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Bruce_Crosby

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Bruce_Crosby last won the day on September 14

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About Bruce_Crosby

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 10/04/1950

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Swindon, UK
  • Interests
    Late WWII fighters, big engines, big props. Modelling, playing with airbrushes, more modelling.

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  1. Hi Richard, I blew up the photo and it’s definitely two parts going back into the bag. And as you said, it’s whipped in two places, just as it meets the shackle and and about half way back to the bag. I’ll use ultra thin lead wire for that. Yes, the two cables attached to the shackle are just that, metal cables. They run out to anchor points on the ends of the axles, but looped in the run so that they will angle back at about 60 degrees to the centre line when deployed. They are tied up to all the support legs and the back of the axle with either thin metal wire or nylon breaking cable, probably about 25 kg breaking strain as the wire cable needs to be quite hefty to stop the trolley which is going to be travelling at well over 100mph when the chute opens. Edit: the shackle is a 912 pattern (914 is the round type) but I’m not sure of the size, probably F or G. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  2. Hi Richard, Your guess is as good as mine as there's only the picture on that posting and I think it's nylon or similar. Hence the term Lanyard, meaning its not wire or cable. Plus who puts wire cable on a parachute? It's not spliced, there are definitely two bits of lanyard there. Might just be looped round for a sliding fit, or might be whipped. It's not cemented in place yet, so if anyone's got a better picture of a similar assembly? Regards, Bruce Crosby
  3. Hi Guys, A little more work on the Mistel braking chute. I made the springs from fine brass wire. The lanyard to the shackle is made from twisted lead wire and the shackle itself is from a Takom 1/35 Panther tank kit. Springs made from brass wire wound round plastic rod to get the shape. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Springs superglued to the casing: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Twisted lead wire for the lanyard: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr With the shackle in place: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr That's all folks! Regards, Bruce Crosby
  4. Hi Guys, After a few days in the doldrums, I'm back on the Mistel. This time I'm making the braking parachute for the launch trolley. It's based on the photo of the chute on the much smaller trolley for the Ar-234A series but as this trolley is about twice the weight, I've increased the size somewhat. The photo I'm working from: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr How its should turn out, assuming all goes well. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr A start on the box, one of Tim Perry's 3D printed bits with a cover plate from sheet plastic, the start of the bulge shape from Tamiya white epoxy putty and the two large side opening flaps from Green Stuff epoxy putty which is much better to work for detail. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then I added the small green triangles top and bottom at the centre join as these will be where the top and bottom straps locate. It will make sense in a while! Plus some brackets and rivets. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Rear Mounts added, odd bits drilled. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr The top straps added. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr As it stands right now. I still have to make four coil springs, two each side. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr I hope this all makes sense! Regards, Bruce Crosby
  5. And more ramblings from a deranged mind! Canopy masked and painted. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Clear bits in place as well as the home made Pitot. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr My friend Klaus Herold noticed the wing alignment wasn't too hot so I removed a spacer from the top of the front strut to drop the nose of the He-162. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then it was back to sorting out the booster mountings Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr So I ended up making tiny brackets. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Front bracket in place. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Front mounts for the centre booster pair. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And the full set. Note the outer mountings are slightly farther forwards, this will angle the outer boosters a little. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And that's it so far! Regards, Bruce Crosby
  6. The Trumpeter Rato units under the Revell Me-262 Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr That's all, Folks!
  7. Hi Guys, Some more Mistel. Finally got the slats cemented in place! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then today I made the Pitot Tubes for both airframes. Albion Alloys Brass Tubing, lovely stuff! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And sharpened up the D/F loop with a half round file. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr I have some QuickBoost resin and Masters brass barrels but in the end I cleaned up the kit guns. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr The kit guns painted with a mix of MMP Dural and Black. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr The Pitots. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Dural loop with the Bakelite base in Rust. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Two really dirty boosters stolen from the Trumpeter kit. All grunge over RLM02. The originals might have been a dark metal, still grungy though!. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And that's today. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  8. A few photos of the He-162 after the Flory Wash. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Regards, Bruce Crosby
  9. Here we go again, this is part, well, I don't know! I spent the day adding some small chips with a sponge and brush then went for it big time with Flory Washes. I used two colours, Grime and Dark Dirt, very reminiscent of the muck I saw on aircraft from when I was in the RAF. Most service points on the Me-262 and the usual way into the cockpit are on the port side, so it's the port engine that gets most of the footfall. Plus it's got bits from all over, like a front cover in RLM02 and the port clam shell door is a different shade of blue. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Starboard engine is original so has some chipped paintwork on the intake. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr I got a fuel triangle decal in the wrong place and as it was already varnished over I had to remove it with a scalpel then sand the area. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And a new one. Lucky I've got another Revell Me- 262 to hand! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Chips with everything! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr With the Flory Wash: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr That's all Folks! Regards, Bruce Crosby
  10. A minor showing at Wiltshire Scale Modellers last night. The launch dolly so fay. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Hmmmm. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Hmmmm. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Time Maunder is the good looking one standing up. A superb artist, does things like Box Art for various manufacturers. I'm the ugly old bugger sitting down. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Painting the wheels: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And the rear bogies Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Bogies assembled temporarily Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Regards, Bruce Crosby
  11. Hi Guys, More Mistel! Here's the port engine in its new colours: lots of masking but worth it. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Masking up to paint the areas under the slats. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr With some White Aluminium plus Chrome from MMP. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr The original holes to locate the struts: I had scaled them from the Dragon 1/48 model but like all things. it hadn't been researched properly and the points are in the middle of panels, not load bearing frames or spars. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And it just jarred on my nerves. So I re-drilled the holes, the front one just behind the cockpit rear bulkhead frame, the other two on the main frame just ahead of the undercarriage doors. The gear legs hang from this frame and the wings are bolted on top, so this is exactly the right place! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr The original line up: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr New line up: see how the code numbers are no longer aligned. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr As it was: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And now. Note I've outlined the Yellow 3 with a black marker pen, only roughly as if hand painted by a 16 year old conscript. (My mental age!) Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Hope you like it so far. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  12. Back with today's work on the Mistel. First up this morning was to get masks and paint onto the He-162. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Some RLM04 yellow; Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then Back and White to get this: Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then this afternoon, after some talking with Klaus Herold, I mixed up some RLM02 and went over the plated over cockpit, oversprayed onto the cammo, not clean lines. This was after all, a last flight! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Here with the support struts for the He-162 and the access panel on the port Jumo in RLM02 as well. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And that's today's work over. May not look much but lots of masking and mixing, cleaning up, etc. I used the Gunze PS-770 a lot today, it produces a very tight spray pattern, great for close-in work. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  13. Today I spent a while changing some stuff on the mask design for the He-162 and the Me-262 in AutoCAD, then cut a new sheet on the Silhouette. here it is in the Silhouette program ready to cut. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Placing the masks. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Obviously it all went wrong and this is the second attempt on the starboard upper wing. Lots of repainting required, plus a lot of swearing and cursing. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr But eventually it started to look better. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then onto the underwing crosses in black and the stencil type swastikas on the rudder. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Tomorrow I'll be putting the stencils on the He-162. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  14. Hi Guys, A busy day at the spray booth, trying to sort out the lifted paint on the Me-262 Flying Bomb part of the Mistel. Here's the damage on one side, about the same on the other side. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr I masked up the fuselage already painted, laying up with Aizu Micron Masking Tape back filled with odds and ends from yesterday's session, then applied a mix of MMP's Grey Primer in thin layers, building it up with the judicious use of a hair dryer to harden each layer. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr After some minor sanding and smoothing with Micro Mesh pads I applied the base colour of RLM76 again, smooth as a baby's posterior. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then on with a scribble and mottle of MMP RLM 82, lightened with a touch of White. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Then a few squirts of RLM66 over the blue and green. Yes, it's not a "real" external colour but as this is a fictitious item that never flew and the war stopped in 1945 not 1946, I can more or less dictate my own conditions! Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr And the result of a few hours work. Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Untitled by Bruce Crosby, on Flickr Tomorrow I hope to mask and paint some panels on the port engine, specifically the rear end will be black, the intake ring might be bare metal and the panel behind it might get the same cammo as the nose. Then again, it might not. Could be Primer or plain old aluminium. Plus the markings might get cut on the Silhouette and sprayed, depends how the day goes. Hope somebody likes it. Regards, Bruce Crosby
  15. No, its standard Polystyrene, cleaned carefully. Primer has been on for a week, paint for a couple of days. The main fuselage was painted blue a few days ago but the greem and brown both went on today, masking a few minutes after spraying, normal tape and no lifting at all.
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