Jump to content

1:32nd scale - Bristol M1.c


Recommended Posts

Hi all,
After the trials and tribulations of several resin model builds recently, I thought I'd do a 'mojo' build.
I've chosen the 'Special Hobby' 1:32nd Bristol M1.c 'Bullet'.

 

pageheader.jpg

 

This particular model build will depict the Bristol M.1c ‘Bullet’, Serial No. C4907 of No.150 Squadron RAF, operating in Macedonia during 1918.
This aircraft was flown by Lt. K.B. Moseley, who was credited with the shooting down of an Albatros D.V on the 9th of July, 1918 over the Rupel Pass.
This same aircraft was also flown by Lt. J.P. Cavers, who was credited with the shooting down of a LVG on the 1st of September and another LVG on the 2nd of September.  

 

The underside of the wings and fuselage were said to be a light blue colour, apparently to reduce the absorbed heat reflected from the ground.
It's thought the propeller spinner was of the same colour.
The colour of the upper surfaces has been depicted as either a red/brown (PC 12) or an olive green (early PC10).
The kit instructions and the colour profile by artist Ronnie Barr have the PC12 colour, whereas the ‘Windsock’ Data file colour is PC10.
As always the definition of colours from early monochrome photographs has always been problematic and the shade differences between PC10 and PC12 are no exception.
The ’Windsock’ Data file states that it may have been that these aircraft were painted with PC12 when routed through the aircraft depot at Salonika, Greece.
However, it was more likely the colour of aircraft operated in Macedonia were PC10, with the possible exception of No.72 Squadron.
I've decided to use the PC10 colour, based on the ‘Windsock’ data.

 

Mike  
 

Edited by sandbagger
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hi all, 
The engine for the Bristol is done.
It's the basic kit engine with just the ignition leads added.
The leads were made from twisted 0.125 mm copper wire and annealed to soften and discolour them.
The engine was painted with 'Alclad' lacquers - Black Base (ALC-305-60), Steel (ALC-112) and Exhaust Manifold (ALC-123).

 

The kit engine was used as it is a good enough quality not to require an aftermarket version.
Besides, once fitted, very little of the engine will be visible inside the engine cowl and behind the propeller and huge spinner.

 

Now it's onto the cockpit,

 

Mike

 

engdone.jpg

Edited by sandbagger
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
I'm working my way through the cockpit assembly.
Most is assembled ready for painting.
There are other parts to add after they've been painted.
I've drill 0.3 mm diameter holes and added 'GasPatch' 1:48th 'one end' turnbuckles to the rudder bar.
Added a 0.3 mm rod to the control column to add strength to its attachment to the floor (hole drilled to receive the rod).
I've also drilled 0.3 mm diameter holes across the control column for the elevator control wires.

 

The instrument panel of the cockpit right side frame is orientated incorrectly in the instructions.
The photograph shows how it was mounted, so I've gone with that,

 

Mike

 

shot13.jpgpit1.jpgrigging1.jpgaileronpulleys.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
Most of the cockpit has been assembled now.
The control lines and bracing lines are 0.08 mm diameter mono-filament, with 0.4 mm diameter Nickel-Silver tubes and 'Gaspatch 1:48th scale turnbuckles.
I've still fit the engine controls and rods and the pilot's seat with harness.
Then it's a bit of weathering and finally sealing, to add the semi-sheen finish to the wood work and leather seat cushion,

 

Mike

 

rigging8.jpg

 

 

rigging7.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
The cockpit is ready to be fitted into the fuselage, when most of it won't be visible (why do we do it).
Additional pipes are 0.4 mm diameter lead wire.
Engine control rods are 0.4 mm diameter Nickel-Silver tube, chemically blackened with 'Black-It'.
The supplied seat harness was photo-etch and looked remarkably the same as the 'Eduard' set for the WW2 Fairy 'Swordfish' aircraft.
Needless to say I replaced them with the coloured textile set from 'HGW Models',

Mike.

 

pitdone1.jpg

 

pitdone2.jpg

 

pitdone3.jpgpitdone4.jpg

 

pitdone5.jpg

 

fusclosed.jpg

 

 

Edited by sandbagger
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
Just a few updates.
I've modified the front end to accept a 'ProperPlane' laminated propeller ('Lang' type).
This entailed replacing the propeller shaft on the engine with 2.0 mm tube and filing the front face of the spinner support ring.
Also sanding the rear face of the propeller hub, re-profiling the spinner cut-outs and thinning the walls of the engine cowl and spinner.

 

PPprop2.jpg

 

The Vickers Mk.1 machine gun was replaced with a 'GasPatch' version, which required lengthening the fuselage recess to accept the weapon.
The two ammunition feed guards were also slightly re-profiled.
I also drilled out what was a solid ammunition ejector chute.

 

fwdfus.jpg

 

The undercarriage struts attachment to the fuselage was poor and didn't allow for the struts to be angled correctly.
These were modified to have 0.4 mm diameter locating rods and the tops of the struts chamfered to the shape of the fuselage.
Also the two axle torque bars were replaced with stronger 1.0 mm diameter rod.

 

uc1.jpg

 

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
The wings are supported by a strut assembly over the cockpit.
The kit supplied struts are intended to be 'butt' glued together at the top and into shallow recesses in the fuselage sides.
Not a very satisfactory assembly and probably not really strong enough to take the weight of the solid wings with rigging.
Therefore I've replaced them with aero-shaped tubing with 0.4 mm diameter rods for locating into the fuselage.
The whole assembly is soft soldered for strength,

 

Mike

 

tripod1.jpg

 

tripod2.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All,
I've been working on the undersides of the Bristol, which had the lined doped in light blue to help reflect the heat whilst operating in Mesopotamia.
First was to prime grey then mask off the wing ribs and fuselage longerons.

 

paint1.jpg

 

Then pre-shade using 'Tamiya' Smoke (XF19).

 

paint2.jpg

 

Lightly overspray with 'Tamiya' Light Blue (XF23).

 

paint3.jpg

 

Then remove all masking and a final light top coat of the light blue.

 

paint4.jpg

 

The propeller assembly was done at the same time.

 

propdone.jpg

 

Now it's onto painting to top surfaces with PC10, which the 'Windsock' data file suggest would be correct (not the brown PC12 often used).

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,
The underside of the wings and fuselage were said to be a light blue colour, in order to reduce the absorbed heat reflected from the ground.
It is thought the propeller spinner was of the same colour.
The colour of the upper surfaces has been depicted as either a red/brown (PC 12) or an olive green (early PC10).
The kit instructions and most colour profiles have the PC12 colour.
However, the ‘Windsock’ Data file No:52 colour profile is PC10.
As always the definition of colours from early monochrome photographs has always been problematic and the shade differences between PC10 and PC12 are no exception.
The ’Windsock’ Data file states that it is possible that these aircraft were painted with PC12 when routed through the aircraft depot at Salonika, Greece.
However, it was more likely the colour of aircraft operated in Macedonia was PC10, with the possible exception of No.72 Squadron.
I decided to use the PC10 colour, based on the ‘Windsock’ data.  
The paint used was 'Hataka' lacquer Dark Olive Green (C301).

 

Mike

paint5.jpg

 

paint6.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...