Jump to content
dpastern

Masking technique idea for canopies

Recommended Posts

First clean off the canopy with alcohol not soap and water, than sort of warm up a piece of PARAFILM "M" between your hands then strech it gently first with the grain then strech it leagth ways do this a few times till you get as thin as you want it but be carful that you don't tear it as it sometimes will do if streched to thin. then carfully place it over the canopy and pull it tight so there are no wrinkels smooth the first layer down making sure their are no air bubbles then apply a second layer same as the first. use a new X-acto blade and cut to a corner lightly I've left the Parafilm on the canopy for a month or longer after painting and had no problem removing it,I use a tooth pick cut to a chisel point to remove it. practice first try it you'll love it

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Paul. I'll give it another go at some point using your tips, but it still sounds more difficult than using Bare Metal Foil - though I can see that it would definitely handle compound curves better.

 

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a new kind of flexible masking tape from Tamiya, a kind of vinyl dedicated to masking curves. It's a very good product and masking curves become way easier than with kabuki tape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a new kind of flexible masking tape from Tamiya, a kind of vinyl dedicated to masking curves. It's a very good product and masking curves become way easier than with kabuki tape.

 

This is the link I found:

 

http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/87177_87179/index.htm

 

Would like it wider than 5 mm though...

 

Sounds interesting, must keep an eye out for it.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First clean off the canopy with alcohol not soap and water, than sort of warm up a piece of PARAFILM "M" between your hands then strech it gently first with the grain then strech it leagth ways do this a few times till you get as thin as you want it but be carful that you don't tear it as it sometimes will do if streched to thin. then carfully place it over the canopy and pull it tight so there are no wrinkels smooth the first layer down making sure their are no air bubbles then apply a second layer same as the first. use a new X-acto blade and cut to a corner lightly I've left the Parafilm on the canopy for a month or longer after painting and had no problem removing it,I use a tooth pick cut to a chisel point to remove it. practice first try it you'll love it

 

Paul

 

Thanks for posting this - I'll have to get my hands on some parafilm "M" (which version, laboratory, nursery, etc?) and test it in the future.  For now, I'll stick to trying the Tamiya masking tape/cut and will test out BMF too.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this - I'll have to get my hands on some parafilm "M" (which version, laboratory, nursery, etc?) and test it in the future.  For now, I'll stick to trying the Tamiya masking tape/cut and will test out BMF too.

 

Dave

I bought mine off the web on e-bay 250 feet for about $26.00 6-7 years ago got the Laboratory 2in roll.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the ones who use Bare Metal Foil (teh self adhasive thing) for masking, I have a question: I have tried it once on a canopy and the masking ability of the metarial was excellent. I was able to trim it easily. But when I have removed it, it left a lot of adhasive residue on the canopy, which I was not able to clean without destroying paint job. How do you guys solve this residual adhasive problem?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the ones who use Bare Metal Foil (teh self adhasive thing) for masking, I have a question: I have tried it once on a canopy and the masking ability of the metarial was excellent. I was able to trim it easily. But when I have removed it, it left a lot of adhasive residue on the canopy, which I was not able to clean without destroying paint job. How do you guys solve this residual adhasive problem?

 

 

I too have found the same thing. When using BMF for masking I found it to cut very cleanly and easily with a new #11, and really no bleeding to speak of, but when you remove it it does leave residue, and is not really removable except by things like 90% alcohol and the like.

 

I personally still like to use Future for my canopies, as I like to use ultra thin CA to join canopies and windscreens, and if you use BMF as a masking material on a canopy with Future on it, the BMF REALLY janks up the Future bad.

I have quite using BMF as a masking tool as the adhesion properties are just too strong for me.................and this makes sense if you think about it.......................................BMF is "technically" a tape, but UNLIKE tape,  the adhesion properties are designed to be more permanent than temporary.

 

I found plain old Tamiya rice tape works way better overall for a canopies and windscreen masking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the link I found:

 

http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/87177_87179/index.htm

 

Would like it wider than 5 mm though...

 

Sounds interesting, must keep an eye out for it.

 

Dave

 

It may not be so flexible over 5mm width.

I have the 2mm, but as soon as i find some on a webshop where i have an order to make, i'd order some 1mm. (it seems out of stock in many places)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the ones who use Bare Metal Foil (teh self adhasive thing) for masking, I have a question: I have tried it once on a canopy and the masking ability of the metarial was excellent. I was able to trim it easily. But when I have removed it, it left a lot of adhasive residue on the canopy, which I was not able to clean without destroying paint job. How do you guys solve this residual adhasive problem?

 

yes, this was something that I was thinking of too.  In Paul Budzik's video, he mentions he cleans the residue with alcohol.  Will isopropyl alcohol do the trick, or is something else better?  My main concerns are twofold:

 

1) damaging the clear plastic material itself

 

2) damaging any paint job...

 

how to avoid?

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For cleaning BMF residue, I use WD40. It's harmless against acrylic paints, but has the potential to damage enamel finishes. But it not only removes the residue, but leaves a lovely glossy finish that really looks great to my eye.

 

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the welcome message and the replies guys:)

 

As for WD40, I think I would give it a try, I generally use acrylic paint for my models. But I guess IPA is a no go for any kind of paint because it removes acrylics, enamels and even cellulose based paints to an extend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...