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Yet another Mig-25RBF


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I have been messing about with using paper and card for some simple model making which has me spending some time reading through a few of many online forums catering to paper and card modelling. Many of these makers have honed their skills in this medium to very high degree and produce some amazing work. 

 

This particular thread caught my eye this morning:

 

https://www.kartonbau.de/forum/thema/42034-baubericht-mig-25-rbf-angraf-1-33/

 

Makes my efforts using paper and card seem very wanting but I am getting better and some of the techniques do work very well for scratch building and detailing in plastic. There is always something new and interesting to learn, practice, and refine. 

 

cheers, Graham 

 

 

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1 hour ago, 32scalelover said:

Why would they make it 1/33 scale??  Does look very nice .  Amazing what they can do with paper.

 

Greg

Hey, I actually heard the answer to this!  Years ago I was told by NASM volunteer Anne that paper models became popular in post-war eastern Europe because their industry was still recovering from WWII devastation, and plastic molding machines weren't being used for making toys.  1:100 was a common aircraft drawing scale, so scaling the drawings up to three times their original size ends up at 1:33 scale.  So, over time, 1:33rd scale became the "standard" paper model scale.

 

I have a Fw-200 Condor paper model in my "not-to-likely-to-ever-be-built" pile in my stash.  I also have a Val and a Kate, also "not-to-likely-to-ever-be-built".  I remember someone here on the LSP site did a very nice Kate.

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Paper card models of railroad trains are in 1/25 scale, by the way.

I am too ham fisted to work with fragile card materials. I would prefer to xerox copy the paper models to 1/32 or to 1/24 scale, then rubber cement them onto styrene sheets and then assemble them. But first remove the color copy off the plastic. Assemble the plastic model and then paint it. I have been planning to do this again but I never got around to it. Still wont but the idea is good.

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1 hour ago, pennausamike said:

1:100 was a common aircraft drawing scale, so scaling the drawings up to three times their original size ends up at 1:33 scale.  So, over time, 1:33rd scale became the "standard" paper model scale.

 

I had head something similar. Other common paper model scales include 1/50 and 1/100  plus you also find 1/48 and 1/72. It's easy to print to whatever scale you want ;)

 

The history of the mish mash of models scales is an interesting topic. For a probably not completely accurate listing:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_scale_model_sizes

 

cheers, Graham

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, GrahamC said:

 

I had head something similar. Other common paper model scales include 1/50 and 1/100  plus you also find 1/48 and 1/72. It's easy to print to whatever scale you want ;)

 

The history of the mish mash of models scales is an interesting topic. For a probably not completely accurate listing:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_scale_model_sizes

 

cheers, Graham

 

 

 

 

I'm guessing that in the days before modern copiers, it wasn't so easy to re-scale a drawing; had to be done manually, I imagine.  So re-drawing something three times bigger was an easier conversion.

 

Also, I found the pic from the display table at the Northern Virginia model show that Anne was at.  (I had originally met her at the Silver Hill restoration shop.) 

 

card%20010_zpsapxybwdi.jpg

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