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Lockheed T-33A-1-LO 'T-Bird' RDAF


kkarlsen
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Beautiful work Kent!

 

One advice if I may: do not fully open the airbrakes as the kit is unfortunately wrong in that area. Note this is also the case of the Avionix resin set!

 

Actually, the full airframe brake wells had no ceiling. As on the F-80, you saw there a lot of hydraulic pipes, wires, hoses and connectors that were close to the front of the Allison J33 engine.

 

Very nice project. Such trainers are unfortunately not as popular as fighters.

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52 minutes ago, thierry laurent said:

Beautiful work Kent!

 

One advice if I may: do not fully open the airbrakes as the kit is unfortunately wrong in that area. Note this is also the case of the Avionix resin set!

 

Actually, the full airframe brake wells had no ceiling. As on the F-80, you saw there a lot of hydraulic pipes, wires, hoses and connectors that are were close to the front of the Allison J33 engine.

 

Very nice project. Such trainers are unfortunately not as popuar as fighters.

 

Some of the photos I have of the described area...

 

81JozTl.jpg

 

S3JUErK.jpg

 

fstcGiE.jpg

 

4kYEs1m.jpg

 

I will try to make the brake wells as correct as possible, but maybe the solution is to display them as half open brakes...

 

Cheers: Kent

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  • 5 months later...
Posted (edited)

I'm still spending a lot of time in the different wards at the hospital.

But I'm finally picking up speed, it has been a long journey...

 

k4RuAlI.jpg

 

The landing gear has been mounted, and a scratched access ladder.

 

murc5S5.jpg

 

The scratched flaps and some of the decals have been applied.

 

Cheers: Kent

Edited by kkarlsen
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Hi Kent

I'm currently building a big T-33, so I read through your build to pick up some tips. Very nice!

For the speed brakes, I don't think it's possible to have them half-open in real life. When I flew them ages ago (summer of '86), we usually parked them with speed brakes fully open. The switch was a simple slide open/close, with no ability to stop them partway. I suppose it's possible (but not sure) for the techs to move them partly closed after hydraulic power is gone, but it may not be possible.

Even on a real aircraft, it's hard to crawl under that area and see up inside. During walkarounds, I would mostly look on the ground to see if there were any fresh fluid leaks coming from the gear wells and speed brake wells, because it was hard to get underneath.

I have some detail shots of a museum aircraft from Bagotville, Quebec, in case you want some. There are some of the nose and main gear wells, if you want to see the tubing and other stuff in there.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Finally finished. This took a while longer than I expected, but anyhow it's done...

 

AZCuMv0.jpg

 

4WQFGRU.jpg

 

RO0qXow.jpg

 

4SWkbah.jpg

 

ffKNFS2.jpg

 

I struggled a bit with the aluminium surfaces, what I didn't want was a 'nice' surface, but a weathered look of real 'worn metal', but not too much.

 

bI0exMV.jpg

 

In the end I opted the DT-571 one of the planes which was used  for the Delmar tow target system. This aircraft was serving from 1961 until 1976 RDAF.

(It was flown to Norway in 1981, where it was restored and is now on exhibit at the 'Flyhistoriske Museum Sola' in Stavanger in Norwegian 'attire')

 

Cheers: Kent

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