Jump to content
Bil

1:16 Scale Scratch-built PT-17 Stearman

Recommended Posts

 

Where does everybody keep getting these types of drawings?  When I start my build next year, I would like to do the same thing with my build (B-25 under restoration)

 

Love your work sir....drooling looking forward to your updates!

 

Dan, take a look at the Air Corps Library, for $5 a month you get access to all of the engineer drawings and technical manuals for:

  • P-51 (B and D I think)
  • P-47 (not sure which versions, but I think both the razorback and the bubble canopy versions)
  • AT-6
  • P-38
  • F8F
  • P-40
  • JRF Goose
  • J2F Duck
  • F6F
  • B-25
  • TBM Avenger
  • F4U
  • L-5 Sentinel
  • BT-13
  • B-17
  • Spitfire (various marks)
  • FM-2 Wildcat
  • T-28
  • PT-17

It's well worth it in my opinion... though some of the aircraft drawings are not organized very well and would be very difficult to work with (J2F Duck for example would be challenging).

 

Bil

Edited by Bil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This weekend I conducted a few experiments.. I recently got a 3D printer, nothing fancy like a Form2, but I am digging it and I am using it mainly to build tools for special applications.  In the past I had a lot of trouble forming aluminum into the correct shapes for ribs, etc.  I was using wooden forms that I cut to shape and then formed the metal over them, worked okay, but I wanted a more precise way to create these parts, something that would make it easy to create multiples as needed.  My idea is to model in 3D the forms required and then use it as a press to form the aluminum... I wanted my first experiment to be fairly simple, the part I selected is the Aileron Spar Tip (highlighted in yellow).

Parts%2BManual%2B-%2BWing%2BGroup-26%2Bc

 

The first step of course was to model the male and female forms in my 3D program... the key here was to ensure I left enough room for the aluminum so the female form was scaled up accordingly.

001.JPG

 

...then I took the models into the 3D printer software to prep it for printing...

002.JPG

 

Then I sent it to the printer.. they came out nice and tight.

IMG_1480.JPG

 

Too tight actually.. I had to go back and scale down the male form to allow more room for the aluminum (ended up being .75 mm difference).. after that the fit was perfect.

IMG_1482.JPG

 

The rear of this part (Aileron Spar Tip) is flat and does not have a bend, so the piece of aluminum was placed flash with the rear of the shape in the female form, then the male form was inserted, starting at the rear and pushing down smoothly to the tip of the form...

IMG_1483.JPG

 

Then using my smoothing stick I forced the male form in fully and smoothed the edges that were on the outside.

IMG_1484.JPG

 

When it was removed from the form, it had a bit of a slope at the tip, but reinserting it and smoothing more firmly in this area fixed that...

IMG_1485.JPG

 

I was careful to leave the male form in place to help protect the formed aluminum.  I will keep it in place until I am ready to assemble this part.

IMG_1510.JPG

 

Flipping the part over,with the male form still in place I carefully removed the aluminum excess...this is very easy with the form still in place...

IMG_1512.JPG

 

...until I got to the fragile tip of the part.. I ripped the aluminum when trying to cut out the tip...

IMG_1513.JPG

 

So I did it again, making sure I cut the tip out first this time... and being extra careful.  the second try looked much better.

IMG_1514.JPG

 

So, overall a successful test I think...

IMG_1515.JPG

 

I might use my vacuum form tool for really intricate ribs with complicated holes cut in them... but for most ribs, I think this process will work fine.

IMG_1516.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SECOND TEST

 

Continuing on with the aileron parts, I am doing another test, this time: adding rivet detail.  I will be stealing a page from Peter Castle's play-book for this... 

 
The tool I am using is a beading tool... works beautifully actually.
beading%2BTool.JPG
The part I am experimenting with is the Aileron Spar Reinforcement Plate (highlighted in red below):
Parts%2BManual%2B-%2BWing%2BGroup-26%2Bc
 
Another page from Peter's Spitfire (with my own flair ;) )... To ensure I keep straight and accurate rivet lines, I built a rivet template tool in 3D, then printed it out on my awesome 3D printer.
 
One side of this tool has notches spaced 1.6mm, the other side has them spaced 2mm... I will create additional rivet templates as needed.
IMG_1528.JPG
 
After cutting the shape out of aluminum (with the template rubber cemented to the shape metal) I used the beading tool, which is being guided by the rivet template tool, to create the rivet lines.
IMG_1526.JPG
 
IMG_1527.JPG
 
So after I have added all the rivet detail, I take off the paper template, turn the part over and buff it lightly with my wooden forming tool... this part needs raised rivets, so this is the reverse side from where I added the rivets.
 
The top most row of rivets is at 1.6mm spacing, the rest are at 2mm spacing.
IMG_1520.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to the forum and I've been away from modeling for about 25 years, so please be gentle.

 

@ Bil,

 

How did I miss this build so far? I am amazed by your craftsmanship. Very interesting entry, high level of scratchbuilding skills, considering your 25 years of absence from scale modeling hobby. I wish I would have spotted this thread earlier, but I just found it. As I also see, you are experienced on 3D design, isn't that right? If so, why didn't tried to 3D print some parts? I guess that old fashioned scratchbuilding and dirt under nails is the absolute joy of the hobby, but on the other hand, 3D is a tool to offer better results - in most cases.

 

However, I totally admit that your build is one of the very very very few examples, where human fingers build much better that high tech 3D printer machines. Respect!

 

Anyway, considering I've already built this exact model for a customer in almost same scale as a 3D printed miniature, do not hesitate to contract with me or my associates at Anyuta 3D. Τhe customer funded the whole project (3D design, 3D print production and miniature building) and asked for exclusivity privilege (item is not available for public sales as a kit), but I guess that there is not any problem if you need some special part or individual component that cannot be scratchbuilt.

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_01.jpg

 

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_02.jpg

 

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_03.jpg

 

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_04.jpg

 

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_05.jpg

 

Anyuta_3_D_Boeing_Stearman_06.jpg

Edited by Nick_Karatzides

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ Bil,

How did I miss this build so far? I am amazed by your craftsmanship. Very interesting entry, high level of scratchbuilding skills, considering your 25 years of absence from scale modeling hobby. I wish I would have spotted this thread earlier, but I just found it. As I also see, you are experienced on 3D design, isn't that right? If so, why didn't tried to 3D print some parts? I guess that old fashioned scratchbuilding and dirt under nails is the absolute joy of the hobby, but on the other hand, 3D is a tool to offer better results - in most cases.However, I totally admit that your build is one of the very very very few examples, where human fingers build much better that high tech 3D printer machines. Respect!

Anyway, considering I've already built this exact model for a customer in almost same scale as a 3D printed miniature, do not hesitate to contract with me or my associates at Anyuta 3D. Τhe customer funded the whole project (3D design, 3D print production and miniature building) and asked for exclusivity privilege (item is not available for public sales as a kit), but I guess that there is not any problem if you need some special part or individual component that cannot be

Nick, thanks. Yeah I actually have a 3D printer but my Philosophy for his model is to use it for creating tooling and jigs. I do plan on building complicated parts in 3D like the engine and landing gear components then printing those. But you are right there is a real satisfaction to actually creating these assemblies by hand.

 

I might be interested in that engine though. ;)

 

I would love to see any photos of your 3D printed model, I bet it is amazing.

 

Bil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...