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Kotare 1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia (Mid), with Mk.I (Early) and Mk.Va announced


John Stambaugh
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On 9/22/2022 at 10:23 AM, npb748r said:

I just did the same, I was going to resist as that's over a months modelling budget for me and I already have 5 early Revell Spits built. However, I want Kotare to produce more and varied kits and they will only do that if these sell well. Also looking to get the Southern Expo Hornchurch decals mentioned in this thread, one of the HE111's shot down by Malan crashed about a mile from where I live and it's got a sky blue underside rather than sky so will add something different to my collection. Now just need to tell the wife I need to dip into the housekeeping pot - gulp !!!

Or turn the heating off for a day Or you could argue the £67 gizzit from the Government actually means the kit is only £30 something pounds:ph34r:

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On 9/24/2022 at 8:19 AM, Gazzas said:

Just pre-ordered mine.  Gonna go Aussie.

 

92fGBG.jpg

 

Pat Hughes - nice choice but a different version of the Spitfire Mk I. X4009 is a later production Mk I by the Kotare definition. Kotare are doing a mid-production here, and apparently a letter version to follow.

 

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On 9/20/2022 at 7:52 AM, Pete Roberts said:

Some observations re: early production Spitfire Mk I’s. These planes were equipped with a ring and bead gunsight. The canopy was flat topped and sided, and the windscreen was unarmoured. No armour plate in the cockpit. The cockpit door lock was operated by a wire and ring pull. There was no deflection plate over the fuel tanks. It had a two bladed prop and twin prong pitot tube. Note the pole type antenna. Some very early aircraft had an anti-fouling structure at the top of the fin, but this was later removed. Some of the gun muzzles protruded from the wing leading edge. The guys at Kotare are also investigating the stencils, which may have also evolved over the course of production. THAT is the level of detail these guys are going to. I don’t have any info on this.

 

In the photo of the 65 Squadron aircraft Tuck is in K9906, FZ-L, and further back Gordon Olive is flying K9903, FZ-A. The serial on the fuselage has been overpainted, but you can just make it out on Tucks plane if you look carefully. You can also see the new placement of the serial, in 2” characters, on the fin where the fin flash would later be placed. Note the fuselage roundels have also been modified to Type B. No lower wing roundels, lower surfaces painted white/black split down the centre line. When first manufactured these planes would have had aluminium lower surfaces with the serial repeated under the wings.

 

The fact that Kotare have identified ‘early’, ‘mid’ and ‘late’ production Spitfire Mk I’s has me thinking they’ll do kitsets of all three types. May be a case of patience… yeah, I know. <_<

 

 

My apologies folks - neglected to mention the machine gun heating. Initial a/c did not have this, but later on heating was introduced from the engine with ducting exiting at the wingtips incorporating semi-conical fairings.

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20 hours ago, Kagemusha said:

 

Sadly the link doesn't take you to the specific page, so here's the blurb, in which it contains in depth details of the three Spitfire Mk.I variants;

 

"117 high-quality injection moulded plastic parts - 35cm wingspan - Optional DeHavilland and Rotol propellers - Optional TR.9D and TR.1133 wireless controllers and aerials - Optional pilot’s seats with and without Sutton Type K harness detail - Optional open and closed cockpit doors - Optional open and closed canopy & hood - 28 page fully illustrated instruction manual - Hand pump undercarriage retraction and wheel well jack detail - Wheels with weighted tyres featuring correct alignment - High quality Cartograf decals with 3 mid-production Spitfire Mk.Ia colour schemes.

The legendary Supermarine Type 300 “Spitfire” is undoubtedly one of the most famous, and perhaps the most beautiful, aircraft of all time. Designed from 1934 under the guidance of Supermarine Aviation Works’ chief designer Reginald Mitchell, Joseph Smith and “Alf” Faddy, the 990hp Rolls-Royce Merlin “C” powered prototype first flew on 5 March 1936. It was immediately obvious that it was something very special and an initial production order was placed in early June 1936 for 310 aircraft. Numerous delays at Supermarine and many of the approximately 150 sub-contractors ensured that the first production Spitfire was not completed until mid-May 1938 and the final aircraft from the order was only delivered in September 1939.

 

Early production Spitfire Mk.I in the K9### & L10## serial number range (completed between May 1938 and September 1939), were initially powered by a 1030hp Rolls-Royce Merlin II engine and featured a 2-blade fixed pitch propeller, 8 Browning .303” machine guns, triple ejector nozzle outlet exhaust manifolds, a tall un-tapered aerial mastt and a rear fuselage adorned with raised rivets for ease of construction. The main planes and front of the fuselage were flush riveted and puttied and sanded smooth for improved performance. Numerous improvements were introduced throughout production, most of which were eventually retrofitted to earlier aircraft which included gun heating, Rolls-Royce Merlin III engine, 3-blade dual-pitch DeHavilland propeller, exhaust manifolds of simplified construction, a taller canopy hood for improved visibility, armoured windscreen glass and protective plating over the upper fuel tank which necessitated shortening the engine cowlings slightly. 

 

Mid production Mk.Ia in the N3### & P9### serial number range (completed between September 1939 and April 1940), saw the introduction of an improved lever-operated “dual position” cockpit door catch, reflector gun sight, tapered aerial post, voltage regulator positioned behind the pilot’s headrest and a constant speed DeHavilland propeller. On selected aircraft, a constant speed Rotol RX5/1 propeller and the temporary installation of the TR.1133 VHF radio, which did not require an external aerial wire. 

 

Late production Mk.Ia in the R6####, R7### & X4### serial number range (completed between May 1940 and April 1941) and AR2## (from July 1941 to January 1942) saw the introduction of constant speed DeHavilland propellers and armour plates behind the pilot’s seat & headrest (which were retrofitted to earlier production aircraft) as well as engine driven undercarriage retraction. Other incremental changes were introduced such as a composite “plastic” seat, fire-proof bulkhead, revised “raised rivet” radio access door, station keeping lights in the fuel tank plating, re-installation of the TR.1133 VHF radio and saw the elimination of the gauge for the top fuel tank, fuel pressure gauge, priming cock and front parachute flare tube. Some Mk.I were armed with 2 Hispano 20mm cannons and were designated the Spitfire Mk.Ib (at which time the 8 gun armed aircraft was re-designated the Mk.Ia). The cannons proved to be so unreliable that the Mk.Ib was withdrawn from service until improvements had been made in late 1940. Numerous engine, airframe and armament improvements were made to the Spitfire before production ceased in 1948, by which time over 22000 had been produced in 2-dozen variants with the most notable being the 1030hp Mk.I, 1470hp Mk.V, 1720hp Mk.IX, 2035hp Mk.XIV, the photo-reconnaissance Mk.XI and the navalised Seafire Mk.III. 

 

Spitfire Mk.I colour schemes are surprisingly varied and complicated. Interior areas were primed with light grey before being painted aluminium, except for the cockpit between frames 8 & 11 which was painted in a colour described as “Supermarine green” and “apple green”. Note that this is different from the paler, greyer, “Grey Green” (of which various colour mixes have additionally been noted) used on later production Spitfires built by other manufacturers. Major internal components supplied by sub-contractors could be delivered in various shades of grey-green or aluminium or even black.

 

The underside paint finish varied greatly throughout Mk.I production and service, initially being painted aluminium until late April 1939 when the port side was painted Night (black) and the starboard white (split along the centreline). Then from late February 1940, supposedly all “white” except for the port main plane (only) which was Night, although photographic evidence indicates that the undersides of the nose, rear fuselage and tailplane were usually painted with aluminium. From June 1940 the undersides were supposed to be painted “Sky Type S…duck egg bluish green” but sky grey and sky blue also appear to have been used and then from November 1940 the port main plane (only) was again finished in Night. Aircraft were re-painted in various interpretations of these specifications in the field as time and supplies of paint (including local mixes) allowed, which ensured that a wide variety of finishes were possible.

 

Contemporary photos confirm different shades of Dark Earth and Dark Green (even on the same airframe) which were applied with a hard demarcation line. Spitfire Mk.I camouflage was applied in 2 designs, the A and B schemes which were mirrors of each other. Spitfire sub-assemblies were usually supplied pre-painted so a single aircraft could exhibit a variety of shades, and sometimes the camouflage pattern would not match perfectly from one sub-assembly/component to the next. Additionally, extensive weathering and re-painting also helped ensure that a wide variety of tonal differences could be seen. The fabric covered rudder, elevator and ailerons were undercoated in red-brown dope before being painted and frequently appear paler than the adjacent camouflaged metal parts. Therefore, unfortunately, there is no “one true” Dark Earth, Dark Green, Sky Type S or interior grey-green paint colour suitable for all Spitfire Mk.I models so, while we have tried our best with our paint suggestions, there is no doubt many will disagree with us. Which is OK."

 

Mark Styling has produced a great many profiles, which you should be able to match up to the kits. Link

 

Ah, actually, it does. You have to scroll down for the info.

 

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Sorry if it’s a bit left field, but is this fuselage (not wings) suitable for a Vc? I’m not completely up with spitfire variants but have started converting the Tamiya kit. The wings are done but I have a feeling the fuse was raised head riveted? Which might mean I could graft it onto my Tamiya early C wing I have done? If it fits of course lol

 

Cheers Anthony 

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12 minutes ago, Anthony in NZ said:

Sorry if it’s a bit left field, but is this fuselage (not wings) suitable for a Vc? I’m not completely up with spitfire variants but have started converting the Tamiya kit. The wings are done but I have a feeling the fuse was raised head riveted? Which might mean I could graft it onto my Tamiya early C wing I have done? If it fits of course lol

 

Cheers Anthony 

 

Yep, should do although I have to admit I haven’t looked too closely at the lumps and bumps on top of the cowling. You may want to check them. You will likely need a new windscreen, with internal armour, a mirror, and the later bulged hood. Instrumentation and some controls also likely changed in the cockpit - certainly the radio controls changed.

 

Re: the wings, the wheel well changed, sloping up and out towards the wingtips (prior to that, up and back towards the wing trailing edge) and the u/c doors are bulged down their length. Cannon bulge could be broad or narrow - I presume you have already incorporated these in your wing?

 

Will be interesting to see how the wing fits. I haven’t found any Spitfire wings that have been a good fit with other Spitfire kits, including those done by the same manufacturer! 

Edited by Pete Roberts
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29 minutes ago, Pete Roberts said:

 

Yep, should do although I have to admit I haven’t looked too closely at the lumps and bumps on top of the cowling. You may want to check them. You will likely need a new windscreen, with internal armour, a mirror, and the later bulged hood. Instrumentation and some controls also likely changed in the cockpit - certainly the radio controls changed.

 

Re: the wings, the wheel well changed, sloping up and out towards the wingtips (prior to that, up and back towards the wing trailing edge) and the u/c doors are bulged down their length. Cannon bulge could be broad or narrow - I presume you have already incorporated these in your wing?

 

Will be interesting to see how the wing fits. I haven’t found any Spitfire wings that have been a good fit with other Spitfire kits, including those done by the same manufacturer! 

Thanks Pete!

so from what I’m understanding, Kotare raised head rivet fuselage, Tamiya C wing backdated (already done) and use the Tamiya u/c doors. I’ll have to check the wall angles. Tamiya cockpit and windscreen on Kotare fuse and check lumps and bumps on cowls. Oh and good luck to me trying to get the wing to fit lol

 

Thanks so very much for your help. Johnny Checketts ended up becoming a very good friend who lived just 5min from home. I really want to build his D Day Vc and showed me his album with them in

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1 hour ago, Anthony in NZ said:

Thanks Pete!

so from what I’m understanding, Kotare raised head rivet fuselage, Tamiya C wing backdated (already done) and use the Tamiya u/c doors. I’ll have to check the wall angles. Tamiya cockpit and windscreen on Kotare fuse and check lumps and bumps on cowls. Oh and good luck to me trying to get the wing to fit lol

 

Thanks so very much for your help. Johnny Checketts ended up becoming a very good friend who lived just 5min from home. I really want to build his D Day Vc and showed me his album with them in

 

Sounds like a great build Anthony. You are very lucky to be able to say you had such a relationship with a vet like that. 

 

Yes, fingers crossed on that wing fit; may be a bit of fernangling required. One other thing that comes to mind - you’ll need a new prop and spinner as well. I’m not too clued up on that side of things, but I think this has been discussed a bit over on Brit Modeller.  

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There is a wild card in all of this, Kotare have made it clear they are going to do multiple variants.  Also it is not uncommon to have additional parts on the sprue not used for a given boxing, we need to see exactly what is coming in the box as it could very well be the case there are more variant possibilities in the box than on the instructions or decals.  We have some photos of built kits with sprues in the back ground but I could not tell anything from those photos.  

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On 9/20/2022 at 5:02 AM, Out2gtcha said:

I wonder how early they will go...

 

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I know I'll be happy with a model of Clive du Cros' replica but I'm not sure many others will be when they discover the differences between G-BRDV and K5054!! :D

Edited by KiwiZac
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Well it all sounds very promising I will be getting one or two being a spitfire fan ! I like the simple options that they are doing,  no engine,  but open or closed canopy access door, prop options etc. Very well thoght out.

regards

jon

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  • Kagemusha changed the title to Kotare 1/32 Spitfire Mk.Ia (Mid), with Mk.I (Early) and Mk.Va announced

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