 hours ago, D Bellis said:

Acetone is the active ingredient in CA "Debonders", and also plain old Nail Polish Remover. Nail Polish Removers also have various fillers and scents that dilute it enough to not attack plastic or resin while still easily removing CA. 

 

Straight Acetone definitely attacks plastic. While it might not attack some resins, I wouldn't want to find out that it does on an expensive kit. 

 

HTH,

D

 

I think most commercial CA debonders nowadays use propylene carbonate, because it is non-toxic and has only limited potential for irritation. Undiluted acetone obviously attacks polystyrene, but in principle it should be safe to use on PUR. That said, I agree it's not really a leap of faith you'd want to take on an expensive and rare kit! So, maybe test on a casting block first to be safe?

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