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Boeing 777 engine failure-no casualties


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2 hours ago, LSP_Ron said:

And full of fuel to make Hawaii

 

Probably only about 1/2 to 2/3 full for DEN-HNL (2924 nm).  That's barely a touch and go for a 777-200ER.  But in any event, pretty scary, and a good job by the crew.  Makes you realize how strong those engine/pylon attach bolts are, the way that thing was oscillating.  

Edited by Jennings Heilig
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1 hour ago, Jennings Heilig said:

 

Probably only about 1/2 to 2/3 full for DEN-HNL (2924 nm).  That's barely a touch and go for a 777-200ER.  


Seriously? The point is, they were friggin’ heavy as shi+ 

They were over max landing weight for their emergency return..don’t know if they dumped fuel, but regardless, they had their hands full. I’ve got about 600 hours in the 777 (not much) but I know how challenging this situation was-

P

Edited by Pete Fleischmann
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I am sure it was hairy. High alt airport, loaded plane, one engine and the other probably shaking the wing like mad. I wonder if they had time to dump much fuel? 
Reminds me of an addage I read from some US WWII fighter pilot: “The only time you have too much fuel is when you are on fire!” I am sure they had to do some serious cleaning of the cabin seats after that one. Kudos to the crew to get it down safely.

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My word there is some sensationalist 'reporting' used in that article - no wonder the Mail is known as the 'Daily Fail' by so many in the UK.

 

'The troubled history of the 777'... despite it being one of the safest airliners in service. Quick! Let's dig up every single 777-related incident to sensationalise this as much as we can and let everyone know how dangerous the 777 is! Don't fly on triple-sevens, folks!

'We started going down' - well of course you did - the pilots immediately started a return back which, believe it or not, means getting closer to the ground as one has to land.

'I looked out of the window and the engine was missing'. No it wasn't. The forward cowling had come away - which of course is far from ideal but the engine was very much there. If it was a fan blade or compressor failure then the cowl did exactly as it was supposed to and protected the aircraft from flying debris. Kudos to Pratt for the engine casing doing exactly what it was supposed to.

'We could feel the heat of the fire through the fuselage!' - Really? Travelling at 250mph+ with a hurricane-force slipstream and you felt the heat? I smell a rat!

And as we've started, let's drag up every incident from the past about United and what a terrible airline they are - as well as highlight the serious flaws in airline safety as a whole!

 

Absolutely pathetic.

 

As others have said, well done to the crew who appeared to have managed the situation with total professionalism - very much the opposite of those who write articles such as this whose job it is to put such 'quotes' from those who were there into context.

 

Tom

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Those were some pretty healthy parts raining down on the burbs for a bit there.  I agree with the cops - the potential for injuries on the ground was pretty high.  They were lucky.  I’m always amazed at how airline pilots can sit there bored out of their minds for thousands of hours on end and then, when SHTF like lightning out of nowhere, they rise to the occasion in an actual life or death situation like they do it every day.  I was particularly amused when one of the crew told Denver they needed a minute to run some checklists.  Here you have a heavy airplane full of gas and people, one turning and one burning, shedding parts all over the place, and these guys take the time to break out the book to make sure they don’t screw something up.  And then they grease it on.  Ya just gotta love ‘em.

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More bad reporting:

"...sitting on a plane thousands of miles in the air" no comment!

"...purportedly filmed from onboard United flight 328" shows the blown engine on fire through visible cabin window!

"...what appears to be an engine cowling in front of a home..." yeah, the whole front of the cowl, but what else could it be?

 

Alain

 

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25 minutes ago, Oldbaldguy said:

Those were some pretty healthy parts raining down on the burbs for a bit there.  I agree with the cops - the potential for injuries on the ground was pretty high.  They were lucky.  I’m always amazed at how airline pilots can sit there bored out of their minds for thousands of hours on end and then, when SHTF like lightning out of nowhere, they rise to the occasion in an actual life or death situation like they do it every day.  I was particularly amused when one of the crew told Denver they needed a minute to run some checklists.  Here you have a heavy airplane full of gas and people, one turning and one burning, shedding parts all over the place, and these guys take the time to break out the book to make sure they don’t screw something up.  And then they grease it on.  Ya just gotta love ‘em.

Not to take anything away from them, but it is kinda their job to do that. Running checklists in an emergency isn't some sort of act of supreme level-headed calmness, it's what they're trained to do. That crew has probably flown exactly that kind of emergency - the loss of an engine - a hundred times in a simulator before it happened to them in real life.

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