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F4U-1D Corsair Tamiya 1:32 "After years of hard work"


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I would like to present you the first of the three F4U-1D models.
A few words of introduction, I received an order from one of the cultural institutions to make a series of models that were to show the influence of time on the appearance of the aircraft.
So I will have to make a Corsair in a heavily worn-out version, the next one will have visible signs of use, and the last one will be as delivered from the factory.

 

First, a heavily exploited version.

 

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Interesting and eye catching

 

i am generally of the view that most models of WWII aircraft greatly underestimate just how filthy they got in service, but this just doesn’t look ‘right’ to me.

 

it looks like it was in a sandstorm - I like the look, but I’m not sure I have ever seen pictures of these late Corsairs looking like this. The ones I have in mind which were land based did get massively dirty, but in my mind the colour version looked different?

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14 hours ago, nmayhew said:

Interesting and eye catching

 

i am generally of the view that most models of WWII aircraft greatly underestimate just how filthy they got in service, but this just doesn’t look ‘right’ to me.

 

it looks like it was in a sandstorm - I like the look, but I’m not sure I have ever seen pictures of these late Corsairs looking like this. The ones I have in mind which were land based did get massively dirty, but in my mind the colour version looked different?

I think he's trying more to illustrate the extremes of aircraft weather vrs depicting an actual F4U (don't want to put words in the OP's mouth though).   The Corsair above was carrier based.   These aircraft were generally in very good condition.   If it looked like that, the deck crew would have promptly pushed it over the side! 

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2 hours ago, John1 said:

I think he's trying more to illustrate the extremes of aircraft weather vrs depicting an actual F4U (don't want to put words in the OP's mouth though).   The Corsair above was carrier based.   These aircraft were generally in very good condition.   If it looked like that, the deck crew would have promptly pushed it over the side! 

The ordering this model is the Aviation Museum. 
They wants to present at the exhibition models from the IIWW, Cold War and modern models from take-off to extreme wear, even if the plane has never looked like this.
Each period represents one model in three versions: New straight from the factory, worn with signs of use and the last EXTREMELY WORN
It's more about showing a visual show than a real, specific plane from a photo of a specific day.

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7 hours ago, Koralik said:

The ordering this model is the Aviation Museum. 
They wants to present at the exhibition models from the IIWW, Cold War and modern models from take-off to extreme wear, even if the plane has never looked like this.
Each period represents one model in three versions: New straight from the factory, worn with signs of use and the last EXTREMELY WORN
It's more about showing a visual show than a real, specific plane from a photo of a specific day.

I get your point, but if this was the intent it may have been better to just built it with generic markings - as it is (at least to me), I look at it and I see a very skilled modeler who put a lot of effort into creating a model that is completely wrong.  By choosing the markings you did, you placed the model in a specific environment at a specific period, and the finishing methods and end result are inappropriate for that environment and period.  Just my 2 cents.

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6 hours ago, Joe Hegedus said:

I get your point, but if this was the intent it may have been better to just built it with generic markings - as it is (at least to me), I look at it and I see a very skilled modeler who put a lot of effort into creating a model that is completely wrong.  By choosing the markings you did, you placed the model in a specific environment at a specific period, and the finishing methods and end result are inappropriate for that environment and period.  Just my 2 cents.

I have the impression that you do not understand an essential detail. I have no influence on the concept. I received an offer to make the model in accordance with the plan presented by the institution that ordered the models, and that's it.

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9 hours ago, Koralik said:

I have the impression that you do not understand an essential detail. I have no influence on the concept. I received an offer to make the model in accordance with the plan presented by the institution that ordered the models, and that's it.

I understand the concept.  I, however, think that if a museum is contracting for a model that shows a subject very heavily weathered, the subject should be of a prototype that actually looked like that, or if such a subject could not be documented, then generic markings would be more appropriate.  Building a subject that served on an aircraft carrier in the north pacific in winter, then weathering it such that it looks like it sat behind a hangar in the desert for 10 years is not appropriate for that purpose in my mind.  My thoughts are that a museum would want a model that accurately portrayed a subject.  

 

But, that is my opinion.  If your customer is happy with the result, then mission accomplished.  

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13 minutes ago, Joe Hegedus said:

I understand the concept.  I, however, think that if a museum is contracting for a model that shows a subject very heavily weathered, the subject should be of a prototype that actually looked like that, or if such a subject could not be documented, then generic markings would be more appropriate.  Building a subject that served on an aircraft carrier in the north pacific in winter, then weathering it such that it looks like it sat behind a hangar in the desert for 10 years is not appropriate for that purpose in my mind.  My thoughts are that a museum would want a model that accurately portrayed a subject.  

 

But, that is my opinion.  If your customer is happy with the result, then mission accomplished.  

Yes:D 

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