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Two Jeeps

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#1 Tomek

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 04:56 AM

As big matt would say, idle hands are the devil's workshop!
Time to start a new build.

For my next project I want to do something bit different than I've done so far. I want to expand a little my skills set by training making bases and humble dioramas. This project should be perfect for this. I'm still bouncing in my head different ideas, what exactly I would like to do, but I already know I want to create a scene with the Cub (L-4H ) and the Jeep standing somewhere in a field in Europe in 1944. I'm considering using some figures to bring some life to the scene. I haven't done much research yet, but I figure I have plenty of time before I'll need to make any decisions.

I'm going to use two kits: Piper L-4H published by Kartonowa Kolekcja in 1/33 and a rescaled properly Willys Jeep (the original is in 1/25) from Modelik. The Jeep most likely will be painted (another new experience for me!) and I'll try to show the details of that in the Non-LSP section at some point. The Cub in the kit depicts a machine with the number 43-29601 which served with the 30th Infrantry Division. I'm thinking about scratchbuilding few things in this build. I'm going to redo the cockpit, which will be entrirely painted and I'm considering doing the same with the engine. The engine details are quite visible through the gaps in the cowl - I think it will be worthy to put some extra effort there as well.


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The Cub kit has only four pages of parts, but I'm expecting some difficult moments with the greenhouse and the wing assembly. Photos of some assembly drawings and sheets with parts below:

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Before I started cutting anything I sealed the sheets with SIG nitrate dope. Previously I used for that purpose Model Master Flat Lacquer (it worked well), but recently I have experimented with this product and I really like it. Even one single coat on the print side makes the cardstock stiffer and easier to work with. Summer is coming and I need all the protection from my sweaty hands which can make a model fuzzy pretty quickly. The formers were laminated on 1mm cardboard with the contact cement. I use usually for that purpose 3M 77 spray adhesive, but here it seemed just overkill , there is only small area to be laminated.


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And the beginning of the fuselage. The tail section is not glued yet to the cockpit part. I need to think about my game plan first http://forum.largesc...O_DIR#/wink.png


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Thanks for lookin in!


Edited by Tomek, 29 October 2014 - 01:51 AM.

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#2 Daywalker

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 05:02 AM

I'm looking forward to watching you build this one! I have always wanted to model a paper version of the Hughes H-1, and am excited to watch a master work in this media. :popcorn:

#3 radial

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 11:32 AM

Very cool. You might remember the j-3 conversion I did from the Revell PA-18 kit. I can see many parts from that kit that would be useful to this build. Engine, wing struts, wheels and cabin parts to name a few. Also, it could be helpful to see Revell's assembly process specifically the wing to fuse join. I will watch with great interest!

#4 Tomek

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 01:48 PM

Frank, I'm far from mastering paper modeling skills, but I'll try my best to provide proper entertainment ;) . Thanks for the interest!

Also, it could be helpful to see Revell's assembly process specifically the wing to fuse join. I will watch with great interest!

I fell for your Cub instantly. Who doesn't like yellow???
You are probably right, some parts from the Revell kit would be helpful. I got some extra stuff for this build though. I'm waiting for a package with resin wheels made for this kit (1/33 scale), and I have something interesting for the dial faces of the instrument panel. More about these when I get to that stage of the build.

#5 MARU5137

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 07:56 AM

Tomek,


I am liking this already and this should be such a thrilling build to follow..Keep us posted with updates ... :thumbsup:

:punk:

Res Non Verba .

La calma è la virtù dei forti !

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#6 PhilB

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 04:08 PM

Here we go again!!!
More cool stuff!
:yahoo: :thumbsup:

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#7 LSP_Kevin

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 08:38 PM

Tomek, looking forward to more of your excellent work!

Kev

#8 Leif Ohlsson

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 04:47 PM

This is very good news. I envy you, Tomek, for concentrating on such a worthy project. I have this model, and I would also like to do something different with it - at some point. For now, I'll enjoy watching you.

Can I offer you a good-luck present, for your diorama?

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Edited by Leif Ohlsson, 25 May 2012 - 04:51 PM.

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#9 ssculptor

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 04:59 PM

Question. When making a compound curve in cardboard one usually uses a spoon-like tool, rubbing from the back to get the board to stretch into a saddle shape. Does the SIG Clear Nitrate dope degrade the ability of the cardboard to take a curve?
Thanks,
Stephen
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The Shadow knows!
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#10 Tomek

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 06:38 PM

Thanks for the interest guys! I'm still pretty much on the research stage, haven't done any more work yet. I'm trying this time to plan ahead as much as possible to avoid situations when I'm forced to do something because I haven't seen it coming early enough - I'm just trying to learn something from my previous build experience .

Pretty cool drawing, Leif! I guess I've learned something already, because I discovered some inaccuracies in the cockpit ;)
This drawing gave me some idea about the diorama :D .
I was thinking how to connect these two models. I just didn't want them to stand next to each other (not that there is anything wrong with that). How about a scene where fuel from the Jeep is drained to refill the Cub's tank? These guys landed almost everywhere, and when short on fuel they borrowed it from vehicles if needed. The Continental A-65 engine didn't have problems with that. More I think about it, more I like it. Thanks for the inspiration!
I envy your re-painting skills! This opens up so many options. I have some nice reference photos of less common painting jobs if you interested.

Stephen,
I haven't experience any problems with the nitrate dope in such aspects. I tend to moisten parts with thinned O'glue before start to form them, but this is not required. A bit more stiffness of the card may work actually to your advantage - the material is not that delicate anymore and can take more abuse. I know some modelers use ND quite heavily (many coats from both sides - until the cardstock becomes translucent when treated), and I haven’t heard them complaining that it was more difficult to form it. Hope this helps.
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#11 Iain (32SIG)

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 10:47 PM

Excellent!

Was flying a J3 the other weekend - and *may* end up getting a share in her. If you need detail pix let me know...

Please excuse the Cheshire cat grin - I rather liked her - slow, but full of character!

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Iain

Edited by 32SIG, 25 May 2012 - 10:47 PM.

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#12 miamiangler

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 12:14 PM

Hi Tomek,

Nice project .I`ll be watching this one . With the coating of the Nitrate dope ,can it be sprayed or is it best to use a brush ? Do you coat both sides . I`m still trying to learn as much as I can before I cut up paper.

Best Regards
Willi

#13 Tomek

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 06:48 PM

Hey Iain, thanks for the reference photos offer. I've gathered quite a bit of these, but I may need something specific. If I run into any blind spots I'll know where to go for answers. BTW, I think my grin would be much bigger if I had a chance to fly her! :P
Love the photos!

Willi, I've never heard about applying nitrate dope with an airbrush. I don't even think that would do any good. ND is absorbed by card, so working with brush is much more desirable. Use a soft wide brush, and work on 5x5” area at the time. Work with the brush until it stops “sliding” and you start to feel some resistance. Then move to adjacent area and repeat.
If you see that nitrate dope dries with streaks that means you need to thinned it properly.
Now, the number of coats depends on the adhesive you are going to be using. I’m using O’glue, which is designed for paper and won’t work well with completely sealed material, therefore only one coat. Different glue may allow you to use more coats, strengthening the sheets even more. Be careful though, and do some experiments first.

Edited by Tomek, 30 May 2012 - 06:51 PM.

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#14 Tomek

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:21 PM

Time to show some progress.
I mentioned earlier that my plan for this this build is to redo and paint the cockpit. I’ve never done such thing so it will be a big challenge - especially painting. I hope I can get some help when needed from you guys. Please expect some level of simplification of my work. I’m not up to super detailing level yet.

Thanks to my friend, Paweł Ogarek, I got quite few megabites of reference photos of the L-4H Cub at the aviation museum in Krakow, Poland. Thanks buddy!


I started with detailing the floor. I replaced kit rudder pedals with ones made of styrene rods and added the brake pedals.

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Next I scratchbuilt the control sticks, torque tube and scott brake units. I used paper and styrene rods for these. The control sticks are too thick it seems, and I need to redo them …

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Then time came for the the bell crank, located behind the observer's seat. The push-pull tube connecting it with the stick will be added later, when I figure out the right distance between these two. Below the best photos I have of these elements, I had to mostly rely on drawings to figure out how exactly they looked like. The first photo shows the bell crank protected by a cover and I’ll try to do that element as well. The second shot was taken under the rear seat.

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The floor looks like this now (only the pedals are glued into place)

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More to come....

Edited by Tomek, 20 June 2012 - 08:28 PM.

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#15 Tomek

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:24 PM

Military Cubs carried a fire extinguisher. I’m in the middle of painting it. It will be placed between pilots legs ahead of the front seat. Pilot’s manual shows it under the front seat, but the Cubs with installed SCR 609 radio, as most of the L-4H variants in 1944, had to move it to install the batteries there.

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In the end I made the seats out of cardboard and styrene rods. From what I gather, out-of-factory seats were covered with black leather. Not quite happy with them (buttons too big for example), but they will stay …. unless you guys strongly object ;-)

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Edited by Tomek, 09 July 2012 - 07:16 PM.

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