Jump to content
seiran01

The funny thing about 3d printing at home...

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, MARU5137 said:

Hello Mike..

 

ASTOUNDING  job..

:wow:

COOLEST thing ever. :goodjob: 

:clap2:

Are you going to take it Chattanooga  ipms   to  show the LSPers who are going...( you are going right ?). 

:whistle:

 

 

 

MARU, you are not coming over this side of the pond this year?  :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, CANicoll said:

You ARE bringing all of this to the next NoVa IPMS meeting in July, right??  :punk::m0152::fight:

Um yes! I’m doing the 3d printing presentation with Mikey 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Mike,

 

i need to ask the $1m question.   In no way am I critiquing anything in the making so far beyond what I’m already seeing.  I’m curious about the Z wobble you mentioned on the previous page for the wing section which you happened to show us.    Is this particular part going to be reprinted at some point or is it a work in progress and you will attempt to sand out the wobble and fill it in on this printed wing section?   I’m curious to know what the next step would be here?  

 

Im also curious to know what the actual cost in printing the largest section so far that you have made?   I haven’t a clue what this actual cost might be but if it’s for something unobtainable in 1:32nd who cares, right? 

 

I really am am enjoying this post.  Thanks for sharing your imagination and talent here!  

 

Troy 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

Imagine you were fluent in Mandarin Chinese (Adobe Illustrator), and you wanted to learn to communicate with somebody in Navajo.  :)

 

In a way, yes.

 

However, in my experience, being proficient at AI could save having to learn the shape drawing part of a 3D application. For instance, let's say you're going to make a bulkhead. If you're proficient in AI you can draw the shape along with any lightening holes, etc. in AI quickly, import it into the 3D/CAD program and extrude it to the thickness required avoiding how to learn the 3D/CAD program's drawing tools. I know that's a gross simplification, but presented here as one example. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Troy Molitor said:

Hey Mike,

 

i need to ask the $1m question.   In no way am I critiquing anything in the making so far beyond what I’m already seeing.  I’m curious about the Z wobble you mentioned on the previous page for the wing section which you happened to show us.    Is this particular part going to be reprinted at some point or is it a work in progress and you will attempt to sand out the wobble and fill it in on this printed wing section?   I’m curious to know what the next step would be here?  

 

Im also curious to know what the actual cost in printing the largest section so far that you have made?   I haven’t a clue what this actual cost might be but if it’s for something unobtainable in 1:32nd who cares, right? 

 

I really am am enjoying this post.  Thanks for sharing your imagination and talent here!  

 

Troy 

 

Good questions Troy,

ill be reprinting the stabilizer and the tail booms, still troubleshooting my friends photon S and we didn’t account for the very minimal shrinkage in the slot we made to insert the stab into the tails. Speaking of shrinkage, amount I’ve been seeing is practically negligible, in the range of 0.03%. This could be due to the type of resin and that I have not been “post curing” the parts in UV light where I believe things can shrink more. 

 

I’ve ordered a new two rail assembly for my printer which should significantly reduce any wobble. That said the wobble I’ve seen on my printer is only on the two wings and it’s very minimal compared to that stabilizer, easy to sand. Going to open up my friend’s printer and make sure all screws are tight as the wobble on that stabilizer is pretty extreme. 

 

Im estimating the cost for the airframe already printed at $40-45. Not counting the cost of lost resin from failed prints due to trouble calibrating and troubleshooting the second printer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

Imagine you were fluent in Mandarin Chinese (Adobe Illustrator), and you wanted to learn to communicate with somebody in Navajo.  :)

 

 

It isn't that bad!!!! You are still using a computer, keyboard and mouse!! No need to get a fire and a big blanket!!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Mike,

Thank you for your time and efforts explaining these finer details.  It’s a new venture in our hobby and we all learn from your experience at first hand. The machine seems to have its own limitations and this needs to be address into account as an important issue to know.  Experimentation is expected and I’m just happy to see your dreams and efforts come to light.   Super cool first venture into all this 3D printing world.  

 

Again awesome efforts going on here and I look forward to your progression moving forward.  Thanks for the courage and sharing this first hand with us mortals.   

 

Kikka dude!    Let do it!

 

Troy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2019 at 9:36 PM, MikeMaben said:

Boxart ...

 

ckoNsSc.jpg

 

:speak_cool:

 

THAT is a Japanese subject that I would actually build! You're such a tease with this post. . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Troy,

Kikka is very high on my want list, but not in the group of 3 that we’re going to focus on first. I have the 1/48 kit and a 1/32 Ne20 jet engine from zoukei mura at home to use for that project :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Archer Fine Transfers said:

 

In a way, yes.

 

However, in my experience, being proficient at AI could save having to learn the shape drawing part of a 3D application. For instance, let's say you're going to make a bulkhead. If you're proficient in AI you can draw the shape along with any lightening holes, etc. in AI quickly, import it into the 3D/CAD program and extrude it to the thickness required avoiding how to learn the 3D/CAD program's drawing tools. I know that's a gross simplification, but presented here as one example. 

Most CAD programs have far more sophisticated drafting tools than Illustrator, much more suited to engineering work. Stick in the CAD program. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, wunwinglow said:

It isn't that bad!!!! You are still using a computer, keyboard and mouse!! No need to get a fire and a big blanket!!! 

 

What's a mouse?  I haven't used one in 20 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...