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VintageEagle

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  1. Like
  2. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to G-Man in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    I am in the same boat as you Roger, as I am only on my second model ever. I did a 1/48 Bf 109E first and am now working on a 1/32 version as it builds easier and pops more in my collection.
     
    For decals, I have never tried Micosol, I use Mr. Mark Setter and Mr. Mark Softer. They work beautifully and make the decals appear painted on.
     
    And I know what you mean about the cockpit taking forever. I spend the most time completing the cockpit and filling seams. Hence they are my most disliked aspects of model making.
  3. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from GDW in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    G'd morning,
     
    OK, I have spent some time to first lighten up the RLM 66 and then to experiment a bit with different weathering methods. Remember, it's all new to me after I finished my last model more than 20 years ago.
     
    I was first trying to figure out the painting sequence and came up with the following:
     
    1 Paint in acrylics
    2 Drybrush (in enmael?)
    3 Paint details
    4 Add moderate chipping to the floor using an artist pencil
    5 Add dirt on the floor
    6 Add an enmael-based black wash
    7 Apply a clear coat Tamiya acrylics
    8 Apply instrument decals
    9 Apply a flat coat (Vallejo)
     
    Quite a few steps for such a small part that will mostly disappear in the fuselage. Now to the execution. I used the Revell cockpit to experiment a bit. Here's what I have tried so far:
     
    DRYBRUSIHING:
    I already struggled with drybrushing. This is a method I used already 20 years ago, but for some reason it didn't work properly this time. Maybe because I was trying to use enmael over acrylics? The edges became shiny, but not really lighter as almost no paint was deposited. Maybe I used the wrong paint or should have waited longer so that the brush dries a bit more before I started. Any good advice?
     
    WASH:
    I used an AK Interactive black wash and applied it with a small brush, which worked quite well. I didn't even have to remove the excess, but could merge the wash with the brush.
     
    DIRT:
    I used a sand colored wash by AK Interactive that I applied with a small brush to the cockpit floow. The color was probably a bit too light. Anyhow, it worked also quite well, but I remember having seen better results, but I don't know how they were achieved (possibly pastel or pigments?).
     
    CHIPPING:
    I applied very moderate chipping using a silver pencil. It worked well, but the chips are not as sharp edged as you probably can achieve using other methods. What are your recommendations for chipping inside the cockpit?
     
    SHADING:
    I haven't tried it yet, but was considering using the airbrush and highly diluted black paint to add some shades to panel and corners. Will have to try it I guess.
     
    Spent a whole evening for what is probably basics for most of you, but that's part of the learning. Next time I will know a bit more and be a bit faster. Would appreciate your thoughts about how best to weather the cockpit (not overdone, but still adding depth and character).
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

  4. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    G'd morning,
     
    OK, I have spent some time to first lighten up the RLM 66 and then to experiment a bit with different weathering methods. Remember, it's all new to me after I finished my last model more than 20 years ago.
     
    I was first trying to figure out the painting sequence and came up with the following:
     
    1 Paint in acrylics
    2 Drybrush (in enmael?)
    3 Paint details
    4 Add moderate chipping to the floor using an artist pencil
    5 Add dirt on the floor
    6 Add an enmael-based black wash
    7 Apply a clear coat Tamiya acrylics
    8 Apply instrument decals
    9 Apply a flat coat (Vallejo)
     
    Quite a few steps for such a small part that will mostly disappear in the fuselage. Now to the execution. I used the Revell cockpit to experiment a bit. Here's what I have tried so far:
     
    DRYBRUSIHING:
    I already struggled with drybrushing. This is a method I used already 20 years ago, but for some reason it didn't work properly this time. Maybe because I was trying to use enmael over acrylics? The edges became shiny, but not really lighter as almost no paint was deposited. Maybe I used the wrong paint or should have waited longer so that the brush dries a bit more before I started. Any good advice?
     
    WASH:
    I used an AK Interactive black wash and applied it with a small brush, which worked quite well. I didn't even have to remove the excess, but could merge the wash with the brush.
     
    DIRT:
    I used a sand colored wash by AK Interactive that I applied with a small brush to the cockpit floow. The color was probably a bit too light. Anyhow, it worked also quite well, but I remember having seen better results, but I don't know how they were achieved (possibly pastel or pigments?).
     
    CHIPPING:
    I applied very moderate chipping using a silver pencil. It worked well, but the chips are not as sharp edged as you probably can achieve using other methods. What are your recommendations for chipping inside the cockpit?
     
    SHADING:
    I haven't tried it yet, but was considering using the airbrush and highly diluted black paint to add some shades to panel and corners. Will have to try it I guess.
     
    Spent a whole evening for what is probably basics for most of you, but that's part of the learning. Next time I will know a bit more and be a bit faster. Would appreciate your thoughts about how best to weather the cockpit (not overdone, but still adding depth and character).
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

  5. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from GDW in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    I probably will lighten up the color a bit before adding shades again. In reality it is lighter than it appears in the last photo, but since it will be quite dark anyways in the cockpit, it's probably good to lighten the color a bit. 
     
    Here's a fragment of a main instrument panel of a Bf 109 G just to show how dark RLM 66 was (compare RLM 66 with the black instruments): 
     

     
    By the way, the rpm indicator and fuel gauge were not the ones originally installed in the panel, as they were for a Bf 109 K-4 (rpm indicator) and Fw 190 (fuel gauge). The manifold pressure indicator is the correct one for a Bf 109 G-6 and may have been the original one that had been installed in this panel.
     
    Is drybrushing still the standard method for bringing out highlights (if so, I assume Enmael over Acrylics should work ok for drybrushing)? I also may add chipping using a silver pen and adding dirt using e.g. AK Interactive dust.
     
    Do you have some recommendations how to make the cockpit more realistic looking?
  6. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from GDW in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    Just a tiny update: instrument panel and seat cushion cut and sanded. Note the correct selection for an Fw 190 F-8 of the auxiliary panel with the ASK190 bomb sequence selector and ZSK 244.
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

  7. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Jan_G in SWS Horten Ho 229   
    Hi Jan,
     
    these engines look gorgeous! I like the subtle and not exaggerated weathering. Just one note: the engines were all bare metal except for the black center part around the combustion chambers.
     
    Cheers
    Roger
  8. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from MARU5137 in 1/18 Spitfire Mk. XIVe - Race #80   
    Hi Peter,
     
    I'd go for a bare metal Me 262... if I had your skills that is :-)
     
    Cheers
    Roger
  9. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Shawn M in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    G'd morning,
     
    OK, I have spent some time to first lighten up the RLM 66 and then to experiment a bit with different weathering methods. Remember, it's all new to me after I finished my last model more than 20 years ago.
     
    I was first trying to figure out the painting sequence and came up with the following:
     
    1 Paint in acrylics
    2 Drybrush (in enmael?)
    3 Paint details
    4 Add moderate chipping to the floor using an artist pencil
    5 Add dirt on the floor
    6 Add an enmael-based black wash
    7 Apply a clear coat Tamiya acrylics
    8 Apply instrument decals
    9 Apply a flat coat (Vallejo)
     
    Quite a few steps for such a small part that will mostly disappear in the fuselage. Now to the execution. I used the Revell cockpit to experiment a bit. Here's what I have tried so far:
     
    DRYBRUSIHING:
    I already struggled with drybrushing. This is a method I used already 20 years ago, but for some reason it didn't work properly this time. Maybe because I was trying to use enmael over acrylics? The edges became shiny, but not really lighter as almost no paint was deposited. Maybe I used the wrong paint or should have waited longer so that the brush dries a bit more before I started. Any good advice?
     
    WASH:
    I used an AK Interactive black wash and applied it with a small brush, which worked quite well. I didn't even have to remove the excess, but could merge the wash with the brush.
     
    DIRT:
    I used a sand colored wash by AK Interactive that I applied with a small brush to the cockpit floow. The color was probably a bit too light. Anyhow, it worked also quite well, but I remember having seen better results, but I don't know how they were achieved (possibly pastel or pigments?).
     
    CHIPPING:
    I applied very moderate chipping using a silver pencil. It worked well, but the chips are not as sharp edged as you probably can achieve using other methods. What are your recommendations for chipping inside the cockpit?
     
    SHADING:
    I haven't tried it yet, but was considering using the airbrush and highly diluted black paint to add some shades to panel and corners. Will have to try it I guess.
     
    Spent a whole evening for what is probably basics for most of you, but that's part of the learning. Next time I will know a bit more and be a bit faster. Would appreciate your thoughts about how best to weather the cockpit (not overdone, but still adding depth and character).
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

  10. Like
    VintageEagle reacted to LSP_Kevin in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    The primary secret to successful drybrushing is to ensure that the target surface is quite matt (flat). This gives the pigments on the brush something to grip to as you work them around. It's quite difficult to achieve any worthwhile effect over a satin surface, and it practically doesn't work at all over a gloss one.
     
    With washes - particularly where you're trying to create shadows rather than dirt - quite the opposite is true.
     
    Kev
  11. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Shaka HI in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    G'd morning,
     
    OK, I have spent some time to first lighten up the RLM 66 and then to experiment a bit with different weathering methods. Remember, it's all new to me after I finished my last model more than 20 years ago.
     
    I was first trying to figure out the painting sequence and came up with the following:
     
    1 Paint in acrylics
    2 Drybrush (in enmael?)
    3 Paint details
    4 Add moderate chipping to the floor using an artist pencil
    5 Add dirt on the floor
    6 Add an enmael-based black wash
    7 Apply a clear coat Tamiya acrylics
    8 Apply instrument decals
    9 Apply a flat coat (Vallejo)
     
    Quite a few steps for such a small part that will mostly disappear in the fuselage. Now to the execution. I used the Revell cockpit to experiment a bit. Here's what I have tried so far:
     
    DRYBRUSIHING:
    I already struggled with drybrushing. This is a method I used already 20 years ago, but for some reason it didn't work properly this time. Maybe because I was trying to use enmael over acrylics? The edges became shiny, but not really lighter as almost no paint was deposited. Maybe I used the wrong paint or should have waited longer so that the brush dries a bit more before I started. Any good advice?
     
    WASH:
    I used an AK Interactive black wash and applied it with a small brush, which worked quite well. I didn't even have to remove the excess, but could merge the wash with the brush.
     
    DIRT:
    I used a sand colored wash by AK Interactive that I applied with a small brush to the cockpit floow. The color was probably a bit too light. Anyhow, it worked also quite well, but I remember having seen better results, but I don't know how they were achieved (possibly pastel or pigments?).
     
    CHIPPING:
    I applied very moderate chipping using a silver pencil. It worked well, but the chips are not as sharp edged as you probably can achieve using other methods. What are your recommendations for chipping inside the cockpit?
     
    SHADING:
    I haven't tried it yet, but was considering using the airbrush and highly diluted black paint to add some shades to panel and corners. Will have to try it I guess.
     
    Spent a whole evening for what is probably basics for most of you, but that's part of the learning. Next time I will know a bit more and be a bit faster. Would appreciate your thoughts about how best to weather the cockpit (not overdone, but still adding depth and character).
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

  12. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Uncarina in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    G'd morning,
     
    OK, I have spent some time to first lighten up the RLM 66 and then to experiment a bit with different weathering methods. Remember, it's all new to me after I finished my last model more than 20 years ago.
     
    I was first trying to figure out the painting sequence and came up with the following:
     
    1 Paint in acrylics
    2 Drybrush (in enmael?)
    3 Paint details
    4 Add moderate chipping to the floor using an artist pencil
    5 Add dirt on the floor
    6 Add an enmael-based black wash
    7 Apply a clear coat Tamiya acrylics
    8 Apply instrument decals
    9 Apply a flat coat (Vallejo)
     
    Quite a few steps for such a small part that will mostly disappear in the fuselage. Now to the execution. I used the Revell cockpit to experiment a bit. Here's what I have tried so far:
     
    DRYBRUSIHING:
    I already struggled with drybrushing. This is a method I used already 20 years ago, but for some reason it didn't work properly this time. Maybe because I was trying to use enmael over acrylics? The edges became shiny, but not really lighter as almost no paint was deposited. Maybe I used the wrong paint or should have waited longer so that the brush dries a bit more before I started. Any good advice?
     
    WASH:
    I used an AK Interactive black wash and applied it with a small brush, which worked quite well. I didn't even have to remove the excess, but could merge the wash with the brush.
     
    DIRT:
    I used a sand colored wash by AK Interactive that I applied with a small brush to the cockpit floow. The color was probably a bit too light. Anyhow, it worked also quite well, but I remember having seen better results, but I don't know how they were achieved (possibly pastel or pigments?).
     
    CHIPPING:
    I applied very moderate chipping using a silver pencil. It worked well, but the chips are not as sharp edged as you probably can achieve using other methods. What are your recommendations for chipping inside the cockpit?
     
    SHADING:
    I haven't tried it yet, but was considering using the airbrush and highly diluted black paint to add some shades to panel and corners. Will have to try it I guess.
     
    Spent a whole evening for what is probably basics for most of you, but that's part of the learning. Next time I will know a bit more and be a bit faster. Would appreciate your thoughts about how best to weather the cockpit (not overdone, but still adding depth and character).
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

  13. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from airscale in 1/18 Spitfire Mk. XIVe - Race #80   
    Hi Peter,
     
    I'd go for a bare metal Me 262... if I had your skills that is :-)
     
    Cheers
    Roger
  14. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    I probably will lighten up the color a bit before adding shades again. In reality it is lighter than it appears in the last photo, but since it will be quite dark anyways in the cockpit, it's probably good to lighten the color a bit. 
     
    Here's a fragment of a main instrument panel of a Bf 109 G just to show how dark RLM 66 was (compare RLM 66 with the black instruments): 
     

     
    By the way, the rpm indicator and fuel gauge were not the ones originally installed in the panel, as they were for a Bf 109 K-4 (rpm indicator) and Fw 190 (fuel gauge). The manifold pressure indicator is the correct one for a Bf 109 G-6 and may have been the original one that had been installed in this panel.
     
    Is drybrushing still the standard method for bringing out highlights (if so, I assume Enmael over Acrylics should work ok for drybrushing)? I also may add chipping using a silver pen and adding dirt using e.g. AK Interactive dust.
     
    Do you have some recommendations how to make the cockpit more realistic looking?
  15. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening everybody,
     
    Tonight I have used an airbrush for the first time in more than 20 years and it was even a first for me when it comes to using acrylic paint.
     
    I primed the resin parts using Mr. Surfacer 1500 Black using a 2:1 ratio (i.e. 2 drops of Mr. Levelling Thinner and 1 drop of Mr. Surfacer), which went quite well. 
     
    I then painted the cockpits with Mr. Color RLM 66 using a 1:1 ratio with Mr. Color thinner, which also went well. The photos don't really show much difference between black and grey, but in reality the colours are clearly different.
     
    I might have used a too high pressure (2 bars) since when I pulled the trigger on the airbrush too much rearwards, it started to "spit" a bit. But all was fine at a low setting. 
     
    The black primer already gives some shades and depth to the cockpit. I will try to increase this effect a bit in the next step using the Revell cockpit always as a Guinea Pig.
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     
     

     

  16. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    Again, not a big progress, but I have ordered some Mr. Surfacer 1500 for priming and am waiting to use my new airbrush for the first time. I will use the Revell cockpit for practice first before I have a go on the Eduard cockpit. I have installed the map holder made out of a photo etched part. As soon as the primer arrives, I'll post an update.
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

     

  17. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    Just a tiny update: instrument panel and seat cushion cut and sanded. Note the correct selection for an Fw 190 F-8 of the auxiliary panel with the ASK190 bomb sequence selector and ZSK 244.
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

  18. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from MikeC in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Hi Filippo,
     
    I will most likely go for the complete aircraft like it was captured at Lippstadt since this will be my first build in a long time. But the idea to display it in the disassembled state at Namur is tempting.
     
    Ciao, Roger
  19. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from GDW in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Thanks Kev!
     
    Here are some photos of White 48, W.Nr. 587108 taken at Namur, Belgium:
     

     

  20. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from TenSeven in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    So, here I am. More than 20 years after I built my last model. Ever since I have been a keen follower of forums and magazines, but due to lack of a convenient hobby room I have never returned to modelling. Until last month when we moved into our own house WITH a hobby room all for myself 
     
    Some may know my book 'Captured Eagles Vol. 1' that I published in 2011. How time flies! I am still working on Vol. 2, but will definitely publish it at some point in time. Anyhow, my first try is with a Revell 1/32 Fw 190 F-8 kit and in addition some detail sets.
     
    Since Fw 190 F-8 'White 48' was not only a central part of my first book, I will even have an original color shot of that aircraft to show in 'Vol. 2'! So, even though I find the Luftflotte 4 Schlachtgeschwader Fw 190 F-8 very attractive, I most likely will go for 'White 48'. 'White 48' was captured at Lippstadt, Germany, but was for some unknown reason later flown or transported to Namur, Belgium. Several photographs taken at both locations are known. 
     
    Please be gentle with me. I haven't put my fingers onto a plastic model for more than 20 years. Not a lot of progress to report in my first post, but I hope to show more progress soon. 
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     

     

     

     

  21. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Tolga ULGUR in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening everybody,
     
    Tonight I have used an airbrush for the first time in more than 20 years and it was even a first for me when it comes to using acrylic paint.
     
    I primed the resin parts using Mr. Surfacer 1500 Black using a 2:1 ratio (i.e. 2 drops of Mr. Levelling Thinner and 1 drop of Mr. Surfacer), which went quite well. 
     
    I then painted the cockpits with Mr. Color RLM 66 using a 1:1 ratio with Mr. Color thinner, which also went well. The photos don't really show much difference between black and grey, but in reality the colours are clearly different.
     
    I might have used a too high pressure (2 bars) since when I pulled the trigger on the airbrush too much rearwards, it started to "spit" a bit. But all was fine at a low setting. 
     
    The black primer already gives some shades and depth to the cockpit. I will try to increase this effect a bit in the next step using the Revell cockpit always as a Guinea Pig.
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     
     

     

  22. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from MikeC in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening everybody,
     
    Tonight I have used an airbrush for the first time in more than 20 years and it was even a first for me when it comes to using acrylic paint.
     
    I primed the resin parts using Mr. Surfacer 1500 Black using a 2:1 ratio (i.e. 2 drops of Mr. Levelling Thinner and 1 drop of Mr. Surfacer), which went quite well. 
     
    I then painted the cockpits with Mr. Color RLM 66 using a 1:1 ratio with Mr. Color thinner, which also went well. The photos don't really show much difference between black and grey, but in reality the colours are clearly different.
     
    I might have used a too high pressure (2 bars) since when I pulled the trigger on the airbrush too much rearwards, it started to "spit" a bit. But all was fine at a low setting. 
     
    The black primer already gives some shades and depth to the cockpit. I will try to increase this effect a bit in the next step using the Revell cockpit always as a Guinea Pig.
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     
     

     

  23. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from GDW in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    So, here I am. More than 20 years after I built my last model. Ever since I have been a keen follower of forums and magazines, but due to lack of a convenient hobby room I have never returned to modelling. Until last month when we moved into our own house WITH a hobby room all for myself 
     
    Some may know my book 'Captured Eagles Vol. 1' that I published in 2011. How time flies! I am still working on Vol. 2, but will definitely publish it at some point in time. Anyhow, my first try is with a Revell 1/32 Fw 190 F-8 kit and in addition some detail sets.
     
    Since Fw 190 F-8 'White 48' was not only a central part of my first book, I will even have an original color shot of that aircraft to show in 'Vol. 2'! So, even though I find the Luftflotte 4 Schlachtgeschwader Fw 190 F-8 very attractive, I most likely will go for 'White 48'. 'White 48' was captured at Lippstadt, Germany, but was for some unknown reason later flown or transported to Namur, Belgium. Several photographs taken at both locations are known. 
     
    Please be gentle with me. I haven't put my fingers onto a plastic model for more than 20 years. Not a lot of progress to report in my first post, but I hope to show more progress soon. 
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     

     

     

     

  24. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from Tolga ULGUR in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    Again, not a big progress, but I have ordered some Mr. Surfacer 1500 for priming and am waiting to use my new airbrush for the first time. I will use the Revell cockpit for practice first before I have a go on the Eduard cockpit. I have installed the map holder made out of a photo etched part. As soon as the primer arrives, I'll post an update.
     
    Cheers,
    Roger
     

     

  25. Like
    VintageEagle got a reaction from sandokan in 1/32 Revell Fw 190 F-8 & A-8: Working on the wheel wells!   
    Good evening,
     
    So, here I am. More than 20 years after I built my last model. Ever since I have been a keen follower of forums and magazines, but due to lack of a convenient hobby room I have never returned to modelling. Until last month when we moved into our own house WITH a hobby room all for myself 
     
    Some may know my book 'Captured Eagles Vol. 1' that I published in 2011. How time flies! I am still working on Vol. 2, but will definitely publish it at some point in time. Anyhow, my first try is with a Revell 1/32 Fw 190 F-8 kit and in addition some detail sets.
     
    Since Fw 190 F-8 'White 48' was not only a central part of my first book, I will even have an original color shot of that aircraft to show in 'Vol. 2'! So, even though I find the Luftflotte 4 Schlachtgeschwader Fw 190 F-8 very attractive, I most likely will go for 'White 48'. 'White 48' was captured at Lippstadt, Germany, but was for some unknown reason later flown or transported to Namur, Belgium. Several photographs taken at both locations are known. 
     
    Please be gentle with me. I haven't put my fingers onto a plastic model for more than 20 years. Not a lot of progress to report in my first post, but I hope to show more progress soon. 
     
    Cheers,
     
    Roger
     

     

     

     

     

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