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I never get tired of Phantoms :)


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1 hour ago, easixpedro said:

 

 

 

 

Pretty horrific story... launching for the flyoff to go home following Coral Sea's 69-70 cruise (literally pulling into Alameda rhe next day). Tension was released on the shuttle and bridle right before the cat fired. Without tension, the bridle ripped the nose gear off. They both got out, but the pilot, LCDR Keating was killed. Remember the ship is moving at easily 25 knots...he came down in his chute and hit the wing of a Phantom in line for the catapult before disappearing over the side. The backseater came down on the flight deck and flight deck crewmen were able to collapse his chute and save him.

 

You can read about it here, about halfway down the page: pics and personal accounts.

http://usscoralsea.net/mishaps2.php?#subtop

 

-Peter

What a fascinating and yet thoroughly depressing website.    Lot of ways to die on a carrier.     

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2 hours ago, John1 said:

No idea on the picture above, however I do have a question - for an early Vietnam War F-4C, would it have had the non-stick surface coating applied to the topsides of the fuselage?

Nope. Factory-painted airframes (LGG/White and SEA camouflage) just had the small black walkway painted on the main wing at the forward portion of the chord/wing root; but there was no texture at that point. USAF depot-painted airframes did not typically have that walkway on the main wing root in the Rolling Thunder (1966-68) camouflage era.

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3 hours ago, allthumbs said:

What’s odd about this Phantom?

 

EgDRg6g.jpg

 

 

 

No LAU-17 inner pylons? As an early B-model, note the short chin pod nose cap, in place of a live IRST dome (pre-RHAW installation with the extended chin cap and the acorn on the trailing edge of the vertical fin cap); and it has the straight/narrow leading edge trim on the stabs, prior to the addition of the trapezoidal counter balance near the stab tip. Early Bs also had an active inner leading edge flap; those weren't pinned until after ~1966, when the mod was added to all new airframes in Block 26 and later; and modified (along with the addition of slotted stabs) on Bs/Ns as each aircraft went through phase or the B-Line mod. But it wasn't typical to have the leading and trailing edge flaps deployed while parked on the ramp.

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9 hours ago, allthumbs said:

What’s odd about this Phantom?

 

EgDRg6g.jpg

 

 

 

The "USS Oriskany" on the fuselage.  Essex boats were, IIRC, too small to safely operate Phantoms so they kept Crusaders as their Fighter squadrons until the last Essex boats retired in the early-mid 70s.

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10 hours ago, allthumbs said:

What’s odd about this Phantom?

 

The A/C # 61 on the lower side of the outboard wing panel.

Barry

10 hours ago, allthumbs said:

 

 

 

 

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That's a great, and little known photo.  Back at the start of CAG-16, when all the squadrons were sequentially numbered (VF-161, VF-162, VA-163, VA-164, etc.). This shot is circa 64 following Oriskany's 64 cruise with VF-161--they transitioned from Demons after the deployment. But Phantoms wouldn't be used on the 27C class Essex boats, so VF-161 was replaced by VMF(AW)-212 for Oriskany's 65 cruise. VF-111 would eventually replace them. Nice touch with the 161 Modex for VF-161, but going into the 65 cruise, the Modex's were fairly non-standard too.

 

Want to know more, you can read "Bloody Sixteen" by me :D 

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