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Kahunaminor

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  1. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Fw190D-13 Yellow 10   
    Thanks guys!  Not the usual approach, especially having purchased both conversion sets.  At least I'll be able to utilize components from both sets.
     
    The wing insert panel has been dealt with.  Looks a mess now but it should be work out nicely under a coat of paint.

     
    Now I'm going to take a look at the Henri Daehne resin prop.  This one is almost identical to the Ta152H prop that I just used except the prop mount is geared toward the Hasegawa D-9 kit.  Surprisingly, there is a part missing... the backing washer that aligns the prop shaft from behind the radiator face is missing.  Luckily, I have a bunch of HD D-9 props so I fished the missing part from one of those.

     
    There is some removal of casting blocks to deal with but Mr. Daehne provides a fully detailed instruction sheets with exact dimensions which takes the guessing out of cleanup.


     
    The rounded blade tips are the distinguishing feature between the D-13 and the Ta152H.

     
    I double check the fit of the HD prop to the fuselage...


     
    Finally jumping over what's normally the first step of any build... the cockpit!  The Eagle Editions cockpit for the D-9 is molded in a light-colored resin.  This is not a plug-n-play set and will require some removals and shaving of the fuselage insides to make it fit.



     
    I have limited references on the D-13 cockpit and I'm not sure how accurate these references are.  But I went ahead and made some changes based on the photos found in Mr. Crandall's Dora Volume 2.
     
    The D-13 has a cannon firing through the spinner and the cannon breech supposedly intrudes into the cockpit between the rudder pedals.  I've never seen a photo of this breech but I think the center section of the instrument panel will hide it.  The Eagle Editions cockpit comes with a bomb-control panel that seems to sorta kinda of match the panel in the photo.

     
    The starboard console looks very similar to the console in the Ta152H.  Coincidentally, I have the kit pieces for both consoles from the Ta152H build since I used the RB Productions photo etch replacements.  It's a pretty easy grafting job to put the Ta152H panel onto the D-9 cockpit.


     
    The port console is close enough to keep as is.

     
    Now that the D-13 changes to the cockpit have been mapped out, I'll have to start cutting up the kit fuselage to make it all fit.
  2. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Zoukei-Mura Ta152H-0 White 7   
    Thanks guys!  Thank you Kais for posting that excellent tutorial on the modifications you performed on your Ta152H build.  I hope it helps others avoid the fit issues that I ran into.  Let us know how it works out!
     
    I know it's a lot of work to absorb in such a short time but strike when the fire is hot, right?  With the major markings being painted, the amount of decals to applied is lessened.  Mostly stencils from the Eagle Cals decal sheet.
     







     
    She's all shiny... nice and purdy but we'll start throwing some dirt on her soon!
  3. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Moving forward slowly on the G-14.  I'm waiting for a few aftermarket sets to arrive so I can't push too far forward.  Which is actually a good thing because it forces me to slow down and really pay attention to what is front of me.  I've decided to attach the major external components to the fuselage at this stage as it will be easier to ensure clean joints without the wings in the way.  I've painted the little supercharger fan even though I know it probably won't be seen.

     
    The supercharger is glued into place. Since the riveting has been done, I've added the little scoops to the nose. These are in line with the scoops to the rear, not offset, which was the reason for the modification.


     
    The starboard gun "beule" was glued into place.  I actually glued both of them in and then realized that I still needed to sand the supercharger seam so I had to pop the port beule off before the glue dried.  I've also added an additional line of rivets below the gun insert per Vincent's comment but it hasn't been highlighted with the dark wash.

     
    Once the seam work on the supercharger was done, I was able to re-attach the port beule.

     
    The fuselage is in good shape.  I've used the preliminary wash to identify areas where I needed to redo the rivets and panel lines.





     
  4. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Martinnfb in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    In an attempt to break the deadlock on my bench I have started what in theory is a straight forward build, with a little twist. Eduard’s Hellcats are lauded as relatively simple to build with a good result. I intended to build with minimal AM, Ultracast prop and seat, to just have something on the go as everything else on the bench just doesn’t interest me and I wanted to do something quick and not Axis themed to redress the disparity ratios in the display cabinet:
     

     


     

     
    I started in the cockpit area and assembled and dry fit the main components. The kit seat back and base was reduced so the Ultracast seat fits a little better:
     

     

     

     

     
    I then turned my attention to the engine and the front and rear cylinder banks were joined. The Ultracast prop has an integral shaft, so the front of the kit shaft was removed. It will be drilled out at a later date. This allowed the magnetos to sit properly in the crankcase. Small holes were made in the cylinders to accept the PE wiring harness at a later date:


     



     
    So there it stood, almost but not quite. It was looking too simple so I added the wing fold kit from Wolfpack just to add some spice. A beautiful set that replaces the entire wings sections with resin:
     

     
    Keep tuned and thanks for looking!
     
  5. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Vincent in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Hi
     
    The gunsight touches the armored windshield because you placed the gunsight too much forward in its mount. You see the little thingie from the mount that sticks outside of the rear of gunsight ? It is the gunsight electrical connector and it should be under the gunsight, not behind it.
     
    So you need the place the gunsight much more
     
    A bit blurry picture of mine but it shows how far behind the gunsight should be :
     

     
    And a picture of the real plane showing pretty well how the electrical connector relates to the gunsight position :
     

  6. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Thanks guys!  I like the resin panel myself.  I need to tidy up that ammo counter though.
     
    Based on Vincent's excellent comments on the drop tank,  I've cut the pressure port tube from front and added a hex drain plug, in addition to filling in the forward-most panel line.  Also added some dents to the tank.  The hex plug is probably a little overscale but it was all I could find (hub from a Revell G-10 wheel).  I'll try to find a smaller version somewhere.


     
    The majority of today was spent fashioning seat harnesses.  I've decided to use the buckle hardware from the MDC brass fret and cut the fabric harness material from foil material.  Not sure where I got it... some random bottle of wine.  Hard to see but I've added some stitching using a neat toothed tool on the corner of a RB Productions brass fret.  Do I paint now and mount later or mount the belts on the seat and paint later?

  7. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Thanks for the input guys!
     
    Doing some more fiddling with the MDC cockpit set, trying to get the three major pieces (two sidewalls and cockpit tub) to fit in the fuselage.  The more I play with it, the more I am leaning towards having the three major pieces glued together and then attaching the whole cockpit assembly into the fuselage from the bottom.  This will reduce the amount of fit/placement variables and make things simpler for me.  To that end, I've removed portions of the yellow fuel line and re-positioned it (using lead wire) so that the rear edge of the sidewall can be pushed closer towards the seat.

     
    The top edge of this sidewall was repaired with black CA glue.

     
    This is how the three major components are fitting together.  All of the joints are not perfectly square but this should be fine in terms of the view from outside looking in.


     
    And this is how the MDC cockpit is fitting into the fuselage.


     
    You can see how moving that fuel line created a better fit between the sidewall and the seat.

     
    Now I can start thinking about painting the cockpit and which parts I want glued together and which parts I'll keep separate.
    Moving on to some other details... the MDC tail wheel comes in three parts with no positive connection between the parts.  

     
    I beefed up the connections by drilling holes and using a piece of brass tubing to create a pin connection.  I've also created an axle for the wheel.


     
    I've dressed up the drop tank and ETC rack.  Lightening holes in the rack were drilled out and the rack was thinned from the inside.  Connection points were drilled out to accept brass tubing, which will provide a more positive connection between the tank and rack.  The strap and fuel connection lines were re-done in brass.




     
    Finally, the ejection chutes openings were hollowed out to accept the MDC ammo chutes.


  8. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Martinnfb in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Great work John,
    Nice finds on the AM front, Master barrels are great and the ejection chutes are a pleasant surprise!
     
    Regards,
     
    Kent
  9. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Great work John,
    Nice finds on the AM front, Master barrels are great and the ejection chutes are a pleasant surprise!
     
    Regards,
     
    Kent
  10. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G-14 Hartmann Double Chevron   
    Thanks for the comments everyone!  Excellent suggestion Mark!  I'll try that next time as I do have some of that blue Micromask stuff on hand.  For this stage, I used Blu-Tack but I noticed that it did not stick very well to the shiny side of the cast resin.
     
     
     
    Great game plan!  I'll be doing something similar but probably without the use of masks.  I'll probably play around with a paint mule to see what kind of wear effects I can utilize.
     
     
     
    Another great tip for temporary attachment of resin parts!  Thank you!  Makes sense that the Germans would use temp white paint that would allow them to revert to normal camo colors once winter was over.
     
    Further futzing with the MDC resin cockpit.  I just noticed something during dry-fitting.  A notch in the kit fuselage that seems to correspond exactly with a tab on the resin cockpit.  It's not mentioned in the instructions but could it be a designed locating aid?  One way to find out.

     
    A couple of snips and cuts and it appears that this is something that MDC planned although not specifically documented.  It's hard to keep the resin tub in place without glue but it seems to butt up nicely once that notch was cut away.

     
    With the luxury of some extra sidewalls, I've cut away a rib on the bottom edge of the sidewalls to see if it would improve fit.  This would press the sidewalls closer to the fuselage walls and make the opening from the bottom wider, hopefully making it easier to fit the cockpit tub into position from the bottom.

     
    I temporarily secured the sidewalls using bits of Blu-Tack and then pushed the cockpit tub into place from the bottom opening.  Success... at least partially.  Not the cleanest fit but I was able to squeeze both sidewalls with the cockpit tub AND was able to tape the two fuselage sides together.  Some more trimming is required but I think I'm getting there.


     
    The delicate resin experienced the first breakage... the small pin to hold the trim wheels on the port side of the seat broke away.  I recovered the tiny piece and may attempt to reattach it at a later stage.

     
    Some clean up work on the fuselage was performed.  Don't need those little bumps on port side (they hold the umbrella on 109's based in the desert) and too many fuel fillers on the starboard side.


    The bumps are cut away and the fuel ports filled with Black CA glue.


  11. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Thunnus in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    Bravo John, 
    Stunning attention to detail and exemplary work.
     
    Regards,
  12. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    Thanks guys!  Especially the additional info on Horst Carganico's Mickey Mouse markings!
     
    Work continues on the G-6.  The exhausts have been painted.  Alclad Steel sprayed straight onto the resin as a base.  Tinted with Alclad Exhaust Manifold, drybrushed with some rusty reddish brown color and then the tips were sprayed black.


     
    After the starboard side decals were completed, I sprayed the model with a light coat of Alclad Aqua Gloss.

     
    I use a custom-mixed, water-based pastel wash.  All of the past riveting, filling and re-scribing comes to the surface.





     
    After the applied wash is dry, the model is wiped clean with a damp paper towel.  It's funny that its called a wash when you are actually dirtying up things.


     
    I'm going to let this sit for a day.  Before the wash is sealed with a clear coat, it's good to step away and then come back to make sure you clean off all of the wash.  Some inadvertent stains are good, others will detract so I'll take a look with fresh eyes tomorrow.



     
    I love the look of the AMUR Reaver G-6/AS cowling.  It has those bulged muscular proportions that made the DB605 aircraft so cool.

  13. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    Primer coat...the great revealer! Shows the great detail on the resin parts and some do overs on the assembly front. Good news on the fuselage to wing joins, not so much on the front windscreen, spine and belly. Some obvious (to me) flat spots on the underside. The spine needs addressing at each lap joint and the very fine seam to be reinstated on both top and bottom as per my references. Some PPP for the windscreen and rear windows (although that might not happen as the sliding section should effectively hide those) and a small blemish just forward of the windscreen. Good point is the forward fuselage is nice and smooth:


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Regards,
  14. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    F6F-3 progress. The inner wing assemblies have been permanently attached with two part epoxy.  Perfect plastic putty on the wing root seams and a couple of other small blemishes.  The white and black dots on the spine are 1mm punched discs to replace the light mounts which I sanded off. I have fashioned a sprue holding device for primer and painting by drilling through the engine hub. This will be cut off flush when the engine is mounted. Next step is priming with AK Grey primer and micro filler:
     

     

     

     

     

     
    Regards,
  15. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    Primer coat...the great revealer! Shows the great detail on the resin parts and some do overs on the assembly front. Good news on the fuselage to wing joins, not so much on the front windscreen, spine and belly. Some obvious (to me) flat spots on the underside. The spine needs addressing at each lap joint and the very fine seam to be reinstated on both top and bottom as per my references. Some PPP for the windscreen and rear windows (although that might not happen as the sliding section should effectively hide those) and a small blemish just forward of the windscreen. Good point is the forward fuselage is nice and smooth:


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Regards,
  16. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    Welcome back,
     
    Working on the cockpit. Gunsight glass added and canopies masked inside and out. The kit doesn’t have a mirror so I found some PE mirrors and used my Molotow pen for the first time. The wiring harness is now in place:


     

     

     

     

     
    The fuselage is joined and ready for cleanup. I have affixed the front windscreen with its rear view mirror. The windscreen piece was a tad wide at the rear edges so I removed some material from the inside and blended it in. My plan now is to seal the cockpit with tape to keep the dust etcetera out. The engine wiring has been completed and another wash of AK Neutral Grey applied. It will get a Matt finish later on. Test fitting it and the cowling show a fairly good fit and look. The engine will go aside now until final construction. The cowling will also be left unfixed so I can paint the scheme in full remove it and add the exhausts prior to fixing it for good:


     

     

     

     

     
    The cockpit has now been sealed with tape masks and masking liquid. I used the extra canopy pieces to trace the shapes fore and aft and got a fair shaped mask. Then fit and sealed. The resin inner wing sections are both free from their casting blocks. I then fitted the kit MLG components to the wing inners. The wings are dry fit into place:
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Thanks for looking,
     
    Regards,
  17. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Alain Gadbois in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    So progress marches slowly forward. In the cockpit, I have assembled and painted the main components. Making room for the Ultracast seat in the cockpit tub meant removing some plastic from the kit seat attachments.This is the original 2009 issue of this kit and does not include any decals or PE for the side consoles so they were drawn by hand with a Uni ink pen:


     

     
    The Ultracast seat was painted up and detailed with acrylics:
     

     
    The IP had its PE attached:
     


    The engine has been assembled and painted and awaits final assembly:
     

     

     
    The port resin wing inner has been cut from its casting block and test fitted. I also test fit the MLG components into their positions. A bit rough at the moment but I am encouraged by the fit so far:
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    The tail wheel had a hole cut out to better reflect reality and the tail wheel assembly trimmed so it could be fit after joining the fuselage:
     

     



     
    Finally, the fuselage to cowling was sanded to allow a better fit as it kept popping the seams on the cowling assembly. The cowling also had a styrene rod attached to strengthen the seam:
     

     

     

     
    The whole lot has been gloss coated in preparation for the decals, Airscale sets for the cockpit to busy it up then some washes:
     

     
    Regards, 
     
     
  18. Thanks
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Pete Fleischmann in HH-60G Pavehawk Kitty Hawk 1/35   
    Mindblowingly great stuff. Other words fail me.
     
    Regards,
  19. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Uncarina in F-117A • Nighthawk   
    May I suggest you use “Future” to secure the mesh screens to the acrylic?  It dries clear, gives you some working time to adjust the PE without marring the acrylic and has sufficient cohesive force when dry to hold the PE mesh in place. You can either fix the acrylic in place, mask the area during painting and add the painted screens after or you mask the intakes, paint the airframe and can add the screen/acrylic combination after painting if you like.
     
    Regards,
  20. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    Gloss coat applied (Alclad Aqua Gloss)...

     
    Port side decals about 75% done...

  21. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from Martinnfb in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    “The question is... do I still want to do the all-RLM76 scheme?”
     
    1 vote for yes, please.
     
    Regards,
  22. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to Thunnus in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    Work continues on the G-6/AS.  The bisected inner flaps were painted using mottled black as a preshading base.  This represents the process that will be used on the overall aircraft.



     
    The DF loop antenna base was re-shaped using Milliput.  The loop itself was cut off and replaced with a strip of aluminum from a soda can.

     
    The landing gear legs were painted.  A brake line made of lead wire was added.

     
    The prop blades were painted RLM70 Black Green over a Tamiya AS-12 Silver base and slightly chipped using hairspray.  The blades were then given a couple of salt fading passes.

     
    The prop blades were attached to the spinner with the help of the mounting jig that Barracuda sells separately.  This ensures that the blade position and pitch are uniformly correct.


     
    A test fit of the finished prop onto the unpainted fuselage...


  23. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from LSP_Kevin in 1/48 Eduard F6F-3 Hellcat Lt Vraciu, February 1944.   
    Welcome back,
     
    Working on the cockpit. Gunsight glass added and canopies masked inside and out. The kit doesn’t have a mirror so I found some PE mirrors and used my Molotow pen for the first time. The wiring harness is now in place:


     

     

     

     

     
    The fuselage is joined and ready for cleanup. I have affixed the front windscreen with its rear view mirror. The windscreen piece was a tad wide at the rear edges so I removed some material from the inside and blended it in. My plan now is to seal the cockpit with tape to keep the dust etcetera out. The engine wiring has been completed and another wash of AK Neutral Grey applied. It will get a Matt finish later on. Test fitting it and the cowling show a fairly good fit and look. The engine will go aside now until final construction. The cowling will also be left unfixed so I can paint the scheme in full remove it and add the exhausts prior to fixing it for good:


     

     

     

     

     
    The cockpit has now been sealed with tape masks and masking liquid. I used the extra canopy pieces to trace the shapes fore and aft and got a fair shaped mask. Then fit and sealed. The resin inner wing sections are both free from their casting blocks. I then fitted the kit MLG components to the wing inners. The wings are dry fit into place:
     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Thanks for looking,
     
    Regards,
  24. Like
    Kahunaminor got a reaction from monthebiff in 1/32 Revell Bf109G-6/AS Hohenjager   
    “The question is... do I still want to do the all-RLM76 scheme?”
     
    1 vote for yes, please.
     
    Regards,
  25. Like
    Kahunaminor reacted to F`s are my favs in F-117A • Nighthawk   
    10x Kahuna, the Future or the substitute that I have (Revell Contacta Clear and a couple of gloss acryllic lacquers) could very easily make a mess. The goal is to keep the mesh screen as "pristine" as possible because the transaprent acryic pieces underneath offer a very nice shine through the holes. It would be more than enough to secure the PE screens only along the edges and from the wider middle strut. The thing is that I'm really concerned about the outcome but if anything goes wrong - the original plastic parts will be used of course  which mesh patterns are also quite good indeed. So, here are the painted PE screens and one sitting flush over the acrylic part with the nice shines at a certain angle:
     

     

     
    The intake trunks and the engine faces are also painted. I was also curious about the color... believe me, I checked all my reff. pics and a couple of magazines, and I can't find a picture of the intakes. I was very curious of whether they are painted black because of stealth, some bare metallic finish or white gloss because it's typical for the US jets. Nevertheless, there are many pics that show a distant view at the engine faces through the relief doors, and they can't be seen because everything is black... without a doubt this could be achieved with flat black on the intakes. And perhaps the intake faces could only be partially/barely seen if lit with a torch through the doors for example. So that's why I painted the itnakes black. The  compressor parts of the engines will of course be covered from the inner sides.
     

     

     

     

     
     
     
     
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