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Hasegawa 1/32 Fw 190D-9 Late "Brown 4"


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I would agree with in Thomas 'concern above (fabric covered blades) and looking at an artifact 77 years plus isn't the same.  (general wear and tear over 77 years). Not to say these epic builds are nothing but breathtaking is an understatement.  John, we follow all your brilliant builds with total amazement.   We mortals just suggest!  Carry on.  

We are the true believers.  :bow:  Carry on your brilliant artist license as always and forevermore.  Please?    Sensational build going on here.  Wow, wow, wow.   

 

Kindest regards from Catalonia SPAIN.  

 

T

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Thanks guys!  I appreciate all of the comments.  I have so much respect and admiration for the talented modelers here that I'm amazed that little ole me is building and talking model-building amongst ya'll.  Truly an honor!

 

Like it or not, the prop blades are done.  I've mounted them onto the hub.  It's a tight friction fit, with no need for glue.  I may ease a drop of CA glue into the joints for security. The salt fade effect is very subtle and it can appear and disappear, depending on the angle of the perspective.
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The backs of the blades were given a single dose of salt without any post-Micromeshing so this gives a good example of what an unaltered salt fading application looks like.
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A closer view of the back of the blades with the offending wood grain tips.
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With the help of the two hidden magnets, the spinner snaps into place nicely.
IMG-2929.jpg

 

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Thanks guys! Appreciate all of the comments!

 

As the prop blades are finished, it's now time to paint the spinner.  I normally don't do this but I thought I'd try to put a pre-shade pattern down on the spinner to give the white base a little bit of depth/texture.  High contrast tends to kill this type of effect but I thought I'd give it try.  The pattern is obtained by shooting the airbrush through a piece of scouring pad.
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The pre-shade effect is modulated by applying thin coats of the final color.  The white is built up slowly until almost all traces of the pre-shade mottle are gone.
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Digital photography has a hard time picking up the effect but hopefully you can just make out the pre-shade layer.
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For the spiral, I use custom masks cut from Oramask 810.  The shapes are traced from various EagleCal decal sheets in my spare box.  The Oramask is great material for spirals because it holds it shapes well but also has a certain amount of stretch so you can usually force it into position without the mask lifting or kinking.
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The spinner is then sprayed black.
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After drying, the mask is carefully peeled off.
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It looks like I got a pretty good spiral on the first attempt, which is often not the case!
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All is not perfect though as I got some unintended spray texture on the black that needs to be cleaned up.  I'm going to let the paint fully cure because the last thing you want to do is sand or micomesh soft paint.
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Spinner looks great! The Oramask material is the same as Maketar uses for their masks. I used Maketar masks for the main markings on my Dora -- I agree with your comments -- good stuff. I'll have to try this technique -- next time!  lol. 

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On 9/4/2022 at 7:27 PM, Thunnus said:

Thanks guys!  I appreciate all of the comments.  I have so much respect and admiration for the talented modelers here that I'm amazed that little ole me is building and talking model-building amongst ya'll.  Truly an honor!

 

Like it or not, the prop blades are done.  I've mounted them onto the hub.  It's a tight friction fit, with no need for glue.  I may ease a drop of CA glue into the joints for security. The salt fade effect is very subtle and it can appear and disappear, depending on the angle of the perspective.
IMG-2922.jpg


IMG-2923.jpg

 

 

The backs of the blades were given a single dose of salt without any post-Micromeshing so this gives a good example of what an unaltered salt fading application looks like.
IMG-2924.jpg

 

 

A closer view of the back of the blades with the offending wood grain tips.
IMG-2926.jpg
IMG-2927.jpg

 

 

With the help of the two hidden magnets, the spinner snaps into place nicely.
IMG-2929.jpg

 

that propeller is a model on its own,, and the way you dealt with it..

nothing  to say that hasn't been said already John!  just keep building and i 'll keep watching and learning!

(by the way i think i have to get one of these..)

 

S.

Edited by duke_
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Thanks guys!  Have been pretty busy so have not had much modeling time.  One more bass fishing trip this weekend and my season will be over.  So I'll be transitioning back to modeling soon!

 

The spinner for Brown 4 is finished.  After a dark pastel wash, I topped it off with a flat coat and a couple rounds of salt fading, which are barely visible.
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Here's a sneak peak at the finished prop mounted on the unpainted aircraft.
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The spinner is fully removable!  You may notice the a small errant scratch on the horizontal panel line of the radiator cowling.  There are a number of these where my scriber went astray.  They've been repaired with black CA glue so they are still visible but they will disappear under a coat of paint (hopefully).
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Man what an expert finish on the prop/spinner.  You know it is astounding how different that prop is to US or British props.  Small diameter with wide chord versus large diameter with narrower chord.  

 

I suppose a small diameter fuselage means the effective portion of the prop can begin closer to the hub.  And the good folks at Focke-Wulf did everything they could to make a small diameter fuselage.  Mustangs and Spits and BF-190's all have small cross-section fuselages, and their props are not very large diameter.  But not to this extent.

 

Thunderbolts and Corsairs and Hellcats, etc, have giant props.  But I think this can be mostly explained by the large diameter of the big P&W R-2800 engine.  The effective prop section has to be just outboard of the nose cowl, which has a large diameter of its own. 

 

Still - it appears to me that there are two ways to go to get equivalent thrust out of a propeller given a certain amount of available engine torque - large dia / narrow chord versus small dia / large chord. 

 

Things that make you go hmmmm.  

Edited by JayW
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