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I never get tired of Phantoms :)


Jennings Heilig
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6 hours ago, easixpedro said:

Question for the mind hive here. Looks like early F-4Bs had black rims on the main mounts. Did they? And when did they go to white?

Just went through my collection of 119 period photos of Bravos.  Three versions are apparent.  All black, black center white rim, all white; the inboard face that is.  The outboard side, white or black rim, with brake assembly black or white with generous coating of brake pad dust and wear grease.

 

I say paint what you like and dare someone to prove you wrong!

 

Timmy!

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8 hours ago, Timmy! said:

Just went through my collection of 119 period photos of Bravos.  Three versions are apparent.  All black, black center white rim, all white; the inboard face that is.  The outboard side, white or black rim, with brake assembly black or white with generous coating of brake pad dust and wear grease.

 

I say paint what you like and dare someone to prove you wrong!

 

Timmy!

I came to the same conclusion…sometimes 2 variations on the same jet. It’s almost like maintenance was more concerned about meeting the sortie generation requirements than a spiffy jet.

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Just finished up Osprey's USAF F-4 Phantom MiG Killers -1972 - 1973, which I found to be a very well researched and written book about a truly fascinating period in the Vietnam War, where the USAF was starting to transition to the modern tactics that it's used for the last 30 years or so with great success.   Anyway, the book quotes a couple of pilots who stated that by November of '72, the USAF had a squadron or so worth of Rivet Haste F-4E's in theater.  These had the latest mods including Combat Tree, TISEO, slats and the "556 mod" which was kind of a poor man's HOTAS.   What they didn't provide were any pics of these jets.    I had always heard that no slatted F-4's made it into combat before war's end and only a very few F-4's trialed the TISEO system.    Wondering if anyone out there has pictures of these late-mod'ed jets?   

Edited by John1
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10 hours ago, Finn said:

Lots of details to see:

 

 

Another great example of the McAir factory applied stencil data.  Note all the white dots at the edges of the removable access doors.  Relatively shiny Corogard aluminum paint on the leading edges of the flying surfaces and the inboard pylon.

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An absolutely fascinating photo.  President Kennedy visited McDonnell for a tour on 12 Sep 62.  It wasn’t until 18 Sep 62 that the unification of military aircraft designations took place.  Thus, on the date of this photo (which is confirmed by the Kennedy Library), what we see here are two F4H-1s.  The one in the background is carrying full USAF markings. If you look closely, the TAC badge appears to be the same size as the ones applied to the two aircraft that were marked as F-110As (BuNos 149405 and ‘406), but the lightning bolt appears to be the simpler style found on the borrowed F-4Bs that went to MacDill with the 4453rd CCTS, and later on the production F-4Cs.   She otherwise looks like a regular Air Force bird, and even has the bronze green anti-glare panel (interestingly, the F4H-1 in Navy markings has a black anti-glare).  The serial on her tail reads “50420” which corresponds with F4H-1 BuNo 150420.  That aircraft made its first flight on 1 Aug 62, and was delivered (to the Navy) on 16 October.  So JFK’s visit falls squarely in the middle of that period. 

 

I’ve never seen another photo of this aircraft done up in USAF markings. Clearly they did it specifically for JFK’s visit, and it would seem only for a very brief period.  

 

4RrLez.jpg

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11 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

An absolutely fascinating photo.  President Kennedy visited McDonnell for a tour on 12 Sep 62.  It wasn’t until 18 Sep 62 that the unification of military aircraft designations took place.  Thus, on the date of this photo (which is confirmed by the Kennedy Library), what we see here are two F4H-1s.  The one in the background is carrying full USAF markings. If you look closely, the TAC badge appears to be the same size as the ones applied to the two aircraft that were marked as F-110As (BuNos 149405 and ‘406), but the lightning bolt appears to be the simpler style found on the borrowed F-4Bs that went to MacDill with the 4453rd CCTS, and later on the production F-4Cs.   She otherwise looks like a regular Air Force bird, and even has the bronze green anti-glare panel (interestingly, the F4H-1 in Navy markings has a black anti-glare).  The serial on her tail reads “50420” which corresponds with F4H-1 BuNo 150420.  That aircraft made its first flight on 1 Aug 62, and was delivered (to the Navy) on 16 October.  So JFK’s visit falls squarely in the middle of that period. 

 

I’ve never seen another photo of this aircraft done up in USAF markings. Clearly they did it specifically for JFK’s visit, and it would seem only for a very brief period.  

 

4RrLez.jpg

As part of my last job, I spent a LOT of time at the Boeing plant which is just down the road. This plant is still there--it's on the north side of Lambert Field in Saint Louis (KSTL). South side of the field is a commercial hub, north side of the field is military/Boeing. Pretty cool to drive along Banshee Road and look at it. It's empty now, but looks just the same. While Boeing is king now, the folks around there have long memories. I bought a McDonnell Gemini capsule shirt down there and the lady told me how happy she was that I was buying a McDonnell product--not McDonnell Douglass or Boeing mind you! 

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13 hours ago, Jennings Heilig said:

An absolutely fascinating photo.  President Kennedy visited McDonnell for a tour on 12 Sep 62.  It wasn’t until 18 Sep 62 that the unification of military aircraft designations took place.  Thus, on the date of this photo (which is confirmed by the Kennedy Library), what we see here are two F4H-1s.  The one in the background is carrying full USAF markings. If you look closely, the TAC badge appears to be the same size as the ones applied to the two aircraft that were marked as F-110As (BuNos 149405 and ‘406), but the lightning bolt appears to be the simpler style found on the borrowed F-4Bs that went to MacDill with the 4453rd CCTS, and later on the production F-4Cs.   She otherwise looks like a regular Air Force bird, and even has the bronze green anti-glare panel (interestingly, the F4H-1 in Navy markings has a black anti-glare).  The serial on her tail reads “50420” which corresponds with F4H-1 BuNo 150420.  That aircraft made its first flight on 1 Aug 62, and was delivered (to the Navy) on 16 October.  So JFK’s visit falls squarely in the middle of that period. 

 

I’ve never seen another photo of this aircraft done up in USAF markings. Clearly they did it specifically for JFK’s visit, and it would seem only for a very brief period.  

 

4RrLez.jpg

There were three F4H-1s painted up, 150413 (50413 FJ-413), 150420 (50420 FJ-420) & 150433 (50433 FJ-433). This wasn't done specifically for JFKs visit, though it certainly played a part. All three went to Las Vegas in September 1962, 150420 & 150413 participating as guest entrants at the William Tell Fighter Weapons Meet at Nellis AFB (15-20 September), whilst 150433 was flown into McCarran Field and then towed down to the Las Vegas Convention Center, which was hosting the Air Force Association’s 16th National Convention & Aerospace Panorama (150420/150413 also performed a firepower demo for various Air Force Association guests on 22 September). All three were on unofficial loan and had been accepted by the Navy and were awaiting delivery in the custody of BuWeps Fleet Readiness Rep at St. Louis. 150413/150420 had been accepted by the Navy on 4 September, whilst 150433 accepted 6 September. They were subsequently delivered in October/November, 150413 to  VF-102 on 1 November, 150420 to VMF(AW)-531 on 16 October, and 150433 to VF-121 13 October.

 

Edited by Peter Greengrass
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