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Master Box RAF Pilots


Guest Jessie_C

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Guest Jessie_C

These are supposed to be "WW II era" but their equipment dates them to around 1940. Still, they're excellent figures with good sculpting and natural poses. I've named them (in order of apperance) Ginger, Johnny, Bob and Rusty.

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Guest Jessie_C

Okay, I'm not allowed to post so many pictures so Bob and Rusty get to follow in this post
 
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Plus a group shot. Got a Spitfire I around? This lot will help make it look excellent.
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Edited by Jessie_C
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Guest Jessie_C

Want to crib off mine? Yes, I think that their helmets, oxygen masks, Mae Wests and flying boots were current issue into 1941. They're definitely not any earlier than late 1939/1940 though, and not too much later. The stiff canvas masks were replaced by rubber ones pretty quickly given how many pilots were lost to hypoxia after their hoses froze up on long raids into hostile territory.

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The parachute pack is interesting.  Different from the American clip on chutes.  As far as I know, it was only bombers which had a seperate pack, clipped normally onto the chest, the fighter or pilots chute you sat on, was permanently mounted to the harness, so would hang down on your bum.  It was impossible to walk upright wearing it, virtually impossible to walk. These exact same parachutes were still used years after the war, by the South African Air Force, when the Harvards (SNJ/T6G) aircraft were still used for flying training.  The Harvards all had the original metal bucket seats, as you sat ontop of the chutes.  (Hence why I know you can hardly walk wearing them!) so not too sure about the one figure just wearing the harness?

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Guest Jessie_C

Could be the good folk at Master Box got their parachute types mixed up? It wouldn't be terribly difficult to glue the parachute pack to the harness but then it would likely want to fall off, pulling all of his straps up over his shoulders to choke him as he stands there. Maybe that's why he's waving his arms about?

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The parachute pack is interesting.  Different from the American clip on chutes.  As far as I know, it was only bombers which had a seperate pack, clipped normally onto the chest, the fighter or pilots chute you sat on, was permanently mounted to the harness, so would hang down on your bum.  It was impossible to walk upright wearing it, virtually impossible to walk. These exact same parachutes were still used years after the war, by the South African Air Force, when the Harvards (SNJ/T6G) aircraft were still used for flying training.  The Harvards all had the original metal bucket seats, as you sat ontop of the chutes.  (Hence why I know you can hardly walk wearing them!) so not too sure about the one figure just wearing the harness?

 

Pretty sure they were much the same as the Irvin ones we wore when Chipmunk flying - and, yes - if you could stand upright then the harness was too loose!  :)

 

My first ever aeroplane flight aged 14 (Chipmunk WP896 from RAF Woodvale) I 'waggled' out to the aeroplane with a mixture of nerves and excitement.

 

Clambered up onto the wingroot to be tapped on the shoulder by one of the ground crew. He pointed down at the parachute and there was some silk hanging out! Was walked back to the crew room where the guys used the handle of an old paint brush to stuff the silk back in - with the comment - it'll be fine son - but don't worry - bring it back if it doesn't work and we'll give you another!' :)

 

Iain

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Ha Ha Lain, yes I remember you could sight the silk if you lifted a corner of the khaki pack.  They told us in pre flights, check the small metal rods on the rip chord cable end were not bent, as if they were, you will not be able to pull it.  These sat under that small flap in the centre of the pack with the "lift the dots" fasteners.  This was what you sat on, these little rods ended up with your full weight on them against the metal seat...I always worried a bit about that!  But quite right, if you could stand in it,  the harness was too loose.  On the Harvards we would put them on the tailplane, drape the shoulder straps over your shoulders, plug them into the release box and then walk forward dragging the pack off the tail.  This would thump onto the back of your legs then you would do up the rest of the straps, into that big round black release"box".  The groin straps had a certain way of looping over and under around the central loop, can't recall how that worked any more!

 

The Airfix 1/72 RAF figures have one pilot figure correctly posed with the whole chute straps and back pack, draped over his shoulder.

Edited by Jimmyjet
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Yes Jessie, as I said, the one Airfix 1/72 RAF figures pilot, is holding a chute, pack and all,  draped over one shoulder.  This is correct with this type of chute.  But those are great figures you have there.  I think one of the Trumpeter LSP kits had some very good figures supplied with it?

Edited by Jimmyjet
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