Jump to content

ZM Bf 109G-14 review on Hyperscale


Kagemusha
 Share

Recommended Posts

A small correction needs to be made to that article. 

In relation to the "early" Erla canopy, Vincent said: 

"Second style, the "cutout", which was most commonly seen on planes with a retrofitted Erla canopy BUT the kit does not provide the U shaped bracket that was installed on the rear cockpit deck for that option so I'd skip using the cutout canopy unless you know for a fact that the plane you are modelling was a retrofit and you're willing to scratch the bracket. The bracket might be offered on subsequent versions of this kit - I don't know"

However. in the same article he provided a photo of the "missing part", respectively the "canopy jettison mechanism" (not a "bracket") on the left side of this photo: 

 

39_fs.jpg

 

So, no, no part is missing from the "early" Erla canopy and if one wants to create such a model, the parts are in the box. 

HTH 

Radu 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just had a phone conversation about the above post. What is the difference  between the two types of Erla canopies? 

 

Here is the initial type of canopy. This used the same canopy emergency jettison mechanism used on the "box-type" canopies. Please have a look at this photo: 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQH59QZTAayKKtiLGgwJtM

The two short tubes inside the curved frame contain compressed springs, the top end of each spring attached to the frame and the bottom end of each spring attached to the fuselage. The frame is held in place by two pins at the bottom. The pins are linked to a scissor mechanism contained underneath the horizontal device at the bottom of the frame. The device at the botom of the frame also contains a hole for the canopy hinge pin at the right and the hole for the canopy closing latch on the left. When the canopy jettison lever located under the windscreen on the left side of the cockpit is pulled, the two pins of the "scissor" mechamism are retracted and the springs push the frame away from the fuselage, which takes away with it the canopy itself. This is basically the same principle used on the box-type canopy and even earlier on the Bf 109 E with the curved top canopy. 

 

This type of canopy can be identified in photos by the cutout at the left rear bottom edge of the canopy, as shown in these photos: 

eCpwpuo.jpeg

 

bf109JG11.jpg

 

 

 

 

The final version of the Erla canopy had a much simpler mechanism consisting of one single bar, as shown in this photo: 

08fd8ccd8fccf6a78d59f083ba435d53.jpg

 

The bar contained a hole for the hinge pin on the right and a hole for the canopy locking pin on the left. This bar is attached to the cockpit will with a latch. When the canopy jettison toggle and cable (no longer a "lever") under the windscreen on the left side of the cockpit was pulled, this released the latch that secured the bar to the cockpit shelf and the whole thing was pulled by the airflow. 

 

One can identify this kind of canopy by the bubble/bump at the left rear bottom edge of the canopy, as shown in these photos. 

 

Bf_109_18_Erla.jpg

 

Bf_109_G_canopy_Erla_Haube_7.JG_108_Summ

 

I hope this helps identify the type of canopy used on your subject of choice. Check the photos and look for the "cut" or the "bubble" on the left side of the canopy. 

Radu 

Edited by Radub
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was just thinking to myself how nice it would be to have a pic of this installation and lo and behold you came thru not only with pics BUT an explanation on how it works! Now here's another question. Is there any reason why some planes have the antenna wire go to a mast and others have the wire go straight to the fuselage spine? I'm looking for patterns in the chaos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, CRAZY IVAN5 said:

Is there any reason why some planes have the antenna wire go to a mast and others have the wire go straight to the fuselage spine? I'm looking for patterns in the chaos

 

I do not have a clear explanation, but I was told that it may have something to do with the radio frequency. Technically that may be an answer because there is a corelation between frequency and the length of the antenna wire. This may help explaining it better. To quote Google: "The length of the antenna is inversely proportional to the frequency and directly proportional to the wavelength. The higher the frequency and the shorter the wavelength, the shorter the antenna can be made". An antenna on a mast is longer than an antenna connected to the fuselage. However, I must stress that I do not have any hard evidence that was the reason why some antennas are on a mast and some are not. 

HTH 

Radu 

Edited by Radub
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only complaint with this kit I have [ if you can even call it a complaint] ,is they give you all the optional parts but no references in the instructions on how to install them . I'm figuring it out though, but as someone who isn't really up to speed on 109s , it's an adventure to be sure. thankfully we have people like Radu, and others to help out and that's greatly appreciated , Believe me there will be more questions to follow

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know I read it somewhere on here about wooden footrests ,I can't find anything on them ,like what they look like, are they included in the kit , I know they went to these to save metal . I looked at the sprues and there is an alternate floor board with the oblong "plates?" would these be what is being talked about? See? I told you there would be more stupid questions LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/18/2022 at 7:41 AM, CRAZY IVAN5 said:

The only complaint with this kit I have [ if you can even call it a complaint] ,is they give you all the optional parts but no references in the instructions on how to install them . I'm figuring it out though, but as someone who isn't really up to speed on 109s , it's an adventure to be sure. thankfully we have people like Radu, and others to help out and that's greatly appreciated , Believe me there will be more questions to follow


Any and all additional parts available in this kit … or any kit for that matter will have their uses … sometimes the instructions give you “Options” to build a choice between one variation or another - depending on the markings you utilise - and these options would be given to you in the build instructions and decals supplied. In this case, however, you’re only supposed to be building ONE aircraft - that of Eric Hartmann and the instructions and markings are given for that purpose only.
 

The reason for the “optioned” parts is the result of an engineering / tooling / budgeting decision I would think … Dragon models do a similar thing with their armour kits - providing a load of “unused” parts off the sprues - because they are tooled for another kit (with those options) or another variant …

 

Soon there will be a G2 or G4 or G6 or G10 boxing with the same cowl sprue, clear sprue etc - and just a different decal sheet and instruction booklet.

 

I hope they do the F series at some point and we could do with a good K also - while they have Radu working with the team … those kits will also require additional tooling!

 

Rog :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The champions of unused parts in kits is Eduard. I have boxes of spares from Spitfires, Fw190's, Bf109's etc (1/48) and I reckon they'll eventually end up in the recycle bin because even though you think you can use them it never seems to happen.

 

TRF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...