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Well spotted Richard, brilliant!! A real pin-up girl. :rolleyes:  Read on:

 

Joy Lofthouse was a pilot who flew bombers and fighter aircraft for the ATA during the Second World War.

Born on 14 February 1923 in South Cerney in Gloucestershire, Lofthouse was educated at Cirencester Grammar School. She was working as a cashier at Lloyds Bank when the Second World War broke out.

In 1943, after seeing an advert in a magazine calling for women to learn how to fly, Lofthouse successfully applied for the ATA. Unknown to Lofthouse, her sister Yvonne Wheatley had also applied and was accepted into the service. Together, Lofthouse and Wheatley served in what the press of the time dubbed ‘Attagirls’ for the duration of the war.

Lofthouse completed her training at Thame in Oxfordshire, learning to fly a range of single-seater aircrafts. Remarkably, she learned to fly before obtaining her driving licence. In 1944, she was posted to Hamble, where her duties included the transportation of aircraft, medical supplies and personnel to bases around Britain. Over the course of her time with the ATA, Lofthouse flew a range of aircraft, including Hawker Tempest Vs, North American Mustangs and Spitfires. In 1945, she also trained to fly two-seater aircraft. She had little chance to implement this training, however, as with the end of the war came the end of the ATA. In peacetime, jobs for women pilots became nearly non-existent and Lofthouse stopped flying, training to become a teacher.

The full extent of Lofthouse’s wartime contribution was not recognised until decades after the end of the war, when the role of women during the conflict started to become more widely-acknowledged. In the last decades of her life, she became re-involved in the world of aviation. Here, she became a patron of the charity Fly2Help, which encouraged young people to learn to fly and gave talks to women considering careers in the RAF.

In 2008 Joy Lofthouse was awarded a commemorative badge for the Attagirls, issued by the government. She died on 15 November 2017, aged 94.

 

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Edited by mozart
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4 minutes ago, Oldbaldguy said:

I assume the ATA was the Brit equivalent of WASPs in the U.S.?  These gals did some pretty wonderous stuff back in the day and put up with a lot.  At least ours did.

 

Air Transport Auxiliaries

 

Some of them had incredible log books!

 

Richard

 

AND I AM WRONG!

 

She's Maureen Adele Chase Dunlop de PoppMaureen Dunlop to you

 

 

Edited by RLWP
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On 2/26/2021 at 6:23 PM, Oldbaldguy said:

I assume the ATA was the Brit equivalent of WASPs in the U.S.?  These gals did some pretty wonderous stuff back in the day and put up with a lot.  At least ours did.

The Air Transport Auxiliary's role included ferrying aircraft from factories to operational bases, and much more as well.  Many of its pilots included pre-war flying club members and latterly completely untrained new blood such as Maureen and Joy.  Amazing people one and all.  If you want to read one excellent account of life in the ATA I can thoroughly recommend "Fly and Deliver" by Hugh Bergel, fantastic book.

 

No worries Richard, still a stunner!  Since many said their favourite aircraft to fly, not surprisingly, was a Spitfire there is only one contender, which has languished awaiting inspiration for many years:

 

Lb4FlL.jpg

 

This one was scheduled to be a 56 squadron aircraft though they only flew them for a short while before converting to Tempests, but it would have been delivered sans squadron codes though allocated a serial number.

 

Edited by mozart
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14 minutes ago, mozart said:

 

No worries Richard, still a stunner!  Since many said their favourite aircraft to fly, not surprisingly, was a Spitfire there is only one contender

 

 

The ATA girls all seem to have been remarkable women. I wonder if we can find a 'plane that she is known to have flown

 

Richard

MORE I don't think I'll start here!: https://www.abebooks.co.uk/signed-first-edition/Air-Transport-Auxiliary-Pilots-Flying-Logbooks/22182525884/bd

 

EVEN MORE: Could start here: https://archive.atamuseum.org/logbooks.php

 

Edited by RLWP
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I've been musing on this subject - can you imagine what the Spitfires ATA pilots flew were like?

 

Absolutely brand spanking new, engine in tip-top condition, probably no armament, limited equipment and enough fuel to make the delivery flight. So, in peak condition and minimum weight

 

A sports car must be pretty tame after that

 

Richard

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And until late on in the war, no radio equipment either.  According to Hugh Bergel they soon knew their way around the UK very quickly including some decidedly dodgy areas including cities such as Liverpool with barrage balloons but then tricky diversions according to the weather.

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I found that somewhere - Fairey Barracuda?

 

Richard

 

MORE: 

 

Quote

First Officer Maureen Dunlop (1920 - 2012), of the ATA (Air Transport Auxiliary), exits a Fairey Barracuda torpedo bomber, September 1944. ATA pilots are trained to deliver newly manufactured aircraft from the factory to military airfields. The Barracuda is on its way to a British Naval Air Station. Original publication: Picture Post - 1805 - The Work Of The Ferry Pilots - pub. 16th September 1944.

 

https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/first-officer-maureen-dunlop-of-the-ata-exits-a-fairey-news-photo/153078201

 

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