Jump to content

Got my jet back from rehab- Back in the Albatros


Recommended Posts

10 hours ago, chuck540z3 said:

So cool.  While we play with little plastic airplanes, you continue to fly real ones- and a real jet no less.  It must be great to get your baby back.

 

Cheers,

Chuck

 

Thanks Chuck,

yes- this has been a long road back for this jet. I’m partnered with the American Airpower Museum at Republic airport now; so this L-39 joins two other L-39’s at the museum. 

Much to be grateful for-

 

cheers

 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, AlbertD said:

That's one cool toy. It must be a blast to fly. Are the requirements and licensing much different than a prop plane?

 

Because the L-39 is certified in the US in the experimental category, the FAA requires pilots to obtain an EAA (similar to a type rating). To take the L-39 EAA checkride, the pilot must first have 1000 hours total time and an instrument rating.

 

cheers

 

Pete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/23/2020 at 8:41 AM, Pete Fleischmann said:

 

Because the L-39 is certified in the US in the experimental category, the FAA requires pilots to obtain an EAA (similar to a type rating). To take the L-39 EAA checkride, the pilot must first have 1000 hours total time and an instrument rating.

 

cheers

 

Pete

Are the seats live or do the feds require that they be disarmed?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


my seats are cold, but there is no FAA restriction on hot seats.

 

Interesting....  i thought I read somewhere that at one point, the feds required that all seats and pyrotechnic systems had to be disarmed.   Out of curiosity, why would you deactivate the seats?   I'm guessing it must be due to the cost of periodic maint / inspections?   Assume you still wear a chute in the jet?   

 

Also, how's the spare parts supply for these birds and where do you find shops that have the experience to work on them?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, John1 said:

Interesting....  i thought I read somewhere that at one point, the feds required that all seats and pyrotechnic systems had to be disarmed.   Out of curiosity, why would you deactivate the seats?   I'm guessing it must be due to the cost of periodic maint / inspections?   Assume you still wear a chute in the jet?   

 

Also, how's the spare parts supply for these birds and where do you find shops that have the experience to work on them?

 


most owners safe the seats because they are very expensive to maintain. Yes, I wear a chute- and the Manual egress procedure is similar to bailing out of a Mustang.

 

there are plenty of spares. Tons of qualified folks to work on the jet. I also instruct in the L-39 at Code1 Aviation in Rockford IL. They are the biggest/ best L -39 sales and support company in the US.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Juggernut said:

As an aircraft mechanic, I’m curious as to what caused the wheel to leave home in the first place causing the emergency landing in the first place.  Did the NTSB find the problem or was it obvious?


the way the nuts thread on, in a case like this  you’ll only lose the right one.

we found some exploded metal on the runway-

after the fact, the left wheel was discovered to have the wrong gauge safety wire holding its nut.

The jet flew for 30+ hours after having both main wheels off for a brake change prior to this incident.

we never figured it out. The NTSB never got involved.

I suspect improper assembly or component failure.

Edited by Pete Fleischmann
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Pete Fleischmann said:


the way the nuts thread on, in a case like this  you’ll only lose the right one.

we found some exploded metal on the runway-

after the fact, the left wheel was discovered to have the wrong gauge safety wire holding its nut.

The jet flew for 30+ hours after having both main wheels off for a brake change prior to this incident.

we never figured it out. The NTSB never got involved.

I suspect improper assembly or component failure.


Thanks for the explanation.  Makes me remember the .041 safety wire requirement on the nose wheel of the Lear 35A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Pete Fleischmann changed the title to Got my jet back from rehab- Back in the Albatros

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...