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WNW Sopwith Tripe is released!

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Guest Peterpools

Added to the "To Buy" list. I have a WNW double kit on the way now.

Peter

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Got one inbound too, now I really have to finish the dh2 soon! Probably makes sense to build the tripe alongside the pup, no? seems it'd speed up the building of both that way

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I can probably resist another British subject.....never really did it for me. The D.VII has been listed as soon for a while, but this is the first I've seen that they posted a completed one, so that's a good sign. I'll probably order a handful of them, as I can see them as a future sold out kit....I figure I'll need 3 or 4....one to build, one to hold on to, and the rest to pass off.

 

C

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I'll probably order a handful of them, as I can see them as a future sold out kit...

 

Im not so sure on that..................the other two sold out WnW kits are IMHO definitely kits that are (normally when they were IN stock that is) not as coveted or nearly as popular as some of the other kits like the SE 5, Albatros, DH 2, Gotha, pup and especially the forthcoming D VII.

 

I think they will have plenty of the D VIIs for quite a while, just like I dont expect WnW to run out of pups or Albatri (plural of Albatros?) anytime soon.

 

Although Ive not build any, I have a WnW Albatros in the stash and have a DH 2 and an early E III on the way............but I think Ive been MOST looking forward to the D VII. I have no desire or use for more than one, as I buy only to build, but it has a very strong appeal IMHO with its cool lines, no rigging and wonderful schemes..........

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I might have to respectfully disagree about the LVG and HB. Floatplanes have a huge following from WWI guys and are typically very hot sellers, especially German ones. Every WWI friend I spoke to was stoked about the LVG and those 2 were easily the tops on everyone's list who was a dedicated WWI guy. Guys outside of the WWI community tend to think only Fokkers and Albatros' sell, but that just isn't true. To many, Fokker's and Sopwiths are about as exciting as Bf-109's. Nice to do sometimes, but chances are good that someone else will do a good kit of them. Actually, surprised nobody's done a D.VII yet, especially since Roden had good success with their 1/48 ones until the Eduard kits came along.

 

I agree that WNW will likely have a much larger production run of Fokkers, but still, I doubt these kits will be around forever and I doubt even more so that anyone will come out with something much better in this scale, in this genre any time soon. I'd have to think they'd make a solid investment (to recycle the money into more model kits, of course) within the next 5 years. Especially judging by the crazy money the HB's are going for on ebay. I've been watching for a month or two, and they've consistently gone for $250-$350.

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I'm on the same page as csavaglio. Most guys in the USA, at least, are WW2 and after modelers. Few are into the history of WW1 aviation. So the average modeler thinks that the sum of WW1 aircraft are a few fighters and that is it. They never even heard of the two place aircraft, most know only the fighters, like the Spads, Nieuports, SE-5s, Camels and Fokker Triplane and D.VII. Starting in the 1950s with Aurora's 1/48 kits almost only fighters were available in WW1 aircraft. Very few bombers. So how is the average modeler to even know other aircraft existed?

 

In the first place, the most important job of the aircraft in WW1, especially in the beginning years, was observation, reconnaissance and photography. The nature of the static warfare placed a great demand on the air services to supply info on the location and activity of the enemy forces. Thus the most important aircraft were the two place observation aircraft. The function of the single place fighter aircraft was to shoot down the other side's recon craft (and observation balloons) so they could not supply the needed info to the generals. The other function of the fighter was to protect their own sides observation craft by shooting down the enemy's fighters. Only much later in the war did the ground attack role of the fighter and bomber aircraft gain some importance.

 

The single place fighter aircraft, fighting mano-a-mano like the knights of olden days, caught everyone's imagination and got a lot of attention in the press and in the pilot schools. Look at the movies of the 1920-1930 era. They were all about the brave knights in their single seat fighters, when in actuality the WW1 fighters had essentially a secondary role. If a fighter pilot became an ace by shooting down a bunch of fighters and in doing so failed to protect the observation aircraft what good was he? The function of the fighter aircraft was to gain air superiority so the observation craft could do their jobs.

 

Thus I am not surprised that the multi-seat aircraft models are being sold out. I'll bet the modelers who are savvy about the history of WW1 aviation are those who are buying these two seat aircraft models.

 

I salute WingnutWings for producing 1/32 scale models kits of the important aircraft of WW1, the two seat observation aeroplanes.

 

Stephen

 

P.S. If you want to get an understanding of the role of the WW1 observation aircraft read Bloody April: Slaughter in the Skies Over Arras, 1917, by Peter Hart. This is one of the best books on the subject. I found my copy on www.bookfinder.com.

 

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P.S. If you want to get an understanding of the role of the WW1 observation aircraft read Bloody April: Slaughter in the Skies Over Arras, 1917, by Peter Hart. This is one of the best books on the subject. I found my copy on www.bookfinder.com.

 

 

And I second Stephen's mention of the Hart citation above. Hart also did _Somme Surprise_ which covers 1916 and the ascendancy of the RFC; he also did one called _Aces Falling_ that deals with 1918 and how the war in the air transitioned from the "single combat" model to a more industrial type of combat with large formations patrolling and bombing and the individual "knight of the air" becoming less relevant (as well as dying off in record numbers).

 

Tim W.

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I really had not planned on buying a Tripe until I saw the markings for Kurt Wusthoff's captured plane. I guess an Iron Cross not only makes everything look better, it also helped to lighten my wallet.

:thumbsup:

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Guest Dekenba

I was not going to buy it because British WW1 aeroplanes look a little dull due to colourings and markings.

 

Then WNW decide to offer a GERMAN marking option for the Triplane.

 

Bugger!

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I was not going to buy it because British WW1 aeroplanes look a little dull due to colourings and markings.

 

Then WNW decide to offer a GERMAN marking option for the Triplane.

 

Bugger!

 

While I basically agree, one look at the Pup that Jeroen is doing changes all that. It seems an attractive WWI British aircraft can be had.

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