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1/32 Douglas TBD-1 Devastator by Trumpeter


Kagemusha
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9 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:

Wow.

just like the Coelacanth-

 

P

 

I recall that despite being thought extinct, once one was caught, some Japanese millionaire sought to catch more so he could eat them (for longer life)! Probably the only reason it's not extinct, is that humans didn't know it was there to begin with. How sad.

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4 hours ago, LSP_K2 said:

 

I recall that despite being thought extinct, once one was caught, some Japanese millionaire sought to catch more so he could eat them (for longer life)! Probably the only reason it's not extinct, is that humans didn't know it was there to begin with. How sad.


…for a sec there I thought perhaps no one on LSP would know what I was talking about.

I’m here for pithy comments and impish retorts.

 

Good show Kev-

P

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3 minutes ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


…for a sec there I thought perhaps no one on LSP would know what I was talking about.

I’m here for pithy comments and impish retorts.

 

Good show Kev-

P

 

The fact that my brother was quite a well known paleontologist probably helps some.

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2 hours ago, LSP_K2 said:
2 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


…for a sec there I thought perhaps no one on LSP would know what I was talking about.

I’m here for pithy comments and impish retorts.

 

Good show Kev-

P

 

The fact that my brother was quite a well known paleontologist probably helps some.

thank you both, I've learnt something new and it's kind of related to some of my other hobbies (fishing, fish keeping and pub quizzing - well answering questions wrong and consuming large amounts of beer ! ).

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7 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


…for a sec there I thought perhaps no one on LSP would know what I was talking about.

I’m here for pithy comments and impish retorts.

 

Good show Kev-

P

Hey, most of us know things other than P-40 seat types and RLM late war colors!

The first Coelacanth found was bright blue and obviously stunned paleontologists! I believe I always knew about this species from books we had at home. I will admit I did not know until recently how to pronounce the « Coe », when I watched a video on YouTube about it.

 

Alain

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3 hours ago, ivanmoe said:

You guys who are talking Coelacanth are really dating yourselves, as that was in the news a LONG time ago, not in living-fossil terms, mind you, but certainly from a human perspective.


I have a proclivity for obscure facts like this one. The analogy was just too perfect to not throw out there..glad some folks got the reference to the not so extinct fish..

The irony of your reply made me chuckle; because by making the comment above, you too dated yourself! If that was on purpose I appreciate it; because that is great high-brow humor! And if not..we’ll..it’s still funny.

good stuff.

 

My being able to rectally-extract facts like the Coelacanth is the source of much eye-rolling by my friends and family; but everyone always wants me on their team for trivia night at the bar.

 

Happy for the folks who are excited about the Devestator. I built the Monogram 48th kit as a kid..and I think I eventually blew it up in the backyard with a string of firecrackers.

 

cheers

Pete

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22 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


…for a sec there I thought perhaps no one on LSP would know what I was talking about.

I’m here for pithy comments and impish retorts.

 

Good show Kev-

P

ATTEMPT?….PFFT!

Besides there was a direct call to action.

 

As to the Devastator, the wacky Rube Goldberg canopy is a defining feature.  The very part shrouded in that picture.  Hope they got it right.

 

Also, if not, scientists will debate for years whether it’s a genuine coelacanth. 

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Like some on here, coelacanths have seemingly always been part of my life: my mother in particular was very much into archaeology, paleontology and Egyptology. Those were the days of Jacques Cousteau and David Attenborough (surely the only human who deserves the title 'living legend') and so it seemed to be ubiquitous. Certainly back then that the kids at school knew what a coelacanth was (1970s) because it would be part of class discussions. Nowadays there is a tendency to dismiss the past as 'before my time', as if it's an excuse for ignorance.

 

Anyway thanks for bringing some randomness to Hyperscale. The TBD-1 looks good too :) 

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