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Riveting circles (BF109 wheel bulges)


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Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me with a riveting question.:rolleyes:

 

I'm thinking of taking a shot at riveting my next project which will likely be either a BF-109 G4 or G10.  However I'm not sure how to make equally spaced rivets in a perfect circle around the wheel bulges of the 109.  Is there a trick anyone could recommend?

 

G5_common_top.jpg

 

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thanks for your time.  - Jeff

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I guess I have the same problem although it's a Spitfire wing.

My approach so far is to make a template (circle with notches) with my Slihouette cutter, but I haven't tried it yet since the project is stalled.

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4 minutes ago, Fanes said:

I guess I have the same problem although it's a Spitfire wing.

My approach so far is to make a template (circle with notches) with my Slihouette cutter, but I haven't tried it yet since the project is stalled.

 

Well I think you better un-stall and get it going :D

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I measure the circle with a mm ruler.  I first locate and draw in the surrounding rivet patterns, and the bulge if it's not in place. Sometimes there's nothing worse than coloring outside the lines, if you know what I mean.  Then I draw in the circle and measure the diameter from the outside and tic off the mm's.  If the bulge is in place there is still room to draw the circle.

 

Works for me.  Hope this helps.

Sincerely,

Mark

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In the past, when I used to make "solid masters" (rather than CAD) for resin models, I came across situations where I had to make lines of rivets like that. For that I used a "measuring compass" such as this: https://www.amazon.com/Precision-JARLINK-Geometry-Professional-Measuring/dp/B07F6Y4YQS/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=measuring+compass&qid=1590920512&sr=8-4

You can get similar items in other places, the one I have is very very old brass tool made in the 1920s. What you need is the ability to insert needles in both arms and adjust/preset the distance between these two needles by turning the screw wheel between the two arms. Once you preset the distance between the needle points, just press the needles into the surface. You will have two holes. Then place the "rear needle" into the "forward hole" and press the "forward needle" into the surface thus creating a "third hole", then place the "rear needle" into this "third hole" and create a new hole with the "forward needle" and continue like this until you get the whole line built. It is tedious and requires concentration but it is doable. To make that circular line of rivets, draw the circle line on the surface and then track along the line using the method described before. 

HTH 

Radu 

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32 minutes ago, Radub said:

In the past, when I used to make "solid masters" (rather than CAD) for resin models, I came across situations where I had to make lines of rivets like that. For that I used a "measuring compass" such as this: https://www.amazon.com/Precision-JARLINK-Geometry-Professional-Measuring/dp/B07F6Y4YQS/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=measuring+compass&qid=1590920512&sr=8-4

You can get similar items in other places, the one I have is very very old brass tool made in the 1920s. What you need is the ability to insert needles in both arms and adjust/preset the distance between these two needles by turning the screw wheel between the two arms. Once you preset the distance between the needle points, just press the needles into the surface. You will have two holes. Then place the "rear needle" into the "forward hole" and press the "forward needle" into the surface thus creating a "third hole", then place the "rear needle" into this "third hole" and create a new hole with the "forward needle" and continue like this until you get the whole line built. It is tedious and requires concentration but it is doable. To make that circular line of rivets, draw the circle line on the surface and then track along the line using the method described before. 

HTH 

Radu 

 

Real old school, back to my A level Geometric and Engineering Drawing

 

Richard

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