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WNW Albatros DV


Greif8
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On 2/9/2020 at 10:29 AM, dodgem37 said:

Go! Ernest, Go!  Looks great.

 

Sincerely,

Mark

 

Thank you Mark.  I am nearly finished putting the Aviattic Lozenge decals on the wings.  Due to the shape of the wings, especially the upper one,  the process has been a bit more challenging than the D VII.  I have managed a decent effort and will post photos later today.

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I completed putting on the Aviattic decals a while ago.  Before I started I thought they might be a bit more challenging to put down then the lozenge decals I put on the D VII due to the shape of the wings - and I was right.  It took some work to get the decals to conform to the curvature of the wings, but it was not too much of a struggle and they turned out alright.  Like the D VII I did not get everything 100% perfect, but they look pretty good from all viewing angles and distances, with the exception of extreme closeups in a couple of areas.  I can live with that.  The following photos are not the best I have taken, but give a decent impression of what the wings look like now.  I still have to gloss coat them and then will put the wing crosses on.  These decals are much more vivid than the ones I used on the D VII so I will be toning them down a bit.

 

 

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Edited by Greif8
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1 hour ago, Gazzas said:

Everything looks great, Ernest!

 

Thank you Gaz!  I really like the Aviattic decals.  They go down well and are slightly "stretchy" when warm so you can nudge them into corners or onto edges that need a little more coverage.  If these look as good as the D VII ones did once I matt coat them they well look very realistic.

 

Ernest

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I finished the wings about an hour ago.  The decals, both the kit and the Aviattic ones, went down very well and turned out pretty nice.  The matt coat took a lot of the vividness out of the colors which is what I wanted.  I still think I will spray a thin brownish glaze coat on the wings though, mostly to see what it will look like.  One of the cool things about the Aviattic decals is that they take on a "fabric" appearance once the matt coat is sprayed which looks pretty realistic to my eye.  Overall I am pretty satisfied with how the wings turned out - of course I still have to install and rig them - so there is still plenty of time to screw something up!

 

The final two photos show the figure I plan to use with this build.  It is a mechanic, and I plan to put the barograph in his right hand and position him in such a way as to simulate a portion of the preparation before a flight.  I thought I would do a small SBS so others can follow along with how I "do" a figure.  Hopefully I am not coming off arrogant here by assuming folks will want to see me construct a figure - believe me, I am no Shep Paine (may he rest in peace) or Calvin Tan, but I can turn out decent figures and thought some of you might want to "look behind the curtain" to see the process I use.

 

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The entire crew together for a group shot.

 

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Close up of the rudder, you can make out the texture fairly well.

 

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Top of the upper wing.  The texture effect is very evident in this shot.

 

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Body of the figure after basic construction.  I have cleaned up any seams and flash.  I still have to putty the shoulders and will use Vallejo's putty for that task. 

It is easy to apply and you can add folds and creases to it so it is a good putty for figures.  The Barograph will actually go in the left hand and cigarette will go in the right hand.

 

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The head prior to final cleaning up.  This is normally a simple and quick process that I use a tooth brush and/or steel wool to do (gently).  I then wipe the resin or plastic with alcohol to give it a final cleaning.   Just as with the model, this prep is important, especially for the head so that it is as clean and smooth as possible for the base coat to be airbrushed.

If the face is not clean and smooth it is nearly impossible to do the blending required to give the face life with shadows and highlights.  This face has some good potential by the way, being crisply cast, always a major plus. 

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I am at a stage in the build when there is not anything photo worthy; just a lot of cleaning up of small parts.  On the other hand I did a fair amount of work on the figure.  Under each of the photos below I will outline what I did and why I did it.  If anyone has questions or would like more information please just ask and I will try to give a sensible answer.  :D

 

 

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The most important part of the figure is the head.  I have sprayed the base coat using Tamiya's Buff color which I think gives a nice flesh toned base.  I will gently rub the face down with an old t-shirt once it cures.  As I said in the previous post, this is a pretty good casting and you can already see the face coming to life.  The crisp delineations will make it easier to lay in the shadows and highlights when the time comes.  

 

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 You can see that I have covered the flesh areas with Parafilm.  I do this before spraying the base uniform colors.  One could also paint the uniform by hand - I have done that many times in the past - but airbrushing allows you to get a head start on the shadows as you will see in the next photo.  Putting Parafilm around the flesh areas is pretty easy and a usually don't have to touch up any of them afterwards.  I don't recommend using a blow dryer to speed up the drying of the paint as really hot air and Parafilm don't mix too well.  Don't ask me how I know that!  

 

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Black basing for figures!  Just as with aircraft, or armor as well, having a black base coat allows you to adjust the depth of your colors and helps with the blending process when it is time to lay in the highlights and shadows.  I never do this for faces or hands, arms etc. because the contrast is too stark in my opinion.  A 1/32 scale face is a bit larger than a pea and you don't have a lot of space to get the transitions from light to dark to look right.  Also you want to keep the layers you will be painting on the face to a minimum to avoid too much paint build up which will make the face look like a lifeless blob.

 

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Even more Parafilm.  I decided to leave the pants a charcoal shade of black and the boots just a bit lighter than that.  I will be painting the blouse Feldgrau, so I needed to cover up the lower extremities.  I also covered up the center part of the cap as the upper part will also be Feldgrau.  Again this is pretty quick and easy to do, and the payoff is definitely worth it. 

 

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Base painting complete - well almost!  You can see that the black base does a nice job simulating the shadows and gives me excellent target areas to lay in the shadows further with oils.  One could just paint the highlights and leave the shadows as they are; the direct lighting of my work bench is pretty strong and overwhelms the shadow effect somewhat.  However, I like the ability to generate subtle transitions with artist oils.  You can also see the subtle difference in shade between the pants and the boots.  You can also see the Feldgrau on the upper portion of the cap on the figure's head.  I did manage to get a tiny bit of Feldgrau on the left hand, but that is easily fixed.

 

 

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 Finally a close up of the head.  I will finish painting the cap by hand.  Afterwards will come the most challenging part of painting a figure - bring the face to life.

 

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Ok lots of just rambling questions here as i think of them lol focusing on the jacket as mentioned the shadows to start with and that seems to really be what sets a figure apart and gives it life.

So when painting the jacket you’re not covering it completely right? That’s part of what gives you the shadows? Do you spray right at it, or do you spray at an angle to try and keep from filling the folds? I always seem to end up with a solid color. I starT with a satin black - citadel chaos black. Didn’t know about that parafilm so will have to get some and stop uniformly painting everything black :rolleyes:

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6 hours ago, themongoose said:

Ok lots of just rambling questions here as i think of them lol focusing on the jacket as mentioned the shadows to start with and that seems to really be what sets a figure apart and gives it life.

So when painting the jacket you’re not covering it completely right? That’s part of what gives you the shadows? Do you spray right at it, or do you spray at an angle to try and keep from filling the folds? I always seem to end up with a solid color. I starT with a satin black - citadel chaos black. Didn’t know about that parafilm so will have to get some and stop uniformly painting everything black :rolleyes:

 

Hello not rambling at all rather good questions.  I should have stated up front that I spray figures from above keeping the paint cone downwards.  This replicates light striking the figure and does a good job covering it in a way that leaves "shadows" in the creases.  I also spray VERY thin coats, usually 3-4, building up the paint slowly to avoid too much coverage.  Some of the creases and folds will get covered with the base coat, but that is not an issue because they will receive their "shadows" later.  In fact it adds to the effect as there will be different shades of shadows.  

 

I also did not say that I never use straight black for the undercoat.  I actually use a shade I call tire black that is one I mixed to spray tires, it works well for this purpose also.  The reason I never use pure black is because if you are replicating a black colored uniform item you will have no control over how the deep shadows will look as of course nothing is darker then black.  The figure I am working on will bring this out when I begin the shadows and highlights painting phase.  

 

Parafilm is useful stuff.  I get mine from health care supply sources.  

 

Ernest

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Rather helpfully for those who might wish to scratchbuild the valves, Taurus’s website has PDF instructions that show the open/closed configuration.  Very laudable on their part as I’d have done them all the same (or at least as much so as I could manage).

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13 hours ago, Wegener said:

Rather helpfully for those who might wish to scratchbuild the valves, Taurus’s website has PDF instructions that show the open/closed configuration.  Very laudable on their part as I’d have done them all the same (or at least as much so as I could manage).

 

They also provide a nice little guide showing the order valves are compressed and which are not with the packet the parts come in.

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The build continues.  I have reached the phase where I have to install the upper wing.  The photos below show the process about third complete.  I am moving slowly step by step hopefully avoiding any major issues.  I have also posted some photos of the figure as I add shadows and highlights to the pants.

 

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One of the kit Spandaus with the PE cooling jacket.  The harsh direct lighting on the bench makes it look much more "silvery" then it really is.  I will take a better shot when the build is finished.  

 

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Starting to look like a bi-plane.  The direct lighting really makes the lozenge colors pop.

 

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Installing the struts into the fuselage one by one very slowly!

 

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Hard to see, but I have added the deep shadows.  This shows them before blending.

 

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And after blending, the shadows show up better on the boots.

 

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The direct light (and the fact the oils are still wet) washes out a good deal of the effect, but I could not get a shot with less light to show up good enough.  The pants and boots have their shadows complete.

 

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Intermediate highlights in place before blending.

 

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And after blending.  

 

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High highlights laid in.

 

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And blended.  Note that oils always look very garish when wet.  Once dry the contrasts will be more subtle.  I will do my best to take a couple of shots under good

lighting so you can see what the finished pants/boots look like when dry.

Edited by Greif8
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