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Airfix 1/24 Spitfire

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Thanks for your encouraging comments. Brian, if there's anyone who is qualified to dispense lessons on building a Spitfire, it's you.

Ango: I do use brass for some assemblies. there are several reasons for this. Brass is far stronger than plastic, especially when working with 0.1 or 0.2 mm sheet. It can be cut, filed and shaped quite easily (after annealing) and it can be photo-etched. I've got one of those DIY photo-etch sets that looks very much like a child's mad-scientist lab kit. The results, while very far from Eduard standard, are perfectly acceptable for my purposes. Another advantage of brass is that it can be soldered; combined with the use of simple self-made jigs, this provides for solid and true bonding. Finally, it can be machined. A while back I invested in a chinese-manufactured lathe and mill. It takes a lot of work to tune them up (there are internet sites that explain exactly how to do it), but they are capable of very fine, accurate work. I'll include "process" pictures in my next post. Just bear in mind that all these techniques are still new to me and I can claim no, and I mean NO expertise whatsoever.

 

Cheers, Jean

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this is some basolutely high end modelling! i am deeply impressed. whats your source of 0.1 and 0.2mm brass-sheet. i cant get such tight diameters here. in the shops i know they start from 0.5mm which is too thick for modelling purpose. i guess such sheets could be a very fine addition to the use of can and package aluminium i am using normally.

 

glad the toothpick trick workes for you. i guess you have rapidely reduced your lossrate on "screws".

 

your soldering is stunning. i have to get into metal work too. the results are top class. and to be honest... it is just way cooler to have parts made of metal than of plastic. even if they might look similar once they are assembled. its a bit crazy but thats the way most of us are here.

 

seeing this last update, i have to add one more progress report to my absolutely favourites here.

 

thanks for sharing that. would you mind telling how much such a lathe would cost about?

 

cheers klaus

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Thanks for your kind words Klaus, though I have to say that what you, Radu and others achieve with plastic is tops in the coolness stakes. I started experimenting with brass in fact because I could never put plastic together to a decent standard, everything ended up rickety, asymmetric and out-of-true.

I obtain the thin brass sheet from a local dealer in Paris (where I live during the week for work). It is sold in strips 30cm wide, minimum length 100cm. There are also several mail-order houses in France that stock the stuff. Anyway I´m in Vienna every weekend (that´s where my family lives), I could send you some directly if that could help you out. E-mail me.

The lathe cost about 500€. I got it through the French agent of a Dutch firm that receives them straight from Shanghai. Not a small sum, but compared to what you would pay for a Unimat 1 (nice, but a toy), a bit more money gets you get a real 300mm bed-length machine with lots of potential.

I look forward to your future updates as always.

 

Cheers, Jean

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Guest LSP_Jay L

The lathe cost about 500€. I got it through the French agent of a Dutch firm that receives them straight from Shanghai. Not a small sum, but compared to what you would pay for a Unimat 1 (nice, but a toy), a bit more money gets you get a real 300mm bed-length machine with lots of potential.

Hi Jean;

 

If your man with the lathes want's to have one reviewed with the intention of selling a shedload, we would be happy to have a sample here for LSP. :lol: :lol:

 

Cheers mate,

 

Jay

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If your man with the lathes want's to have one reviewed with the intention of selling a shedload, we would be happy to have a sample here for LSP. :blink: :lol:

You sneaky little bugger Jay! :) That's come straight from Uncle Jay's dirty tricks department, I reckon! ;) Sheesh....any means to pick up some free sh!t. :P

 

Jean, I now understand a bit better what you are doing to produce such stunning results. Thanks for the explanation. Would be great to see some shots of your lathe, etching, and soldering techniques in action, if you can manage it at some stage?! :D

 

Great work,

Ango.

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Jay and Ango,

 

The Chinese lathes are marketed in the UK under the Chester brand-name. The one I have is the same as the Chester Conquest 7 x 12 lathe. You can check it out by googling Conquest lathe

 

Cheers, Jean

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p.s.For more info, check out "mini-lathe.com" (sorry, don´t know how to create a hypertext link)

Jean

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The six weeks since my last post have been spent on the frustrating task of making the elevator trim wheel. I wrote at the time that this was promising to be fun, little did I know how much.

The general approach was suggested by http--www.simhardware.org-index.html (cockpit page 1). So with the lathe, the first step was to turn the spindle

post-4-1148569008_thumb.jpg

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Next stage, after parting, was to put the piece in a chuck mounted on a rotary table for drilling 18 x 0.50mm holes with the mill

post-4-1148569245_thumb.jpg

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