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The Art of our hobby


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#16 Hardcore

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 07:37 PM

I use simple kits with no sub-assemblies so i can focus on learning the techniques only.
The meng toon kits are great for this.
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#17 mozart

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 08:09 PM

Model what you love, model what you know. When you do so, life will automatically be breathed into it, whether the subject matter is fresh off the assembly line or weathered like an old dog.
Max
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Max

www.ordinarycrew.co.uk

 

 


#18 LSP_Typhoonattack

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 09:08 PM

Many of us (perhaps most) have a similar issue;... how to breathe life into a project. I don't believe there is one easy solution, different methods seem to work different for different folks. For what I consider to be the best of the best, take a look at this Spitfire from Ralph. Ralph has a subtlety and finesse that seems to work really, really well, with great attention to detail, and approaches a level of "realism" that few seem able to attain, though many of us do try (in my case, unsuccessfully) to realize.


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Kevin

I was going to procrastinate tonight, but decided to wait.

 

In Progress:

 

 

 

 


#19 ssculptor

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 09:48 PM

All I know is that machinery design is basically an intellectual, rational approach to design whereas weathering is an art form and thus stems from one's subconscious mind. There is some overlap but basically they are from two different areas of the mind.  

When you do engineering work you are seeking logical, rational solutions to a problem.. But there are really no hard and fast rules in art. You make art from feelings, not from formulii and calculations. You are making art, not machinery.

It takes a different mindset. 

So I suggest that to get your mind working in the intuitive mode necessary for art that you take some inexpensive models and run a series of approaches for weathering them.  I would take a number of similar inexpensive models, paint one in uniform colors and then experiment with putting on a single light wash.  Then stand back and look at it after it dries. Read your articles you have accumulated and try different color washes in the appropriate areas, try adding different colors, etc. Experiment using what you are learning from the articles.  Remember that one learns from doing, not just from reading about it. Thus you will develop an eye for what you are weathering and you will be building up your skill set. It wont happen immediately but by this experimenting you will develop your approach to weathering. 

Since you will have some models to work with you will see right away what works and what doesn't. It will take some time but anything you are good at takes time.

Oh, do not forget, try to enjoy what you are doing while you are at it.

It will be a real trip. 

Bon voyage.

Stephen


Edited by ssculptor, 08 March 2018 - 09:50 PM.

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Nyah hah hah hah hah.

#20 ScottsGT

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 11:24 PM

One thing I discovered is colors aren't always what you think they should be. For example, black. Flat black to be precise. I usually paint dash panels or tires flat black, but then I dry brush with a dark gray to bring out the highlights. Sometimes even a lighter shade of gray. If left out of the jar, the sprayed color would be lifeless with no details.
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#21 BiggTim

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 11:37 PM

Many of us (perhaps most) have a similar issue;... how to breathe life into a project. I don't believe there is one easy solution, different methods seem to work different for different folks. For what I consider to be the best of the best, take a look at this Spitfire from Ralph. Ralph has a subtlety and finesse that seems to work really, really well, with great attention to detail, and approaches a level of "realism" that few seem able to attain, though many of us do try (in my case, unsuccessfully) to realize.

 

Yes, that Spitty from Ralph is a fantastic example indeed!


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In progress: 1/32 Trumpy P-38L (very slowly), and some others.....

Completed in 2017: Trumpeter Bf109E-4, 1/16 Waffen SS figure

Previous Completions: Hasegawa F6F-3 Hellcat, Hase Me-163 Jagerfaust , 1/16 Fokker DVII Scratchbuilt Wooden Skeleton

 


#22 TonyT

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 12:12 AM

It is and is a stunning example, you would also get it on the tailplane too as the wheels would throw it up.. A lot depends on the aircraft and even between variants, an example Spitfires leak and breath oil from the engine and you get a lot of staining in the underside from the cowling flowing aft, the MK 19 however because of the photo recce role runs the engine breathers down the wing route and In to the fuselage, these then vent the oil air mixture from behind the camera ports to prevent the Windows becoming contaminate with oil.

Another thing you note in real life you rarely see modelled is curvature of the staining, thankfully the exhaust staining of old has gone and people now curve it to follow what is the airflow over a wing, though people tend to miss staining on wings top and bottom surfaces also curves with the airflow.

Edited by TonyT, 09 March 2018 - 12:12 AM.

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#23 Bstarr3

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 02:53 AM

Gwana, it's funny you should bring this up in this way. I often feel that I'm in the opposite boat. I won't say I'm great at the artistic side, but weathering, mixing paint colors, formulating dioramas - the artistic elements of our hobby - I feel that I sort of have an eye for these things. The engineering stuff, on the other hand, is a total mystery. I will never understand the way that people like Wolf and Out2getcha do such amazing scratchbuilding. Making all sorts of parts out of strips, tubes, and sheets of styrene? I feel like I will never have an "eye" for that kind of thing. I will have to try to exactly duplicate somebody else's effort from a build thread.

We're all different, but we're all drawn to making tiny airplanes...
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#24 dodgem37

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 11:21 PM

Everyone here is a Master in their own right.  Some are more Masterful than others.  If you have an idea that you can't figure out how to execute, all you need do is explain your idea, ask for help, and many a Master will answer.

 

Sincerely,

Mark


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#25 Hardcore

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Posted 09 March 2018 - 11:37 PM

Dioramas. THAT is what bring models to life!
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#26 ringleheim

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 02:59 AM

Two thoughts:

 

You seem to be aware of weathering techniques, but feel you are not good at them. 

 

You need to practice on scraps and leftover pieces.  Practice makes perfect. 

 

Second, wander the internet until you find a photo of something that you think is weathered extremely well and is well shown in the photograph(s).

 

Then try to copy what you see exactly.  Repeat process.  Good luck!  


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#27 Squizzy

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 09:54 AM

I think Hardcore is right, dioramas. It doesn't need to be a great big huge thing, maybe a jet on a carrier deck with the flight crew, and a tractor, or weapons being loaded. But I also know that I'm my own worst critic, and I think that is because I spend so much time working on something, so I know all the little flaws that no one else can see. However, real aircraft have 'flaws', I think that the important thing is to enjoy the hobby, and learn your own way, because there are numerous ways to get the some results with different equipment or materials.
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#28 Out2gtcha

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 03:21 PM

Dioramas are indeed the way to really tell a story, and bring that story to life with models. I think for the most part though (myself included) the reason more of us dont do them is figures. We love our aircraft around here, and we have some of THE best aircraft modelers in any scale, but that does not necessarily preclude making good figures. I know personally, even with Sheps books and guidance from all over, Im still no Jerry R when it comes to figgies.  I know practice makes perfect, but I have not done a real dio in a long time..............Id love to do a water dio at some point! 

 

Now I can only speak for myself, but a well done diorama (Shep Paine was my GOD when I was younger, and I still have his second edition how to build dioramas, as I completely wore out the first copy I had) not only includes figures but  models that are weathered in a realistic fashion. Both figure painting and weathering are two things that if not done in a certain way can ruin a dio, and if not ruin it, will make it look toy like, and not realistic.  To me, realistic weathering and figure painting/making are two of the hardest things to accomplish in our hobby. 


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#29 Gerhard

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 04:04 PM

Dioramas. THAT is what bring models to life!

Yes, but where do you put them? I also find figure painting difficult, but I try and paint a decent seated pilot, at least. They usually turn out crap, but hey, my models I build are for me, not an exhibition. 


Edited by Gerhard, 13 March 2018 - 04:08 PM.

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#30 gwana

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Posted 13 March 2018 - 04:13 PM

In this scale, I'd need a LOT of coffee tables...


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Is this glue fingerprint in scale?





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