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pvanroy

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  1. Thanks
    pvanroy got a reaction from Rick Griewski in Das Werk 1/32 Ju EF-126 „Elli“ / EF-127 „Walli“ (3 in 1) Announced!   
    Was about to post this myself  
     
    The EF 126 was a design for a cheap, semi-expendable close-support and ground attack aircraft. Work was continued at Dessau under Soviet supervision after the war, and four prototypes (V1, 3, 4 and 5) were completed during 1946. V1 was flown as an unpowered glider, V3-5 were powered and tested at Ramenskoye in the USSR. They only accumulated a limited amount of flying time (in the order of three hours IIRC), being towed into the air by a Ju 88G-6 because of a lack of suitable booster rockets to allow an independent take off. The main outcome of those flights was to prove the unsuitability of pulsejets for powering manned aircraft, and the project was effectively shelved at the end of 1947, being officially terminated in 1948. Apart from its impracticability, the rapid evolution of much more advanced jet powered aircraft had rendered a crude, simple machine like the EF 126 of little interest.
     
    The EF 127 was a rocket powered interceptor derivative of the EF 126. It was supposed to be powered by the Walter HWK 109-509C, but no prototypes were ever constructed.
  2. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Astro32 in Me-163 Komet question   
    Ransom & Cammann (2003, p. 411) has three photographs and a profile of W.Nr. 191659 after its arrival in the U.K., but in its original Luftwaffe markings before restoration. I've taken a quick snap of the page which you can download here:
     
    https://yadi.sk/i/pMYl9v-pfxQVwQ
     
    Let me know if you need a better image, I can have the page scanned.
     
    Reference:
     
    Ransom, S. & Cammann, H.-H. 2003. Me 163 Rocket Interceptor. Volume Two. Hersham, U. K.: Classic Publications (Ian Allan Publishing). 220 pp.
  3. Like
    pvanroy reacted to MikeMaben in Messerschmitt Bf 109E-5 JG26   
    OK here's one ...
     

     
  4. Like
    pvanroy reacted to RLWP in Messerschmitt Bf 109E-5 JG26   
    Right, this is the step I could have avoided if I had started with an E-1, removing the cannon bulges:
     

     
    Bits and bobs on the cockpit sides:
     

     
    And a smartened up seat:
     

     
    Richard
  5. Like
    pvanroy reacted to RLWP in Messerschmitt Bf 109E-5 JG26   
    I launched this query earlier in May to gather information - I haven't been disappointed!
     
    I'm planning to build this aeroplane:
     

     

     
    using the Eduard BF 109E-3 Weekend kit. If I had done my research first, I'd have looked for an E-1 kit instead. No matter, a bit of filing and scribing will sort the wings
     
    I've got the kit, some paint, a set of decals, a couple of books and both the Weekend and Profilpack instruction sheets. And a bucket of enthusiasm
     
    Richard
  6. Thanks
    pvanroy got a reaction from Rick Griewski in Das Werk 1/32 Ju EF-126 „Elli“ / EF-127 „Walli“ (3 in 1) Announced!   
    Actually, looking at references and photos of the actual aircraft, it seems the only version that can be built accurately from this kit is the single pulsejet machine as constructed for and tested by the Soviets during 1946-47. And even that would still require some modifications (repositioning the horizontal tailplane, extending the central fin forward, reshaping the outer stabilizing fins, and extending the aerodynamic fairing behind the skid).
     
    Photographs of one of the three powered prototypes tested by the Soviets in 1947: 
     
    http://www.airwar.ru/image/idop/xplane/ef126/ef126-3.jpg
     
    http://www.airwar.ru/image/idop/xplane/ef126/ef126-4.jpg
     
  7. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Kagemusha in Spitfire Mk24 - the best route?   
    You may be interested in Phil Listemann's booklet on the Spitfire F.24 (Allied wings 18):
     
    https://www.raf-in-combat.com/downloads/aw18-the-supermarine-spitfire-f-24/
     
    This booklet has a photo of VN 496 on p. 21, and a profile of this machine at the end. Also note that late production F.24s used the same gear covers as the Seafire FR.47.
     
     
  8. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    As far as I'm aware, all documentary evidence (color photos and crash reports) suggests that Erla G-10s from the 490XXX (September 1944 - November 1944); 491XXX (December 1944 - January 1945), 150XXX (December 1944 - January 1945) and part of the 151XXX (December 1944 - March 1945) block were camouflaged in the old scheme of RLM 74/75/76. So, in fact, it seems that the majority of Erla G-10 was finished in the classical RLM 74/75/76 scheme.
     
    At some point in the 151XXX block (probably February-March 1945), Erla switched to a solid coat of RLM 81 on the top surfaces and sides. The top color usually also wrapped around the rear fuselage; undersides of the wings and cowl were left unpainted. In a few cases, a pattern of RLM 81/82 may have been used on some machines.
     
    As regards the wing bulges: early machines produced by Erla (blocks 490XXX and 491XXX) had small wing bulges and regular 660 X 160 wheels; later Erla G-10s had the large rectangular bulges and oversized 660 X 190 wheels. So, the rectangular bulges by themselves aren't wrong for an Erla G-10 - but are only appropriate for the later machines. Hartmann's aircraft was from an earlier production block, and had the small bumps and wheels, so that specific airframe can't be built straight out of the box from the Revell kit - you either need to get the upper wing inserts with small bulges from the Revell G-6, or get the Barracuda Cast inserts.
  9. Thanks
    pvanroy got a reaction from nmayhew in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    As far as I'm aware, all documentary evidence (color photos and crash reports) suggests that Erla G-10s from the 490XXX (September 1944 - November 1944); 491XXX (December 1944 - January 1945), 150XXX (December 1944 - January 1945) and part of the 151XXX (December 1944 - March 1945) block were camouflaged in the old scheme of RLM 74/75/76. So, in fact, it seems that the majority of Erla G-10 was finished in the classical RLM 74/75/76 scheme.
     
    At some point in the 151XXX block (probably February-March 1945), Erla switched to a solid coat of RLM 81 on the top surfaces and sides. The top color usually also wrapped around the rear fuselage; undersides of the wings and cowl were left unpainted. In a few cases, a pattern of RLM 81/82 may have been used on some machines.
     
    As regards the wing bulges: early machines produced by Erla (blocks 490XXX and 491XXX) had small wing bulges and regular 660 X 160 wheels; later Erla G-10s had the large rectangular bulges and oversized 660 X 190 wheels. So, the rectangular bulges by themselves aren't wrong for an Erla G-10 - but are only appropriate for the later machines. Hartmann's aircraft was from an earlier production block, and had the small bumps and wheels, so that specific airframe can't be built straight out of the box from the Revell kit - you either need to get the upper wing inserts with small bulges from the Revell G-6, or get the Barracuda Cast inserts.
  10. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Kais in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    As far as I'm aware, all documentary evidence (color photos and crash reports) suggests that Erla G-10s from the 490XXX (September 1944 - November 1944); 491XXX (December 1944 - January 1945), 150XXX (December 1944 - January 1945) and part of the 151XXX (December 1944 - March 1945) block were camouflaged in the old scheme of RLM 74/75/76. So, in fact, it seems that the majority of Erla G-10 was finished in the classical RLM 74/75/76 scheme.
     
    At some point in the 151XXX block (probably February-March 1945), Erla switched to a solid coat of RLM 81 on the top surfaces and sides. The top color usually also wrapped around the rear fuselage; undersides of the wings and cowl were left unpainted. In a few cases, a pattern of RLM 81/82 may have been used on some machines.
     
    As regards the wing bulges: early machines produced by Erla (blocks 490XXX and 491XXX) had small wing bulges and regular 660 X 160 wheels; later Erla G-10s had the large rectangular bulges and oversized 660 X 190 wheels. So, the rectangular bulges by themselves aren't wrong for an Erla G-10 - but are only appropriate for the later machines. Hartmann's aircraft was from an earlier production block, and had the small bumps and wheels, so that specific airframe can't be built straight out of the box from the Revell kit - you either need to get the upper wing inserts with small bulges from the Revell G-6, or get the Barracuda Cast inserts.
  11. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Hartmann52 in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    As far as I'm aware, all documentary evidence (color photos and crash reports) suggests that Erla G-10s from the 490XXX (September 1944 - November 1944); 491XXX (December 1944 - January 1945), 150XXX (December 1944 - January 1945) and part of the 151XXX (December 1944 - March 1945) block were camouflaged in the old scheme of RLM 74/75/76. So, in fact, it seems that the majority of Erla G-10 was finished in the classical RLM 74/75/76 scheme.
     
    At some point in the 151XXX block (probably February-March 1945), Erla switched to a solid coat of RLM 81 on the top surfaces and sides. The top color usually also wrapped around the rear fuselage; undersides of the wings and cowl were left unpainted. In a few cases, a pattern of RLM 81/82 may have been used on some machines.
     
    As regards the wing bulges: early machines produced by Erla (blocks 490XXX and 491XXX) had small wing bulges and regular 660 X 160 wheels; later Erla G-10s had the large rectangular bulges and oversized 660 X 190 wheels. So, the rectangular bulges by themselves aren't wrong for an Erla G-10 - but are only appropriate for the later machines. Hartmann's aircraft was from an earlier production block, and had the small bumps and wheels, so that specific airframe can't be built straight out of the box from the Revell kit - you either need to get the upper wing inserts with small bulges from the Revell G-6, or get the Barracuda Cast inserts.
  12. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    Hartmann's aircraft was an early Erla-produced G-10. If I'm not mistaken, research has shown that early Erla machines were camouflaged in the old 74/75/76 scheme. At some point in the 151XXX W.Nr. block, Erla switched over to a solid application of 81, or possibly 81/82 in some machines. Have a look at the links, they may be of use:
     
    https://falkeeins.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-last-bf-109-g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-bf109g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2014/03/barracuda-studios-bf109g-10-erla-decals.html
     
  13. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Out2gtcha in Das Werk 1/32 Ju EF-126 „Elli“ / EF-127 „Walli“ (3 in 1) Announced!   
    The fuselage has stressed skin effects. Video preview of box contents:
     
     
  14. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Kais in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    Hartmann's aircraft was an early Erla-produced G-10. If I'm not mistaken, research has shown that early Erla machines were camouflaged in the old 74/75/76 scheme. At some point in the 151XXX W.Nr. block, Erla switched over to a solid application of 81, or possibly 81/82 in some machines. Have a look at the links, they may be of use:
     
    https://falkeeins.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-last-bf-109-g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-bf109g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2014/03/barracuda-studios-bf109g-10-erla-decals.html
     
  15. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from LSP_K2 in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  16. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Martinnfb in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  17. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Stefano in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  18. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from Lothar in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  19. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from D.B. Andrus in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  20. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from crobinsonh in Trumpeter 1/24th Bf-109   
    Do you need to know what the different bits that are arrowed in the image are? In that case:
     
    1. UV light. These could be aimed at the instrument panel, to excite the radium paint on the instrument dials, for night / low light flying.
    2. Emergency undercarriage lowering lever.
    3. Flare port. A flare pistol would be attached here.
    4. Another UV light, see 1.
    5. Manual control for the radiator flaps.
    6. Emergency jettison of stores.
    7. Radiator cut-off valve control. In the majority of Bf 109s produced, the radiators could not be shut off from each other. This meant that, if one of the radiators got punctured, the aircraft would lose its coolant very quickly. Messerschmitt therefore developed radiator cut-off valves that allowed a damaged radiator to be shut off. However, for some unclear reason, these cut-off valves did not find widespread use, and they are a relatively rare fit.
    8. Windscreen rinsing tap. Opening the tap would spray fuel over the windscreen to remove oil and other dirt.
     
    Do note that the cockpit in the image is for a G-6. While the G-10 cockpit is largely similar, there are a number of differences.
  21. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from MikeC in Messerschmitt Bf 109E-5   
    Vogt (2012, p. 301) provides the following information (my translation from the original German):
     
    "The Bf 109 E-5 was converted from the Bf 109 E-1 into a tactical reconnaissance aircraft at the factory, and was likewise equipped with the DB 601 A. The camera installation of the Bf 109 E-5 consisted of a Rb 21/18 camera in the position where the FuG 7a was housed in the E-1 (fuselage sections 3 and 4). The film cassette contained 60 meters of film, which was sufficient for at least 300 images. Size of the images was 18 X 18 cm. Many losses of the Bf 109 E-5 were recorded in the Jagdgeschwadern. Why this aircraft was used in these units is unknown. A nice color image from JG 26 shows an E-5 with combat damage. It concerns Werk-Nummer 3891. The camera had a rectangular sheet metal cover to protect it from oil and dust. The pilot could mechanically open a sliding cover to expose the objective to take images. 
     
    Except for the camera installation, the E-5 was similar to the E-1. Only 29 aircraft were constructed, from which it can be assumed that this camera installation was unsuccessful. This also explains the use of this aircraft as a fighter by the Jagdgeschwadern. Many Bf 109 E-5 were converted / equipped to Bf 109 E-4 and E-7 standard by maintenance centers.
     
    Construction numbers: Arado      W.Nr. 3854 - 3919*     29 E-5      04.1940 - 06.1940      *includes also Bf 109 E-1
     
    Fuselage: In fuselage sections 3 and 4, a box was attached to the outside to protect the camera objective. A sliding cover was used to expose the objective. More details are unfortunately unknown. Otherwise unchanged from the fighter aircraft.
    Undercarriage: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Tail: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Controls: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Wings: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Engine: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Radio equipment: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Weapons: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Camera: Aerial mosaic camera Rb 21/18"
     
    The book also provides side and bottom line drawings of the fuselage, and an image of the instrument panel. The instrument panel was identical to the panel of the E-1, except for the addition of the camera control below the panel. The caption for the IP also notes that it is unknown on which side the lever to operate the camera cover was located.
     
    Radinger & Schick (1999, p. 92) essentially state the same:
     
    'Tactical reconnaissance aircraft. Similar to the E-1 with DB 601 A. For this mission the radio equipment in the fuselage was replaced with a Rb 21/18 camera. The camera operation was electric. The film cassette contained 60 meters of film, sufficient for approximately 300 photographs (18 X 18 cm).'
     
    On p. 104, these authors also note the delivery of 29 Bf 109 E-5 by Arado.
     
    References
     
    Radinger, W & Schick, W. 1999. Messerschmitt Bf 109 A - E. Development - Testing - Production. Altglen PA: Schiffer Military History. 136 pp.
     
    Vogt, H.H. 2012. Messerschmitt Bf 109. Einsatzmaschinen. Das Nachslagwerk. Zweibrücken: VDM Heinz Nickel. 384 pp.
     
  22. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from RLWP in Messerschmitt Bf 109E-5   
    Vogt (2012, p. 301) provides the following information (my translation from the original German):
     
    "The Bf 109 E-5 was converted from the Bf 109 E-1 into a tactical reconnaissance aircraft at the factory, and was likewise equipped with the DB 601 A. The camera installation of the Bf 109 E-5 consisted of a Rb 21/18 camera in the position where the FuG 7a was housed in the E-1 (fuselage sections 3 and 4). The film cassette contained 60 meters of film, which was sufficient for at least 300 images. Size of the images was 18 X 18 cm. Many losses of the Bf 109 E-5 were recorded in the Jagdgeschwadern. Why this aircraft was used in these units is unknown. A nice color image from JG 26 shows an E-5 with combat damage. It concerns Werk-Nummer 3891. The camera had a rectangular sheet metal cover to protect it from oil and dust. The pilot could mechanically open a sliding cover to expose the objective to take images. 
     
    Except for the camera installation, the E-5 was similar to the E-1. Only 29 aircraft were constructed, from which it can be assumed that this camera installation was unsuccessful. This also explains the use of this aircraft as a fighter by the Jagdgeschwadern. Many Bf 109 E-5 were converted / equipped to Bf 109 E-4 and E-7 standard by maintenance centers.
     
    Construction numbers: Arado      W.Nr. 3854 - 3919*     29 E-5      04.1940 - 06.1940      *includes also Bf 109 E-1
     
    Fuselage: In fuselage sections 3 and 4, a box was attached to the outside to protect the camera objective. A sliding cover was used to expose the objective. More details are unfortunately unknown. Otherwise unchanged from the fighter aircraft.
    Undercarriage: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Tail: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Controls: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Wings: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Engine: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Radio equipment: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Weapons: Unchanged from fighter E-1
    Camera: Aerial mosaic camera Rb 21/18"
     
    The book also provides side and bottom line drawings of the fuselage, and an image of the instrument panel. The instrument panel was identical to the panel of the E-1, except for the addition of the camera control below the panel. The caption for the IP also notes that it is unknown on which side the lever to operate the camera cover was located.
     
    Radinger & Schick (1999, p. 92) essentially state the same:
     
    'Tactical reconnaissance aircraft. Similar to the E-1 with DB 601 A. For this mission the radio equipment in the fuselage was replaced with a Rb 21/18 camera. The camera operation was electric. The film cassette contained 60 meters of film, sufficient for approximately 300 photographs (18 X 18 cm).'
     
    On p. 104, these authors also note the delivery of 29 Bf 109 E-5 by Arado.
     
    References
     
    Radinger, W & Schick, W. 1999. Messerschmitt Bf 109 A - E. Development - Testing - Production. Altglen PA: Schiffer Military History. 136 pp.
     
    Vogt, H.H. 2012. Messerschmitt Bf 109. Einsatzmaschinen. Das Nachslagwerk. Zweibrücken: VDM Heinz Nickel. 384 pp.
     
  23. Thanks
    pvanroy got a reaction from Hartmann52 in Bf-109G-10 "Erla", Erich Hartmann   
    Hartmann's aircraft was an early Erla-produced G-10. If I'm not mistaken, research has shown that early Erla machines were camouflaged in the old 74/75/76 scheme. At some point in the 151XXX W.Nr. block, Erla switched over to a solid application of 81, or possibly 81/82 in some machines. Have a look at the links, they may be of use:
     
    https://falkeeins.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-last-bf-109-g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2011/09/erich-hartmanns-bf109g-10.html
     
    http://theprofilepaintshop.blogspot.com/2014/03/barracuda-studios-bf109g-10-erla-decals.html
     
  24. Like
    pvanroy got a reaction from TAG in Some 109E questions.   
    Many thanks to both @williamj and  @TAG for this great information! David Wadman is a highly regarded researcher on Luftwaffe subjects in general and reconnaissance aircraft in particular, so that information is pretty authoritative! It would make sense for these kind of differences in finish to have been tied at least in part to manufacturer - in total, seven different production organisations were involved in 109E production (with three different concerns for the E-3 and E-4 subtypes - Mtt, WNF and Erla IIRC). On top of that, as williamj already pointed out, older airframes were indeed commonly recycled by upgrading them to later variants. I know the canopy framing on later G and K series was painted 66 inside and out and was often left like that, so it again makes sense to have a similar situation in the E. Thanks again!
  25. Thanks
    pvanroy reacted to TAG in Some 109E questions.   
    I copied this from a 10-year old thread on Luftwaffe colors at WW2aircraft.net, who in turn copied it from another thread elsewhere (threadception?). Apparently it comes from David Wadman, who's authored a few books on that very subject so I'd reckon it's backed by some solid research. Here you go, hope that helps!
     
    ---------------------------------------
     
    Beware the early/late split for 02/66. As part of a discussion elsewhere about early, BoB-era Ju88 interiors, which were certainly RLM66, this contribution was made by Dave Wadman regarding Bf 109’s of the same period.
    “In brief, research to date by my colleagues and I along with photographs and the information contained within copies of the relevant RLM Messerschmitt documentation in our files identifies the basic cockpit colour for the entire 109E, F-0 and the earliest F-1 series as 02 with the instrument panel in 66 although grey 41 is also mentioned in one reference to instrument panels fitted to early E-1s.
    However, while it is true that some E models did feature cockpits finished entirely in 66, this was due to which particular sub-contractor (e.g. Arado, Fiesler etc) built the airframe (regardless of sub-type) and not because of any directive, theatre of operation etc.
    Photographic evidence of 109’s brought down over the UK during the BoB where the interior of the cockpit is visible, clearly show that, while the sidewalls, seat etc are finished in 02, the cockpit sills and sloping area immediately behind the pilot’s shoulders was finished in a much darker colour, which was, in all probability, black-grey 66. Logic dictating that it was likely carried out for two simple reasons - to eliminate glare and to avoid compromising the dark(er) upper fuselage camouflage of the aircraft when viewed from above. Additionally and just to confuse matters further, several E variants brought down over the UK which bore 02 finished cockpits had very dark coloured floor panels suggesting the use of perhaps 66 or even black for these areas.
    Interestingly, every enemy aircraft that was brought down over the UK was extensively photographed in situ, the first being four basic views of the front, rear and port and starboard sides followed by areas of interest such as crew/cockpit areas etc. In such photos of 109s where the light grey (02) interior of the cockpit is clearly visible, several have the upper areas finished in a darker colour as mentioned above with a few, as also outlined above, having dark painted (i.e. 66) cockpits. This same is true in extant photos of many of the 109Es brought down, captured etc in the Mediterranean theatre, which, while retaining a basic 02 cockpit, have all areas above the pilot’s, shoulders painted in 66 or similar dark colour.
    As far as canopy framing goes, that for the early rounded style was generally finished in 02 but according to recent documentary evidence discovered by German and Dutch researchers, the heavier framed canopies were painted inside and out in 66 at the source of manufacture. The exterior framework often being left in this colour rather than being repainted to match the surrounding camouflage finish; this would then be the most likely explanation why many 109s with the heavier framed canopies are often seen with the exterior canopy framework much darker than the adjacent camouflage colour(s).
    For all subsequent Bf 109F, G & K variants with the exception of a few of the very earliest Bf 109F-1s, the entire cockpit, including seat was finished in 66, the same being generally true for all variants of the Fw 190 excluding the very early V (prototype) airframes.
    As a broad rule of thumb, 02 as a cockpit finish was ordered replaced by 66 in November 1941. However, if your chosen subject is to have an 02 cockpit, don't worry too much about the variety of shades of this colour available in model paints as the same inconsistencies occurred even with the real colour which led to the RLM sending out advisory notices on several occasions between mid-1941 and early 1944 quoting that no concern should be raised about the colour differences between batches of 02 citing such things as quality control etc, etc."
     
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