Jump to content
Lee White

YAK-38

Recommended Posts

Lee,

As to the yak being a 1/2 a kit.What did u use for the nose sections as to the two piece fuselage.The rest from what i have seen is very easy and the use of the F-15 wings is also easy and even could be made from sheet.And is there any way to get a copy of the plans u have as to copying and enlarging.Larry

 

Larry,

 

The nose section would be included. 2 nose sections, 2 aft sections, 2 intakes, and a canopy make up the whole shebang.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lee, it occures to me that you may get more milage out of the balsa molds if you were to paint it with epoxy and then wet sand them. It would harden up the surfaces to better withstand the process.

 

So far your model is coming along just wonderfully. Keep it up.

 

Sabre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sabre,

By any chance as to what type of epoxy one would brush on to the balsawood surface.I have asked this question at three different types of hardware stores and they never seem to know.Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lee, it occures to me that you may get more milage out of the balsa molds if you were to paint it with epoxy and then wet sand them. It would harden up the surfaces to better withstand the process.

 

So far your model is coming along just wonderfully. Keep it up.

 

Sabre

 

That is interesting Sabre - I do the same thing with superglue (Cyanoacrylite) - especially if it is old and going-off a bit. A few coats, followed by sanding (and it does take a fair amount of effort) produces a glass like appearance (and almost as hard!).

 

One of thr reasons I use old, or thicker viscosity of Cyano, is because if you use fresh, very thin, Cyano, it dries so fast within the balsa wood fibres that it becomes very hot - to the point that the wood beginse to smoke - so you have been warned!

 

I tried epoxy before, it does work, but leaves to many air bubbles for my liking. I find warming up the epoxy on a radiator for a while after mixing it really thins it to the point that it is easily purable, and soaks into the balsa really well.

 

HTH

 

Derek

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used West Systems two-part Epoxy resin with great success. It is expensive, as you have to buy it from West Marine stores, but it does work. Experimental aircraft builders here use it all the time for composite layups- Thin enough to be brushed, sands nicely, but does dry really hard- Also permeates balsa fairly well-

 

THOR :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an update- I was able to put in an honest 4-hours yesterday, and am happy with the progress. You can see me mess-ups on the nose section pretty well, as seen by the abundance of tan and black epoxy putty bits. More sculpture than model with that stuff. :blink:

post-81-1229642026.jpg

post-81-1229642046.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey guys,

 

 

long time no post! :( Thankfully, i'll be able to post some pics soon- the Yak is assembled, primed, and awaiting some scribing. Don't know if I'll make the deadline, but it will be close!!! I have some progress pics I'll try to load tomorrow-

 

Lee :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is brilliant work :o I'm loving the way you've broken the fuselage down to fit on your machine, and it still fits back together! Can't wait to see your latest pics.

 

Have you tried using authomoive laquer to seal and strengthen the wooden moulds? I've had decent success with this method - it leaves a hard smooth finish after a couple of coats and sanding, although my application was slightly different (scratchbuilt electric guitar :rolleyes: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is brilliant work :o I'm loving the way you've broken the fuselage down to fit on your machine, and it still fits back together! Can't wait to see your latest pics.

 

Have you tried using authomoive laquer to seal and strengthen the wooden moulds? I've had decent success with this method - it leaves a hard smooth finish after a couple of coats and sanding, although my application was slightly different (scratchbuilt electric guitar :rolleyes: )

 

Hi Butler,

 

 

Thanks for your kind words. I have been watching your Meteor build, and am awestruck by the ingenuity involved in making it. That is modelling!! :o

 

I might try the auto lacquer, if I can firm up the molds without many hours of work. model time is a t a premuim now, can't afford to lose too much!!!

 

Thanks for noticing the breakdown of the parts- my idea was to assemble the aft fuse first, then add the intakes. These were easy to line up, as I could refernce them against plans, then each other to make them symetrical. Te resultant gap was wide enough for the forward fuse, and the intakes prevented the forward section fron "yawing" or "rolling", and some close work with a straightedge kept it from "pitching" so it was lined up in all 3 axis.

 

I plan on using this on my next home-brewed model, which I think will be a 1/32 TSR.2, but i have to find some refs first. ;)

 

 

Lee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...