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A-4 half & half


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Awesome, that'd make for an interesting model ...

As for the crewman on the wing, was that to settle the jet to disengage the arresting cable from the tailhook ?

Thanks Jari ...

 

-Gregg

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2 hours ago, GreyGhost said:

As for the crewman on the wing, was that to settle the jet to disengage the arresting cable from the tailhook ?

 

-Gregg

 

Hmm, I don't think so. There is another crew member who disengages the tail hook. I just thought it was a bit strange.

 

Cheers

Rainer

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10 hours ago, Finn said:

I'm guessing a clean or freshly painted tail section on this Skyhawk at the 1:43 mark:

 

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/84193

 

Jari

Great Video!  My guess is that airplane just came from the depot at Cubi Point and they didn't have time to put squadron markings on her before she ended up on the flight schedule.  Perhaps major damage that necessitated swapping out the aft part of the fuselage. That is where the split is for engine change...?

5 hours ago, Rainer Hoffmann said:

Great footage, Jari. Thanks for sharing this.

 

I'm wondering why one guy always hangs himself on the wing tip of the Skyhawks? Any ideas?

 

Cheers

Rainer

My guess is that it's a simple way to help get the aircraft turning out of the landing area. Early Skyhawks didn't have nose wheel steering and that nose wheel is free-castering (like a shopping cart wheel). Combined the the wind over the deck and steering via brakes only, a man's weight (or skinny teenager) was likely enough to help that right brake and get the airplane turning.  Once it was out of the landing area, a tiller bar could be stuck on the nose gear to help steer them towards their parking spot. Just a hunch though! Also love the bird being shown at 1:55...kids!

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20 hours ago, easixpedro said:

Great Video!  My guess is that airplane just came from the depot at Cubi Point and they didn't have time to put squadron markings on her before she ended up on the flight schedule.  Perhaps major damage that necessitated swapping out the aft part of the fuselage. That is where the split is for engine change...?

My guess is that it's a simple way to help get the aircraft turning out of the landing area. Early Skyhawks didn't have nose wheel steering and that nose wheel is free-castering (like a shopping cart wheel). Combined the the wind over the deck and steering via brakes only, a man's weight (or skinny teenager) was likely enough to help that right brake and get the airplane turning.  Once it was out of the landing area, a tiller bar could be stuck on the nose gear to help steer them towards their parking spot. Just a hunch though! Also love the bird being shown at 1:55...kids!

 

That's a very good idea. Peter. I didn't know, that early Skyhawks ddn't have nose wheel steering.

 

Cheers

Rainer

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